Goodreads helps you follow your favorite authors. Be the first to learn about new releases!
Start by following Trevor Noah.

Trevor Noah Trevor Noah > Quotes


more photos (1)

Trevor Noah quotes Showing 211-240 of 358

“It’s easy to be judgmental about crime when you live in a world wealthy enough to be removed from it. But the hood taught me that everyone has different notions of right and wrong, different definitions of what constitutes crime, and what level of crime they’re willing to participate in. If a crackhead comes through and he’s got a crate of Corn Flakes boxes he’s stolen out of the back of a supermarket, the poor mom isn’t thinking, I’m aiding and abetting a criminal by buying these Corn Flakes. No. She’s thinking, My family needs food and this guy has Corn Flakes”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood
“As I grew older I started buying my own books. I loved fantasy, loved to get lost in worlds that didn’t exist.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood
“And, finally, for bringing me into this world and making me the man I am today, I owe the greatest debt, a debt I can never repay, to my mother.”
Trevor Noah, Born A Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“They were like, “Trevor, you have to ask her. You’re the only two. It’s your responsibility.” It was like our species was going to die out if we didn’t mate and carry on. Which I’ve learned in life is something that white people do without even realizing it. “You two look the same, therefore we must arrange for you to have sex.” I”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“So many black families spend all of their time trying to fix the problems of the past. That is the curse of being black and poor, and it is a curse that follows you from generation to generation. My mother calls it “the black tax.” Because the generations who came before you have been pillaged, rather than being free to use your skills and education to move forward, you lose everything just trying to bring everyone behind you back up to zero. Working for the family in Soweto, my mom had no more freedom than she’d had in Transkei, so she ran away. She ran all the way down to the train station and jumped on a train and disappeared into the city, determined to sleep in public restrooms and rely on the kindness of prostitutes until she could make her own way in the world. —”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“Nelson Mandela once said, “If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.” He was so right.”
Trevor Noah, Born A Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“The whole issue of Santa Claus is a rather contentious one when it comes to African Christmas, a matter of pride. When an African dad buys his kid a present, the last thing he’s going to do is give some fat white man credit for it. African Dad will tell you straight up, “No, no, no. I bought you that.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“We live in a world where we don't see the ramifications of what we do to others, because we don't live with them. It would be a whole lot harder for an investment banker to rip off people with subprime mortgages if he actually had to live with the people he was ripping off. If we could see one another's pain and empathize with one another, it would never be worth it to us to commit the crimes in the first place.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood
“Being chosen is the greatest gift you can give to another human being”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood
“When you love someone you create a new world for them.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“The weird thing about these gangsters was that they were all, at a glance, identical. They drove the same red sports car. They dated the same beautiful eighteen-year-old girls. It was strange. It was like they didn’t have personalities; they shared a personality. One could be the other, and the other could be the one. They’d each studied how to be that gangster.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“But aren’t you afraid?” I’d say. “There’s only one of you and there’s so many of them.” “Honey, I’m not alone,” she’d say. “I’ve got all of Heaven’s angels behind me.” “Well, it would be nice if we could see them,” I’d say. “Because I don’t think the rioters know they’re there.” She’d tell me not to worry. She always came back to the phrase she lived by: “If God is with me, who can be against me?” She was never scared. Even when she should have been.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“Growing up the way I did, I learned how easy it is for white people to get comfortable with a system that awards them all the perks. I”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“As a kid I understood that people were different colors, but in my head white and black and brown were like types of chocolate. Dad was the white chocolate, mom was the dark chocolate, and I was the milk chocolate. But we were all just chocolate. I didn’t know any of it had anything to do with “race.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“A YOUNG MAN’S LONG, AWKWARD, OCCASIONALLY TRAGIC, AND FREQUENTLY HUMILIATING EDUCATION IN AFFAIRS OF THE HEART, PART I: VALENTINE’S DAY It”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“Fufi was the love of my life. Beautiful but stupid.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“Our toilet was in a corrugated-iron outhouse shared among the adjoining houses. Inside, there was a concrete slab with a hole in it and a plastic toilet seat on top; there had been a lid at some point, but it had broken and disappeared long ago. We couldn’t afford toilet paper, so on the wall next to the seat was a wire hanger with old newspaper on it for you to wipe. The newspaper was uncomfortable, but at least I stayed informed while I handled my business.”
Trevor Noah, Born A Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“If you add up how much you read in a year on the Internet—tweets, Facebook posts, lists—you’ve read the equivalent of a shit ton of books, but in fact you’ve read no books in a year.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“When you strike a woman, you strike a rock.”
Trevor Noah, Born A Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“For the first time in my life I had money, and it was the most liberating thing in the world. The first thing I learned about having money was that it gives you choices. People don’t want to be rich. They want to be able to choose. The richer you are, the more choices you have. That is the freedom of money. With”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“I shied away from any type of photograph ... because I thought I was hideous, because in my eyes I was. I had giant nodules on my face, around my neck, and the puss would ooze out of them. I had to go on medication repeatedly and the medication makes you suicidal and depressed and then you have to go off it because of your kidneys. It was just such a trying time.

In school that's your cache; how you look and what you can do determine everything in school. ... I was one of those kids who just stayed in a corner and watched the world pass them by. And I think, if anything, the biggest knock you experience in that world is — in terms of your identity — is you feel like you are less than you are, you feel like you don't have the right to belong. You're watching the world and the world exists without you.”
Trevor Noah
“We spend so much time being afraid of failure, afraid of rejection. But regret is the thing we should fear most. Failure is an answer. Rejection is an answer. Regret is an eternal question you will never have the answer to. "What if..." "If only..." "I wonder what would have..." You will never, never know, and it will haunt you for the rest of your days.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood
“Once Fufi saw Panther she came right away. The dogs left with us and we walked. I sobbed the whole way home, still heartbroken. My mom had no time for my whining. “Why are you crying?!” “Because Fufi loves another boy.” “So? Why would that hurt you? It didn’t cost you anything. Fufi’s here. She still loves you. She’s still your dog. So get over it.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“People love to say, “Give a man a fish, and he’ll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he’ll eat for a lifetime.” What they don’t say is, “And it would be nice if you gave him a fishing rod.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“Once Fufi saw Panther she came right away. The dogs left with us and we walked. I sobbed the whole way home, still heartbroken. My mom had no time for my whining. “Why are you crying?!” “Because Fufi loves another boy.” “So? Why would that hurt you? It didn’t cost you anything. Fufi’s here. She still loves you. She’s still your dog. So get over it.” Fufi was my first heartbreak. No one has ever betrayed me more than Fufi. It was a valuable lesson to me. The hard thing was understanding that Fufi wasn’t cheating on me with another boy. She was merely living her life to the fullest. Until I knew that she was going out on her own during the day, her other relationship hadn’t affected me at all. Fufi had no malicious intent.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“home”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“You’re trying to teach him a lesson, and now that lesson is the rest of his life.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“Relationships are built in the silences. You”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime and Other Stories
“All nonwhites were systematically classified into various groups and subgroups. Then these groups were given differing levels of rights and privileges in order to keep them at odds.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
“Growing up in a home of abuse, you struggle with the notion that you can love a person you hate, or hate a person you love. It’s a strange feeling. You want to live in a world where someone is good or bad, where you either hate them or love them, but that’s not how people are.”
Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood


All Quotes | Add A Quote


Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood Born a Crime
196,044 ratings
Open Preview
It's Trevor Noah: Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood (Adapted for Young Readers) It's Trevor Noah
45 ratings
Open Preview
Place of Gold: Coming of Age with South Africa Place of Gold
38 ratings
Chameleon Chameleon
1 rating