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Maya Angelou Maya Angelou > Quotes


Maya Angelou quotes Showing 241-270 of 1,232

“I can be changed by what happens to me. But I refuse to be reduced by it.”
Maya Angelou, Letter to My Daughter
“You can only become great at something you are willing to sacrifice for”
Maya Angelou
“If I insist on being pessimistic, there is always tomorrow. Today I am blessed.”
Maya Angelou
“I did then what I knew best, when I knew better, I did better. Maya Angelo”
Maya Angelou
“My mother said I must always be intolerant of ignorance but understanding of illiteracy. That some people, unable to go to school, were more intelligent and more educated than college professors.”
Maya Angelou
“As I ate she began the first of what we later called “my lessons in living.” She said that I must always be intolerant of ignorance but understanding of illiteracy. That some people, unable to go to school, were more educated and even more intelligent than college professors. She encouraged me to listen carefully to what country people called mother wit. That in those homely sayings was couched the collective wisdom of generations.”
Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
“Since time is the one immaterial object which we cannot influence—neither speed up nor slow down, add to nor diminish—it is an imponderably valuable gift.”
Maya Angelou, Wouldn't Take Nothing for My Journey Now
tags: 1993, time
“Thomas Wolfe warned in the title of America’s great novel that ‘You Can’t Go Home Again.’ I enjoyed the book but I never agreed with the title. I believe that one can never leave home. I believe that one carries the shadows, the dreams, the fears and dragons of home under one’s skin, at the extreme corners of one’s eyes and possibly in the gristle of the earlobe.

Home is that youthful region where a child is the only real living inhabitant. Parents, siblings, and neighbors, are mysterious apparitions, who come, go, and do strange unfathomable things in and around the child, the region’s only enfranchised citizen.
[…]

We may act sophisticated and worldly but I believe we feel safest when we go inside ourselves and find home, a place where we belong and maybe the only place we really do.”
Maya Angelou, Letter to My Daughter
“Each time I write a book, every time I face that yellow pad, the challenge is so great. I have written eleven books, but each time I think, ‘Uh oh, they’re going to find out now. I’ve run a game on everybody and they’re going to find me out.”
Maya Angelou
“Can't Do is like Don't Care. Neither of them have a home.”
Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
“You dwell in whitened castles
with deep and poisoned moats
and cannot hear the curses
which fill your children's throats.”
Maya Angelou
“remember this: When you cross my doorstep, you have already been raised. With what you have learned...you know the difference between right and wrong. Do right. Don't anybody raise you from the way you have been raised. Know you will have to make adaptations, in love, in relationships, in friends, in society, in work, but don't let anybody change your mind.”
Maya Angelou, Mom & Me & Mom
“If you’re not angry, you’re either a stone, or you’re too sick to be angry. You should be angry. You must not be bitter. Bitterness is like cancer. It eats upon the host. It doesn’t do anything to the object of its displeasure. So use that anger, yes. You write it. You paint it. You dance it. You march it. You vote it. You do everything about it. You talk it. Never stop talking it.”
Maya Angelou
“Prejudice is a burden that confuses the past, threatens the future and renders the present inaccessible…We may encounter many defeats but we must not be defeated.”
Maya Angelou
“I find relief from the questions only when I concede that I am not obliged to know everything. I remind myself it is sufficient to know what I know, and that what I know, may not always be true.”
Maya Angelou
“My life has been long, and believing that life loves the liver of it, I have dared to try many things, sometimes trembling, but daring, still.”
Maya Angelou
“You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I’ll rise.”
Maya Angelou, And Still I Rise
tags: poem
“Let nothing dim the light that shines from within”
Maya Angelou
“I am convinced that most people do not grow up. We find parking spaces and honor our credit cards. We marry and dare to have children and call that growing up. I think what we do is mostly grow old. We carry accumulation of years in our bodies and on our faces, but generally our real selves, the children inside, are still innocent and shy as magnolias.

We may act sophisticated and worldly but I believe we feel safest when we go inside ourselves and find home, a place where we belong and maybe the only place we really do.”
Maya Angelou, Letter to My Daughter
“I had read a Tale of Two Cities and found it up to my standards as a romantic novel. She opened the first page and I heard poetry for the first time in my life...her voice slid in and curved down trough and over the words. She was nearly singing.”
Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
“Remember, people will judge you by your actions not your intentions. You may have a heart of gold but so does a hard-boiled egg.”
Maya Angelou
“I don't believe an accident of birth makes people sisters or brothers. It makes them siblings, gives them mutuality of parentage. Sisterhood and brotherhood is a condition people have to work at.”
Maya Angelou
“We write for the same reason that we walk, talk, climb mountains or swim the oceans — because we can. We have some impulse within us that makes us want to explain ourselves to other human beings. That’s why we paint, that’s why we dare to love someone- because we have the impulse to explain who we are. Not just how tall we are, or thin… but who we are internally… perhaps even spiritually. There’s something, which impels us to show our inner-souls. The more courageous we are, the more we succeed in explaining what we know.”
Maya Angelou
“Courage is the most important of all the virtues, because without courage you can't practice any other virtue consistently. You can practice any virtue erratically, but nothing consistently without courage.”
Maya Angelou
“The dread of futility has been my life-long plague.”
Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
“In the flush of love's light
we dare be brave
And suddenly we see
that love costs all we are
and will ever be.
Yet it is only love
which sets us free.”
Maya Angelou
“Oh, Black known and unknown poets, how often have your auctioned pains sustained us? Who will compute the lonely nights made less lonely by your songs, or by the empty pots made less tragic by your tales?

If we were a people much given to revealing secrets, we might raise monuments and sacrifice to the memories of our poets, but slavery cured us of that weakness.”
Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
“I really saw clearly, and for the first time, why a mother is really important. Not just because she feeds and also loves and cuddles and even mollycoddles a child, but because in an interesting and maybe an eerie and unworldly way, she stands in the gap. She stands between the unknown and the known.”
Maya Angelou, Mom & Me & Mom
“In all my work what I try to say is that as human beings we are more alike than we are unalike.”
Maya Angelou
“Go," she whispered. "Go. Show them you spell your name W-O-M-A-N.”
Maya Angelou, Mom & Me & Mom


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Letter to My Daughter Letter to My Daughter
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Mom & Me & Mom Mom & Me & Mom
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