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Chris Hadfield quotes Showing 91-120 of 215

“what really matters is not the value someone else assigns to a task but how I personally feel while performing it.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Egyes űrhajósok elmerülnek a múló dicsőség ingoványában, de ők jelentik a kivételt. Több mint 500 embernek volt már lehetősége odafentről látni a bolygónkat. Úgy tűnik, hogy a legtöbbjükben ez az élmény megerősítette vagy kifejlesztette az alázat érzését. A sarki fény vibráló, táncoló tüneménye, a Bahamákat legyezőszerűen körülvevő sekély, sziklás tenger káprázatos kéksége, a hurrikán élesen kirajzolódó szeme körül dühödten tajtékzó, hatalmas felhőörvény - az egész világ látványa gyökeresen átalakítja a szemléletünket. Nemcsak félelemmel vegyes bámulatot ébreszt, hanem mélységes alázatot is kelt.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“No one wants to go to space with a jerk. But at some point, you just have to accept the people in your crew, stop wishing you were flying with Neil Armstrong, and start figuring out how your crewmates’ strengths and weaknesses mesh with your own. You can’t change the bricks, and together, you still have to build a w”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Early success is a terrible teacher. You’re essentially being rewarded for a lack of preparation, so when you find yourself in a situation where you must prepare, you can’t do it. You don’t know h”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“It’s never either-or, never enjoyment versus advancement, so long as you conceive of advancement in terms of learning rather than climbing to the next rung of the professional ladder. You are getting ahead if you learn, even if you wind up staying on the same rung.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Things aren't scary. People are scared.”
Chris Hadfield
“No matter how competent or how seasoned, every astronaut is essentially a perpetual student, forever cramming for the next test. It's not how I envisioned things when I was 9 years old. Then I dreamed of blasting off in a blaze of glory to explore the universe, not sitting in a classroom studying orbital mechanics. In Russian.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Nothing boosts confidence quite like simulating a disaster, engaging with it fully, both physically and intellectually, and realising you have the ability to work the problem.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“The windows of a spaceship casually frame miracles, every 92 minutes, another sunrise: a layer cake that starts with orange, then a thick wedge of blue, then the richest, darkest icing decorated with stars. The secret patterns of our planet are revealed: mountains bump up rudely from orderly plains, forests are green gashes edged with snow, rivers glint in the sunlight, twisting and turning like silvery worms. Continents splay themselves out whole, surrounded by islands sprinkled across the sea like delicate shards of shattered eggshells.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Feeling ready to do something doesn’t mean feeling certain you’ll succeed, though of course that’s what you’re hoping to do. Truly being ready means understanding what could go wrong—and having a plan to deal with it.”
Chris Hadfield
“An astronaut is someone who’s able to make good decisions quickly, with incomplete information, when the consequences really matter. I didn’t miraculously become one either, after just eight days in space. But I did get in touch with the fact that I didn’t even know what I didn’t know.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Space flight participants, commonly known as space tourists, pay between $20 and $40 million each to leave Earth for 10 days or so and go to the International Space Station (ISS) via Soyuz, the compact Russian rocket that is now the only way for humans to get to the ISS.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Kazakhstan is not easy to get to unless you live in Kyrgyzstan.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“In my experience, fear comes from not knowing what to expect and not feeling you have any control over what's about to happen. When you feel helpless, you're far more afraid than you would be if you knew the facts. If you're not sure what to be alarmed about, everything is alarming.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Every crew brings its own small, tethered "g meter", a toy or figurine we hang in front of us so we know when we are weightless. Ours was Klyopa, a small knitted doll based on a character in a Russian children's television program, courtesy of Anastasia, Roman's 9-year-old daughter. When the string that was holding her suddenly slackened and she began to drift upward, I had a feeling I'd never felt before in space: I'd come home.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Explorers gave their lives trying to find the source of the Nile, but I could detect it with a casual glance, no effort at all.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“I think one reason people like hearing about these sorts of things is that it helps them see the world slightly differently, perhaps even with a sense of wonder. On Earth, it's just a given that if you put a fork on the table, it will stay there. But remove that one variable, gravity, and everything changes. Forks waft away; people sleep on air. Eating, jumping, drinking from a cup – things you've known how to do since you were a toddler suddenly become magical or tricky or endlessly entertaining, and sometimes all three at once. People like being reminded that the impossible really is possible, I think, and I was happy to be able to remind them.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“An astronaut is someone who’s able to make good decisions quickly, with incomplete information, when the consequences really matter.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Mission Control Center (MCC) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) has got to be one of the most formidable and intellectually stimulating classrooms in the world. Everyone in the room has hard-won expertise in a particular technical area, and they are like spiders, exquisitely sensitive to any vibration in their webs, ready to pounce on problems and efficiently dispose of them.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“But I wasn’t lonely. Loneliness, I think, has very little to do with location. It’s a state of mind. In the center of every big, bustling city are some of the loneliest people in the world. I’ve never felt that way in space. If anything, because our whole planet was on display just outside the window, I felt even more aware of and connected to the seven billion other people who call it home.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“If I'd defined success very narrowly, limiting it to peak, high-visibility experiences, I would have felt very unsuccessful and unhappy during those years. Life is just a lot better if you feel you're having 10 wins a day rather than a win every 10 years or so.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Floating past the Soyuz TV screen, I noticed we were over the Pacific, off the Chilean coast. At the window, I saw few lights: fishing boats, I thought. Then they resolved themselves: the Southern Cross. I was looking at a constellation in the night sky, not the sea! It was a strange delight to be that disconcerted while simultaneously at ease.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Astronauts are taught that the best way to reduce stress is to sweat the small stuff.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“When Chris talks, he has a very clear and authoritative manner—but don’t let yourself be lulled into a feeling of complete confidence that he’s right. Yes, he used to be a spacewalking instructor and evaluator and he’s Mr. EVA, but he hasn’t done a walk since 2001. There have been a lot of changes since then. I don’t want the junior trainers to ignore that little voice inside and not question something just because it’s being said with authority by someone who’s been here a long time.” At”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Ultimately, leadership is not about glorious crowning acts. It’s about keeping your team focused on a goal and motivated to do their best to achieve it, especially when the stakes are high and the consequences really matter.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“But if seeing 16 sunrises a day and all of Earth's variety steadily on display for five months had taught me anything, it was that there are always more challenges and opportunities out there than time to experience them.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“I still had a lot to learn, and I’d have to learn it the same place everyone learns to be an astronaut: right here on Earth.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Preparation is not only about managing external risks, but about limiting the likelihood that you’ll unwittingly add to them.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“Sharpie—the preferred writing utensil on orbit since you can hold it any which way and it still works.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
“In a crisis, the “why” is irrelevant.”
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth


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