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Jarett Kobek quotes Showing 1-30 of 43

“The Internet was a wonderful invention. It was a computer network which people used to remind other people that they were awful pieces of shit.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“The most uninteresting thing in the world is watching narcissists fuck each other.”
Jarett Kobek
“The illusion of the internet was the idea that the opinions of powerless people, freely offered, had some impact on the world. This was, of course, total bullshit.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“One of the curious aspects of the Twenty-First Century was the great delusion amongst many people, particularly in the San Francisco Bay Area, that freedom of speech and freedom of expression were best exercised on technological platforms owned by corporations dedicated to making as much money as possible.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“The only effect of the words of powerless people on the Internet was to inflict misery on other powerless people.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“It’s arguable that Ayn Rand’s finest achievement was crashing the economy twenty-five years after her death.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“In 2012, President Barack Obama ran for re-election against Mitt Romney, the former Governor of Massachusetts, who didn’t have any eumelanin in the basale stratum of his epidermis. It was the usual bargain for J. Karacehennem and other people of the Loony Left. You supported a person whose policies you agreed with, sort of, but who you felt was too beholden to corporate interests and whose foreign policy made you sick. If you didn’t support this person, the alternative was something even worse. Voting was little more than triage.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“Adeline hadn't owned a television since 1992.
She'd suffered fifteen years hearing about how the Internet would transform American culture and open new avenues of expression.
But in the end, it was only more people talking about television.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“She had never gone into an office. She had no idea that most people woke up every weekday morning and went to a place where they were disrespected and worked for people they hated. Adeline didn't realize that when people went to their place of business, they put on a spiritual mask which hid their true selves and their actual opinions.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“The world was run by its bankers. The world was run by its investor class. The world was run by its manufacturers. The history of human destiny was money, the men who controlled it, and nothing more. Money, a measure of humiliation, was the only thing that mattered.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“The whole world was on a script of loss and people only received their pages moments before they read their lines.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“More than anything, The One True God was a potent weapon used by sexually repressed members of society to inflict misery on everyone else.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“The thing is,” said J. Karacehennem, whose last name was Turkish for Black Hell, “that we’ve spent like, what, two or three hundred years wrestling with existentialism, which really is just a way of asking, Why are we on this planet? Why are people here? Why do we lead our pointless lives? All the best philosophical and novelistic minds have tried to answer these questions and all the best philosophical and novelistic minds have failed to produce a working answer. Facebook is amazing because finally we understand why we have hometowns and why we get into relationships and why we eat our stupid dinners and why we have names and why we own idiotic cars and why we try to impress our friends. Why are we here, why do we do all of these things? At last we can offer a solution. We are on Earth to make Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg richer. There is an actual, measurable point to our striving. I guess what I’m saying, really, is that there’s always hope.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“Sometimes it feels like there are only eleven people in the world and the rest are paste.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“Twitter could not be described as it was: a mechanism by which teenagers tormented each other into suicide while obsessing about ephemeral celebrities and on which Adeline argued about whether or not she hated the victims of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory of 1911.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“Wars were giant parties for the ruling elites, who sometimes thought it might be great fun to make the poor kill each other.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“Beyoncé and Rihanna were pop stars. Pop stars were musical performers whose celebrity had exploded to the point where they could be identified by single words. You could say BEYONCÉ or RIHANNA to almost anyone anywhere in the industrialized world and it would conjure a vague neurological image of either Beyoncé or Rihanna. Their songs were about the same six subjects of all songs by all pop stars: love, celebrity, fucking, heartbreak, money and buying ugly shit.
It was the Twenty-First Century. It was the Internet. Fame was everything.
Traditional money had been debased by mass production. Traditional money had ceased to be about an exchange of humiliation for food and shelter. Traditional money had become the equivalent of a fantasy world in which different hunks of vampiric plastic made emphatic arguments about why they should cross the threshold of your home. There was nothing left to buy. Fame was everything because traditional money had failed. Fame was everything because fame was the world’s last valid currency.
Beyoncé and Rihanna were part of a popular entertainment industry which deluged people with images of grotesque success. The unspoken ideology of popular entertainment was that its customers could end up as famous as the performers. They only needed to try hard enough and believe in their dreams.
Like all pop stars, Beyoncé and Rihanna existed off the illusion that their fame was a shared experience with their fans. Their fans weren’t consumers. Their fans were fellow travelers on a journey through life.
In 2013, this connection between the famous and their fans was fostered on Twitter. Beyoncé and Rihanna were tweeting. Their millions of fans were tweeting back. They too could achieve their dreams.
Of course, neither Beyoncé nor Rihanna used Twitter. They had assistants and handlers who packaged their tweets for maximum profit and exposure.
Fame could purchase the illusion of being an Internet user without the purchaser ever touching a mobile phone or a computer.
That was a difference between the rich and the poor.
The poor were doomed to the Internet, which was a wonderful resource for watching shitty television, experiencing angst about other people’s salaries, and casting doubt on key tenets of Mormonism and Scientology.
If Beyoncé or Rihanna were asked about how to be like them and gave an honest answer, it would have sounded like this: “You can’t. You won’t. You are nothing like me. I am a powerful mixture of untamed ambition, early childhood trauma and genetic mystery. I am a portal in the vacuum of space. The formula for my creation is impossible to replicate. The One True God made me and will never make the like again. You are nothing like me.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“The fundamental problem is that every technology embeds the ideologies of its creators! Who made the Internet? The military! The Internet is the product of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency! We call it DARPA for short! Who worked for DARPA? DARPA was a bunch of men! Not a single woman worked on the underlying technologies that fuel our digital universe! Men are the shit of the world and all of our political systems and philosophies were created and devised without the input of women! Half of the world’s population lives beneath systems of government and technological innovation into which their gender had zero input! Democracy is a bullshit ideology that a bunch of slaveholding Greek men constructed between rounds of beating their wives! All the presumed ideologies of men were taken for inescapable actualities and designed into the Internet! Packet switching is an incredible evil!”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“What disturbs and compels about pornography is not the sex, which is always a snooze, but that the medium addresses every social issue in the absolute wrong way. Not long after any social event or trend, a pornographic response emerges. It will be incredibly creepy and wrong headed, an underbelly view of public life via the worst excesses of capitalism in which the answer to every social problem is the commodification of desire.”
Jarett Kobek
“JACK KIRBY is also the central personage of this novel because this is not a good novel. This is a seriously mixed-up book with a central personage who never appears. The plot, like life, resolves into nothing and features emotional suffering without meaning.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“Adeline had moved to San Francisco in 1996, which was a defining moment in the city's history. 1996 was not defined by Adeline's arrival.

