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“My take on socialism is this: Socialism only seems to work when you don't fully implement it, when you keep enough capitalism around to pay socialism's bills, at least for a time. It's the difference between milking the cow and killing it. Socialism has no theory of wealth creation; it's just a destructive, envy-driven fantasy about redistributing it after something else (and somebody else) creates it first.”
Lawrence W. Reed
“It constantly amazes me that defenders of the free market are expected to offer certainty and perfection while government has only to make promises and express good intentions. Many times, for instance, I’ve heard people say, "A free market in education is a bad idea because some child somewhere might fall through the cracks," even though in today’s government school, millions of children are falling through the cracks every day.”
Lawrence W. Reed
“Collectivists see the world the way Mr. Magoo did—as one big blur. They homogenize people in a communal blender, sacrificing the discrete features that make us who we are.”
Lawrence W. Reed
“Have you ever noticed how statists are constantly “reforming” their own handiwork? Education reform. Health-care reform. Welfare reform. Tax reform. The very fact they’re always busy “reforming” is an implicit admission that they didn’t get it right the first 50 times.”
Lawrence W. Reed
“Are you for peace? The great test of your devotion to peace is not how many words you utter on its behalf. It’s not even how you propose to deal with people of other countries, though that certainly tells us something. To fully measure your “peacefulness” requires that we examine how you propose to treat people in your own backyard. Do you demand more of what doesn’t belong to you? Do you endorse the use of force to punish people for victimless “crimes”? Do you support politicians who promise to seize the earnings of others to pay for your bailout, your subsidy, your student loan, your child’s education or whatever pet cause or project you think is more important than what your fellow citizens might personally prefer to spend their own money on? Do you believe theft is OK if it’s for a good cause or endorsed by a majority? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then have the courage to admit that peace is not your priority. How can I trust your foreign policy if your domestic policy requires so much to be done at gunpoint?”
Lawrence W. Reed
“In politics, the connection between what you pay for and what you actually get is problematic at best...
This is another way of asserting that your vote in the marketplace counts for so much more than your vote in the polling booth. Cast your dollars for the washing machine of your choice and that is what you get--nothing more and nothing less. Pull the lever for the politician of your choice and, most of the time (if you're lucky), you will get some of what you do want and much of what you don't. The votes of a special interest lobby may ultimately cancel out yours. As someone much wiser than me once said, "[P]olitics may not be the oldest profession, but the results are often the same."


Lawrence W. Reed
“("A Free Market in Education: The Answer to Prayer, And Other Issues")
No matter where you are on the issue, there is no solution to it within a government school context, only perpetual conflict. The answer involves choice, competition and private alternatives. If you don't like what a business offers, you don't argue endlessly about it; you walk across the street. Why is this principle so complicated for some people?”
Lawrence W. Reed
“The progressive intellectuals and their followers are in awe of what they think they might accomplish through the use of government power. They might benefit if they stopped to smell the roses. Like the rest of the natural world, what real life in a free environment actually accomplishes is much more awesome.”
Lawrence W. Reed, Excuse Me, Professor: Challenging the Myths of Progressivism
“Some economists have estimated that the NRA boosted the cost of doing business by an average of 40 percent — not something a depressed economy needed for recovery.”
Lawrence W. Reed, Great Myths of the Great Depression
“In the six months after the law took effect, industrial production dropped 25 percent. Benjamin M. Anderson writes, “NRA was not a revival measure. It was an anti-revival measure … Through the whole of the NRA period industrial production did not rise as high as it had been in July 1933, before NRA came in.”25”
Lawrence W. Reed, Great Myths of the Great Depression
“In surveys, a majority consistently rank FDR near the top of the list for presidential greatness, so it is likely they would reject the notion that the New Deal was responsible for prolonging the Great Depression. But when a nationally representative poll by the American Institute of Public Opinion in the spring of 1939 asked, “Do you think the attitude of the Roosevelt administration toward business is delaying business recovery?” the American people responded “yes” by a margin of more than 2-to-1. The business community felt even more strongly so.”
Lawrence W. Reed, Great Myths of the Great Depression
“Because you can't redistribute anything to anybody if it's not created by somebody in the first place,”
Lawrence Reed, Rendering Unto Caesar: Was Jesus a Socialist?
“Life, liberty, and property do not exist because men have made laws,” Bastiat reasoned. “On the contrary, it was the fact that life, liberty, and property existed beforehand that caused men to make laws in the first place.”
