Goodreads helps you follow your favorite authors. Be the first to learn about new releases!
Start by following David B. Givens.

David B. Givens David B. Givens > Quotes


David B. Givens quotes (showing 1-20 of 20)

“A recent invention, vocal language may date back only ca. 200,000 years. As human primates, we have not fully come to grips with the prolonged, face-to-face closeness required for speech. Speaking to a stranger, e.g., stresses our autonomic nervous system's sympathetic (i.e., fight-or-flight) division, which a. speeds our heartbeat, b. dilates our pupils, and c. cools and moistens our hands. The limbic brain's hypothalamus instructs the pituitary gland to release hormones into the circulatory system, arousing our blood, sweat, and fears.”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“Women are superior to men in decoding nonverbal cues (Rosenthal and DePaulo 1979).”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“Yo-yo (Tagalog for "come back") evolved from a Philippine hunting tool made from a softball-size stone tied to a length of plant vine or a leather thong which enabled throwers to retrieve the weapon with a simple flick of the wrist (Hoffman 1996). The modern yo-yo thus has a great deal of physics, prehistory, and hunting lore encoded in its maple, beech, or plastic form (see below, Neuro-notes III).”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“When we create an artifact such as a tool, we leave a physical trace of our thoughts" (Hauser 2000:22)”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“As the brain and body were shaped by natural selection, consumer goods adapted to the mind through a parallel process of product selection, which has rendered them ever more fluent, expressive, and fascinating to our senses.”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“Humans are what they are today because their ancestors followed a knowledge path. At every branch in the 500-million-year-old tree of vertebrate evolution, the precursors of humanity opted for brains over brawn, speed, size, or any lesser adaptation. Whenever the option of intelligent response or pre-programmed reaction presented itself, a single choice was made: Be smart.”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“Though we may show a polite grin or camera smile at will, the zygomatic or heartfelt smile is hard to produce on demand. While the former cue may be consciously manipulated (and is subject to deception), the latter is controlled by emotion. Thus, the zygomatic smile is a more accurate reflection of mood.”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“Feedback smile. Smiling itself produces a weak feeling of happiness. The facial feedback hypothesis proposes that ". . . involuntary facial movements provide sufficient peripheral information to drive emotional experience" (Bernstein et al. 2000). According to Davis and Palladino (2000), ". . . feedback from facial expression [e.g., smiling or frowning] affects emotional expression and behavior." In one study, e.g., participants were instructed to hold a pencil in their mouths, either between their lips or between their teeth. The latter, who were able to smile, rated cartoons funnier than did the former, who could not smile (Davis and Palladino 2000).”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“1. We crave meaty taste because the amphibian brain's hunger for flesh is older than the primate brain's "acquired taste" for fruits and nuts. 2. As it influenced the pursuit, handling, and killing of game, the amygdala also stimulated the release of digestive juices in preparation for eating the kill. Thus, today, hidden aggressiveness in the meat-eater's code makes a sizzling steak more exciting than a bowl of fruit. This explains, in part, why (when possible and affordable) meals throughout the world are planned around a meat dish.”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“In private life, human beings spend a great deal of time in seclusion behind closed doors (e.g., in bathrooms and bedrooms) and other partitions designed to shield their bodies from prying eyes. Scientists have determined that too much visual monitoring can be harmful to human health.”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“Many scientists (the most notable being Albert Einstein) think in visual, spatial, and physical images rather than in mathematical terms and words. (N.B.: That the theoretical physicist, Stephen Hawking, used an arboreal term to picture the cosmos [i.e., affirming that the universe "could have different branches,"] is a tribute to his [very visual] primate brain.)”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“Observations. 1. To see Nonverbal World on TV, mute the sound (gestures and body movements become clearer). 2. To hear emotion on the phone, listen with your left ear (the right brain responds to feelings and moods). 3. To feel the smoothness of silk, flannel, and flesh, touch with your left hand (the right sensory strip is more emotional than the left [in right-handed people; the reverse is (partly) true in lefties]).”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“Supermarket mandatory smile. In the late 1990s, Safeway, the second largest supermarket chain in the U.S., instructed its store employees to smile and greet customers with direct eye contact. In 1998, USA Today ("Safeway's Mandatory Smiles Pose Danger, Workers Say") reported that 12 female employees had filed grievances over the chain's smile-and-eye-contact policy, after numerous male customers reportedly had propositioned them for dates. Commenting on the grievances, a Safeway official stated, "We don't see it [the males' sexual overtures] as a direct result of our initiative.”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“Unlike most other facial signs of emotion, the smile is subject to learning and conscious control. In the U.S., Japan, and many other societies, children are taught to smile on purpose, e.g., in a courteous greeting, whether or not they actually feel happy.”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“The two-point rhythm of walking's stride clears the mind for thinking. (N.B.: Perhaps, after telling the spinal circuits to "take a walk," the forebrain shifts to automatic pilot, so to speak, freeing the neocortex to ponder important issues of the day.) Many philosophers were lifetime walkers, who found that bipedal rhythms facilitated creative contemplation and thought. In his short life, e.g., Henry David Thoreau walked an estimated 250,000 miles--ten times the circumference of earth.”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“A growing body of evidence suggests that teaching babies ASL may improve their ability to speak. Again, this indicates a link between manual signing and vocal speech. Babies express cognitive abilities through certain hand gestures (e.g., by pointing with the index finger) earlier than they do through articulated words (the latter require more refined oral motor skills, which very young babies do not yet possess).”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“EXPECTANCY THEORY
Conceptual model. The hypothesis - also known as expectancy communication or interpersonal expectancy effects - that a person's nonverbal communication unwittingly scripts a recipient's behavior, deportment, or performance in the manner of a self-fulfilling prophecy.”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“New psychological research suggests that air rage, road rage and other seemingly irrational outbursts of wild-eyed, foaming- at-the-mouth fury could be extreme reactions to the violation of a set of rules that choreographs our every waking moment: the unwritten, unconscious system of personal body space. Mounting evidence shows that we all need this space to stay sane.
"We walk around in a sort of invisible bubble," says Phil Leather, head of Nottingham University's social and environmental research group. "It's egg-shaped, because we allow people to come closer from in front than behind - an entire language is expressed via the amount of distance we choose to keep between each other.”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“Their combined verbal and nonverbal IQs make hands our most expressive body parts. Hands have more to say even than faces, for not only do fingers show emotion, depict ideas, and point to butterflies on the wing--they can also read Braille, speak in sign languages, and write poetry. Our hands are such incredibly gifted communicators that they always bear watching.”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues
“Our face is exquisitely expressive. Its features are incredibly mobile, more so than any other primate's. Because our face "speaks for itself" with muscular eloquence and candor, speech has comparatively few words (such as, e.g., "smile," "pout," or "frown") for its diverse gestures (see, e.g., TENSE-MOUTH and TONGUE-SHOW, which lack dictionary entries). Emotionally, the face is mightier than the word.”
David B. Givens, The NONVERBAL DICTIONARY of gestures, signs and body language cues


All Quotes | Add A Quote
Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game

Love Signals: How to attract the perfect mate! Love Signals
0 ratings