1996 as defined by being the year during which the Internet economy exploded into the collective consciousness.

San Francisco had spent much of the Twentieth Century in decline, which meant that it was a bad place for people who liked doing business but a wonderful place for people who were terrible at making money.

San Francisco had been defined by the culture of people who were terrible at making money. It had become a haven for the misfits of America most of who were living in the city's fabulous old houses.

When the Internet economy exploded into the collective consciousness, these people proved that resisting social change was the only thing at which they were less adept than earning money.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“It’s so easy to demonstrate your own righteousness and it’s so easy to challenge the social order when all you’re doing is picking on idiots who are better off ignored and left to wither in the stench of their own lives! You”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“Star Wars was a total piece of shit that had spawned billions of dollars in merchandise and sequels and books and games and pajama bottoms. It was an infinite reservoir, it was an endless void. It was responsible for a cornucopia of made up words like Jedi, the Force and lightsaber.

A lightsaber was a sword made of light. A sword was a weapon used to murder people.

A Jedi was a knight who believed in an idea of relative good and performed supernatural feats using the Force. A Jedi used supernatural feats and his lightsaber to murder people with opposing ideas of relative good.

The Force was an ill-explained mystical energy which ran throughout the fictional universe of Star Wars. It was a device which allowed characters to perform supernatural feats whenever a lull was created by poor writing in the screenplay.

As might be imagined, the Force was used with great frequency.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“He was also one of the twelve Presidents of the United States to own slaves, which is a larger figure than the number of Presidents who had beards.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“You can't stop the gears of capitalism. But you can always be a pain in the ass.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“People came in search of alcohol and food and the illusion that if you combined alcohol and food, they added up to meaning.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“Darling, what I wouldn't give for some friends as wild and maniacal as dear sweet Edward Snowden.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“Ayn Rand was a Russian who didn’t believe in economy.
Her endless novel Atlas Shrugged was about 800 pages long. The book was about how money is awesome and rich people are awesome and everything is awesome except for the poor people who are garbage that should die in the gutter. The big thing that happens in Atlas Shrugged is an asshole named John Galt convinces all the world’s rich people to move to a valley where they can be rich together. Then he gives a speech that runs for 60 pages.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“Like many of the men who worked with technology in the information economy, Erik Willems had a deep affection for juvenile literature.
Which is to say that he liked Science Fiction.
Which is to say that he also liked Robert Heinlein.
Which is to say that he also liked J.R.R. Tolkein.
Which is to say that he also liked Ayn Rand.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet
“Ayn Rand was a speed freak, a social welfare beneficiary and a sex cultist. She was quite possibly the most influential thinker of the last fifty years. There wasn’t much eumelanin in the basale stratum of her epidermis.
She wrote books about how social welfare beneficiaries were garbage who deserved to die in the gutter. All of her books were terrible. All of her books were popular. Several had been turned into unpopular movies.
She was well regarded by very rich people unwilling to accept that their fortunes were a combination of random chance and an innate ability to humiliate others.
Ayn Rand’s books told very rich people that they were good, that their pursuit of wealth was moral and just. Many of these people ended up as CEOs or in high levels of American government.
Ayn Rand was the billionaire’s best friend.”
Jarett Kobek, I Hate the Internet

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