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Lawrence M. Krauss quotes (showing 1-30 of 118)

“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded. And, the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics: You are all stardust. You couldn’t be here if stars hadn’t exploded, because the elements - the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, all the things that matter for evolution and for life - weren’t created at the beginning of time. They were created in the nuclear furnaces of stars, and the only way for them to get into your body is if those stars were kind enough to explode. So, forget Jesus. The stars died so that you could be here today.”
Lawrence M. Krauss
“The amazing thing is that every atom in your body came from a star that exploded. And, the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics: You are all stardust. You couldn’t be here if stars hadn’t exploded, because the elements - the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, all the things that matter for evolution - weren’t created at the beginning of time. They were created in the nuclear furnaces of stars, and the only way they could get into your body is if those stars were kind enough to explode. So, forget Jesus. The stars died so that you could be here today.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing
“The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it”
Lawrence M. Krauss
“In 5 billion years, the expansion of the universe will have progressed to the point where all other galaxies will have receded beyond detection. Indeed, they will be receding faster than the speed of light, so detection will be impossible. Future civilizations will discover science and all its laws, and never know about other galaxies or the cosmic background radiation. They will inevitably come to the wrong conclusion about the universe......We live in a special time, the only time, where we can observationally verify that we live in a special time.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing
“A universe without purpose should neither depress us nor suggest that our lives are purposeless. Through an awe-inspiring cosmic history we find ourselves on this remote planet in a remote corner of the universe, endowed with intelligence and self-awareness. We should not despair, but should humbly rejoice in making the most of these gifts, and celebrate our brief moment in the sun.”
Lawrence M. Krauss
“You couldn't be here if stars hadn't exploded. Because the elements, the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, all the things that matter for evolution weren't created at the beginning of time. They were created in the nuclear furnaces of stars. And the only way they could get into your body is if the stars were kind enough to explode.

So forget Jesus. The stars died so that you could be here today.”
Lawrence M. Krauss
“If we wish to draw philosophical conclusions about our own existence, our significance, and the significance of the universe itself, our conclusions should be based on empirical knowledge. A truly open mind means forcing our imaginations to conform to the evidence of reality, and not vice versa, whether or not we like the implications.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing
“Forget Jesus, the stars died so you could be born.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing
“Lack of comfort means we are on the threshold of new insights.”
Lawrence M. Krauss
“The universe is the way it is , whether we like
it or not. The existence or nonexistence of a creator is independent
of our desires . A world without God or purpose may seem harsh
or pointless, but that alone doesn ' t require God to actually exist.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing
“I like to say that while antimatter may seem strange, it is strange in the sense that Belgians are strange. They are not really strange; it is just that one rarely meets them.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing
“every atom in your body came from a star that exploded. and, the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. it really is the most poetic thing i know about physics: you are all stardust.”
Lawrence M. Krauss
“[I]n science we have to be particularly cautious about 'why' questions. When we ask, 'Why?' we usually mean 'How?' If we can answer the latter, that generally suffices for our purposes. For example, we might ask: 'Why is the Earth 93 million miles from the Sun?' but what we really probably mean is, 'How is the Earth 93 million miles from the Sun?' That is, we are interested in what physical processes led to the Earth ending up in its present position. 'Why' implicitly suggests purpose, and when we try to understand the solar system in scientific terms, we do not generally ascribe purpose to it.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing
“Of course, supernatural acts are what miracles are all about. They are, after all, precisely those things that circumvent the laws of nature. A god who can create the laws of nature can presumably also circumvent them at will. Although why they would have been circumvented so liberally thousands of years ago, before the invention of modern communication instruments that could have recorded them, and not today, is still something to wonder about.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing
“No matter where you go, there you are.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, The Physics of Star Trek
“Now, almost one hundred years later, it is difficult to fully appreciate how much our picture of the universe has changed in the span of a single human lifetime.

As far as the scientific community in 1917 was concerned, the universe was static and eternal, and consisted of a one single galaxy, our Milky Way, surrounded by vast, infinite, dark, and empty space.

This is, after all, what you would guess by looking up at the night sky with your eyes, or with a small telescope, and at the time there was little reason to suspect otherwise.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing
“One of the most poetic facts I know about the universe is that essentially every atom in your body was once inside a star that exploded. Moreover, the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than did those in your right. We are all, literally, star children, and our bodies made of stardust.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing
“A physicist, an engineer and a psychologist are called in as consultants to a dairy farm whose production has been below par. Each is given time to inspect the details of the operation before making a report.
The first to be called is the engineer, who states: "The size of the stalls for the cattle should be decreased. Efficiency could be improved if the cows were more closely packed, with a net allotment of 275 cubic feet per cow. Also, the diameter of the milking tubes should be increased by 4 percent to allow for a greater average flow rate during the milking periods."
The next to report is the psychologist, who proposes:
"The inside of the barn should be painted green. This is a more mellow color than brown and should help induce greater milk flow. Also, more trees should be planted in the fields to add diversity to the scenery for the cattle during grazing, to reduce boredom."
Finally, the physicist is called upon. He asks for a blackboard and then draws a circle. He begins: "Assume the cow is a sphere....”
Lawrence M. Krauss, Fear of Physics: A Guide for the Perplexed
“The real thing that physics tell us about the universe is that it's big, rare event happens all the time — including life — and that doesn't mean it's special.”
Lawrence M. Krauss
“Metaphysical speculation is independent of the physical validity of the Big Bang itself and is irrelevant to our understanding of it.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing
“I should point out, nevertheless, that even though incomplete data can lead to a false picture, this is far different from the (false) picture obtained by those who choose to ignore empirical data to invent a picture of reality (young earthers, for example), or those who instead require the existence of something for which there is no observable evidence whatsoever (like divine intelligence) to reconcile their view of creation with their a priori prejudices, or worse still, those who cling to fairly tales about nature that presume the answers before questions can even be asked.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing
“Reality doesn’t owe us comfort.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing
“I don’t mind not knowing. It doesn’t scare me. —RICHARD FEYNMAN”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing
“The universe is the way it is, whether we like it or not. The existence or nonexistence of a creator is independent of our desires. A world without God or purpose may seem harsh or pointless, but that alone doesn’t require God to actually exist.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing
“Dream or nightmare, we have to live our experience as it is, and we have to live it awake.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing
“Edwin Hubble, who continues to give me great faith in humanity, because he started out as a lawyer and then became an astronomer.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing
“To be scientifically illiterate is to remain essentially uncultured. And the chief virtue of a cultural activity--be it art, music, literature, or science--is the way it enriches our lives.”
Lawrence M. Krauss
“To argue that, in a universe in which there seems to be no purpose, our existence is without meaning or value is unparalleled solipsism, as it suggests that without us the universe is worthless. The greatest gift that science can give us is to allow us to overcome our need to be the center of existence even as we learn to appreciate the wonder of the accident we are privileged to witness.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, The Greatest Story Ever Told—So Far: Why Are We Here?
“A truly open mind means forcing our imaginations to conform to the evidence of reality, and not vice versa, whether or not we like the implications.”
Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing
“Their mutual gravitational attraction will ultimately cause them to collapse inward, in manifest disagreement with an apparently static universe.”
Lawrence M. Krauss

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