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“If there's one thing you learn by working on a lot of different Web sites, it's that almost any design idea--no matter how appallingly bad--can be made usable in the right circumstances, with enough effort.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“If you want a great site, you’ve got to test. After you’ve worked on a site for even a few weeks, you can’t see it freshly anymore. You know too much. The only way to find out if it really works is to test it.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“Don't make me think”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“It doesn’t matter how many times I have to click, as long as each click is a mindless, unambiguous choice.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“Get rid of half the words on each page, then get rid of half of what’s left.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“Designers love subtle cues, because subtlety is one of the traits of sophisticated design. But Web users are
generally in such a hurry that they routinely miss subtle cues.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“Your primary role should be to share what you know, not to tell people how things should be done.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“Your objective should always be to eliminate instructions entirely by making everything self-explanatory, or as close to it as possible. When instructions are absolutely necessary, cut them back to a bare minimum.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“And not just the right thing; it’s profoundly the right thing to do, because the one argument for accessibility that doesn’t get made nearly often enough is how extraordinarily better it makes some people’s lives. How many opportunities do we have to dramatically improve people’s lives just by doing our job a little better?”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“Happy talk must die”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“The problem is there are no simple “right” answers for most Web design questions (at least not for the important ones). What works is good, integrated design that fills a need—carefully thought out, well executed, and tested.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“In reality, though, most of the time we don’t choose the best option—we choose the first reasonable option, a strategy known as satisficing.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“When fixing problems, always do the least you can.”
Steve Krug, Rocket Surgery Made Easy: The Do-It-Yourself Guide to Finding and Fixing Usability Problems
“If you can’t make something self-evident, you at least need to make it self-explanatory.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“It doesn’t matter how many times I have to click, as long as each click is a mindless, unambiguous choice. —KRUG’S SECOND LAW OF USABILITY”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“Your guess [about the future of technology] is as good as mine. The only thing I'm sure of is (a) most of the predictions I hear are almost certainly wrong, and (b) the things that will turn out to be important will come as a surprise, even though in hindsight they'll seem perfectly obvious.”
Steve Krug
“The fact that the people who built the site didn’t care enough to make things obvious—and easy—can erode our confidence in the site and the organization behind it.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“As a rule, conventions only become conventions if they work.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“The more you watch users carefully and listen to them articulate their intentions, motivations, and thought processes, the more you realize that their individual reactions to Web pages are based on so many variables that attempts to describe users in terms of one-dimensional likes and dislikes are futile and counter-productive. Good design, on the other hand, takes this complexity into account.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“The main thing you need to know about instructions is that no one is going to read them—at least not until after repeated attempts at “muddling through” have failed.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“Keep it simple, so you'll keep doing it.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“If something requires a large investment of time—or looks like it will—it’s less likely to be used.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“Sometimes time spent reinventing the wheel results in a revolutionary new rolling device. But sometimes it just amounts to time spent reinventing the wheel.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“The name of the page will match the words I clicked to get there. In”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“In the last few years, making things more usable has become almost everybody’s responsibility. Visual designers and developers now often find themselves doing things like interaction design (deciding what happens next when the user clicks, taps, or swipes) and information architecture (figuring out how everything should be organized). I”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“Or as Jakob Nielsen so aptly put it: The human brain’s capacity doesn’t change from one year to the next, so the insights from studying human behavior have a very long shelf life. What was difficult for users twenty years ago continues to be difficult today. I”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“Faced with the prospect of following a convention, there’s a great temptation for designers to try reinventing the wheel instead, largely because they feel (not incorrectly) that they’ve been hired to do something new and different, not the same old thing. Not to mention the fact that praise from peers, awards, and high-profile job offers are rarely based on criteria like “best use of conventions.” Occasionally, time spent reinventing the wheel results in a revolutionary new rolling device. But usually it just amounts to time spent reinventing the wheel.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“Another needless source of question marks over people’s heads is links and buttons that aren’t obviously clickable. As a user, I should never have to devote a millisecond of thought to whether things are clickable—or not.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“usability is about people and how they understand and use things, not about technology.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
“A person of average (or even below average) ability and experience can figure out how to use the thing to accomplish something without it being more trouble than it’s worth. Take my word for it: It’s really that simple.”
Steve Krug, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability

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