Goodreads helps you follow your favorite authors. Be the first to learn about new releases!
Start by following Melissa V. Harris-Perry.

Melissa V. Harris-Perry Melissa V. Harris-Perry > Quotes


Melissa V. Harris-Perry quotes (showing 1-16 of 16)

“The disobedience if Eve in the Genesis story has been used to justify women's inequality and suffering in many Christian traditions. Thus, what is understood as women's complicity in evil leads much traditional theological reflection on suffering to offer the "consequent admonition to 'grin and bear it' because such is the deserved place of women." Similarly, when Jesus is seen as a divine co-sufferer, the potentially liberating narratives of Jesus as a revolutionary leader who takes the side of the poor and dispossessed can be ignored in favor of religious beliefs more interested in Jesus as a stoic victim. Christ's suffering is inverted and used to justify women's continued suffering in systems of injustice by framing it as redemptive.”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America
“Loss of social standing is an ever-present threat for individuals whose social acceptance is based on behavioral traits rather than unconditional human value.”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America
“Citizenship is more than an individual exchange of freedoms for rights; it is also membership in a body politic, a nation, and a community. To be deemed fair, a system must offer its citizens equal opportunities for public recognition, and groups cannot systematically suffer from misrecognition in the form of stereotype and stigma.”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America
“Therapists are less likely to perceive a black woman as sad; instead they see her as angry or anxious.”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America
“The mythology of black women as promiscuous was important to maintaining the profitable exploitation of slave society. In freedom, it remained important as a means of racial and gender control.”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America
“Their anger is not experienced as a psychological reality but is seen through an ideology that distorts black women's lived experiences.”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America
“Misrecognition subverts the possibility of equal democratic participation.”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America
“Sisters are more than the sum of their relative disadvantages: they are active agents who craft meaning out of their circumstances and do so in complicated and diverse ways.”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America
“A person or group of people can suffer real damage, real distortion, if the people or society around them mirror back to them a confining or demeaning or contemptible picture of themselves.”24”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America
“Women were expected to sit in the pews, receiving messages from men in the pulpit. Their role was to recognize God in their pastor, not to expect or demand that he recognize God in them.”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America
“To be a person of relative power and privilege viewing a person of less power and privilege is a political act. The gaze of the powerful is neither neutral nor benign; misrecognition hinders the ability of black people to act as citizens. Indeed, hooks asserts, challenging white people’s assumptions about what they see when they view black people is a critical step toward liberation and equality.21”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America
“I am concerned that in their efforts to evade the Sapphire stereotype, black women may be discouraged from demanding equal consideration of their specific political needs within black political discourses.”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America
“No Mirrors in My Nana’s House” Sweet Honey in the Rock LYRICS BY YSAYE MARIA BARNWELL Sweet Honey in the Rock is a Grammy Award–winning vocal group of black women vocalists founded in 1973 by Bernice Johnson Reagon. The group’s members have changed during its long tenure, but it retains a core of five vocalists and a sign-language interpreter. Their performances are deeply embodied celebrations of black women’s lived experiences. The group’s name is derived from Psalm 81:16: “But you would be fed with the finest of wheat; with honey from the rock I would satisfy you.” Sign-language interpreter Dr. Ysaye Barnwell joined Sweet Honey in the Rock in 1979 and appears in more than thirty recordings with the group. She is the author of one of the group’s most popular recordings, “No Mirrors in My Nana’s House.” It is a stirring piece that reveals how the loving protection of black women can shield black girls from a painful world that seeks to negate their beauty and worth. In 1998 the lyrics became a children’s book published by Harcourt Brace. There were no mirrors in my Nana’s house, no mirrors in my Nana’s house. There were no mirrors in my Nana’s house, no mirrors in my Nana’s house. And the beauty that I saw in everything was in her eyes (like the rising of the sun). I never knew that my skin was too black. I never knew that my nose was too flat. I never knew that my clothes didn’t fit. I never knew there were things that I’d missed, cause the beauty in everything was in her eyes (like the rising of the sun); . . . was in her eyes. There were no mirrors in my Nana’s house, no mirrors in my Nana’s house. And the beauty that I saw in everything was in her eyes (like the rising of the sun). I was intrigued by the cracks in the walls. I tasted, with joy, the dust that would fall. The noise in the hallway was music to me. The trash and the rubbish just cushioned my feet. And the beauty in everything was in her eyes (like the rising of the sun). . . . was in her eyes. There were no mirrors in my Nana’s house, no mirrors in my Nana’s house. And the beauty that I saw in everything was in her eyes (like the rising of the sun). The world outside was a magical place. I only knew love. I never knew hate, and the beauty in everything was in her eyes (like the rising of the sun). . . . was in her eyes. There were no mirrors in my Nana’s house, no mirrors in my Nana’s house. There were no mirrors in my Nana’s house, no mirrors in my Nana’s house. And the beauty that I saw in everything was in her eyes (like the rising of the sun).”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America
“At its core, black theology is predicated on the assertion that God has a unique relationship with African Americans. God is not a passive bystander in human history but rather an active participant in the struggles of oppressed and dispossessed people.”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry
“Sisters can sometimes get their way by confirming the expectation that they are threatening and angry, but doing so may leave them feeling that they have not truly been heard at all.”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America
“Individuals from disempowered social groups desire recognition for their group but also want recognition of their distinctiveness from the group.18”
Melissa V. Harris-Perry, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America


All Quotes | Add A Quote
Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game

Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America Sister Citizen
2,334 ratings
Open Preview
The Unitarian Universalist Pocket Guide The Unitarian Universalist Pocket Guide
126 ratings
Open Preview
Modern Families: Stories of Extraordinary Journeys to Kinship Modern Families
18 ratings
Open Preview