Lawrence W. Reed, Real Heroes
“other words, the meaningful conversation we should be having is about absolute poverty, not relative poverty. In so many of the discussions about income inequality,”
Lawrence W. Reed, Excuse Me, Professor: Challenging the Myths of Progressivism
“In the first year of the New Deal, Roosevelt proposed spending $10 billion while revenues were only $3 billion. Between 1933 and 1936, government expenditures rose by more than 83 percent. Federal debt skyrocketed by 73 percent.”
Lawrence W. Reed, Great Myths of the Great Depression
“Socialist historian Gabriel Kolko, who argues in The Triumph of Conservatism that the forces of competition in the free market of the late 1800s were too potent to allow Standard to cheat the public, stresses that “Standard treated the consumer with deference. Crude and refined oil prices for consumers declined during the period Standard exercised greatest control of the industry.” Standard”
Lawrence W. Reed, Excuse Me, Professor: Challenging the Myths of Progressivism
“In summary, let me quote Professor McGee once again:           Judging from the Record, Standard Oil did not use predatory price discrimination to drive out competing refiners, nor did its pricing practice have that effect . . . I am convinced that Standard did not systematically, if ever, use local price cutting in retailing, or anywhere else, to reduce competition. To do so would have been foolish; and, whatever else has been said about them, the old Standard organization was seldom criticized for making less money when it could readily have made more. A”
Lawrence W. Reed, Excuse Me, Professor: Challenging the Myths of Progressivism
“Some defenders of FDR, such as economist Paul Krugman, blame the 1937–38 collapse on a reduction in government spending. In typical Keynesian fashion, they claim that the economy tanked that year because the president, after nearly doubling federal spending in his first term, caved to GOP demands to rein in expenditures. But in real terms, the reduction was puny — less than 1 percent of GDP. Even by Keynesian standards, this blip could hardly have produced the ensuing one-third decline in industrial production.”
Lawrence W. Reed, Great Myths of the Great Depression
“The Wagner Act, or National Labor Relations Act, was passed in reaction to the Supreme Court’s voidance of NRA and its labor codes. It aimed at crushing all employer resistance to labor unions. Anything an employer might do in self-defense became an “unfair labor practice” punishable by the Board. The law not only obliged employers to deal and bargain with the unions designated as the employees’ representative; later Board decisions also made it unlawful to resist the demands of labor union leaders.34”
Lawrence W. Reed, Great Myths of the Great Depression
“During a period of barely two months during late 1937, the market for steel — a key economic barometer — plummeted from 83 percent of capacity to 35 percent. When that news emblazoned headlines, Roosevelt took an ill-timed nine-day fishing trip. The New York Herald Tribune implored him to get back to work to stem the tide of the renewed Depression. What was needed, said the newspaper’s editors, was a reversal of the Roosevelt policy “of bitterness and hate, of setting class against class and punishing all who disagreed with him.”38”
Lawrence W. Reed, Great Myths of the Great Depression
“Under Roosevelt, the top rate was raised at first to 79 percent and then later to 90 percent. Economic historian Burton Folsom notes that in 1941 Roosevelt even proposed a whopping 99.5-percent marginal rate on all incomes over $100,000. “Why not?” he said when an advisor questioned the idea.40”
Lawrence W. Reed, Great Myths of the Great Depression
“Rexford Guy Tugwell, one of the architects of Franklin Roosevelt’s policies of the 1930s, explained, “We didn’t admit it at the time, but practically the whole New Deal was extrapolated from programs that Hoover started.” To”
Lawrence W. Reed, Excuse Me, Professor: Challenging the Myths of Progressivism
“Can any serious scholar observe the Hoover administration’s massive economic intervention and, with a straight face, pronounce the inevitably deleterious effects as the fault of free markets? Franklin”
Lawrence W. Reed, Excuse Me, Professor: Challenging the Myths of Progressivism
“Roosevelt secured passage of the Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA), which levied a new tax on agricultural processors and used the revenue to supervise the wholesale destruction of valuable crops and cattle. Federal agents oversaw the ugly spectacle of perfectly good fields of cotton, wheat, and corn being plowed under. Healthy cattle, sheep, and pigs by the millions were slaughtered and buried in mass graves. Even if the AAA had helped farmers by curtailing supplies and raising prices, it could have done so only by hurting millions of others who had to pay those prices or make do with less to eat. Perhaps”
Lawrence W. Reed, Excuse Me, Professor: Challenging the Myths of Progressivism
“•  The Hoover administration took a recession and made it a depression by dramatically choking off world trade through higher tariffs and doubling the income tax        •  Franklin Roosevelt promised to undo Hoover’s spending and tax increases but after he was elected, he did just the opposite        •”
Lawrence W. Reed, Excuse Me, Professor: Challenging the Myths of Progressivism


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