Memories, Dreams, Reflections Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
Memories, Dreams, Reflections Memories, Dreams, Reflections by C.G. Jung
13,688 ratings, 4.18 average rating, 348 reviews
Open Preview
Memories, Dreams, Reflections Quotes (showing 1-16 of 16)
“As a child I felt myself to be alone, and I am still, because I know things and must hint at things which others apparently know nothing of, and for the most part do not want to know.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“The acceptance of oneself is the essence of the whole moral problem and the epitome of a whole outlook on life. That I feed the hungry, that I forgive an insult, that I love my enemy in the name of Christ -- all these are undoubtedly great virtues. What I do unto the least of my brethren, that I do unto Christ. But what if I should discover that the least among them all, the poorest of all the beggars, the most impudent of all the offenders, the very enemy himself -- that these are within me, and that I myself stand in need of the alms of my own kindness -- that I myself am the enemy who must be loved -- what then? As a rule, the Christian's attitude is then reversed; there is no longer any question of love or long-suffering; we say to the brother within us "Raca," and condemn and rage against ourselves. We hide it from the world; we refuse to admit ever having met this least among the lowly in ourselves.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“Nights through dreams tell the myths forgotten by the day.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“The decisive question for man is: Is he related to something infinite or not? That is the telling question of his life. Only if we know that the thing which truly matters is the infinite can we avoid fixing our interests upon futilities, and upon all kinds of goals which are not of real importance. Thus we demand that the world grant us recognition for qualities which we regard as personal possessions: our talent or our beauty. The more a man lays stress on false possessions, and the less sensitivity he has for what is essential, the less satisfying is his life. He feels limited because he has limited aims, and the result is envy and jealousy. If we understand and feel that here in this life we already have a link with the infinite, desires and attitudes change.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“My whole being was seeking for something still unknown which might confer meaning upon the banality of life.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“We no longer live on what we have, but on promises, no longer in the present day, but in the darkness of the future, which, we expect, will at last bring the proper sunrise. We refuse to recognize that everything better is purchased at the price of something worse; that, for example, the hope of grater freedom is canceled out by increased enslavement to the state, not to speak of the terrible perils to which the most brilliant discoveries of science expose us. The less we understand of what our [forebears] sought, the less we understand ourselves, and thus we help with all our might to rob the individual of his roots and his guiding instincts, so that he becomes a particle in the mass, ruled only by what Neitzche called the spirit of gravity. (p.236)”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“The sight of a child…will arouse certain longings in adult, civilized persons — longings which relate to the unfulfilled desires and needs of those parts of the personality which have been blotted out of the total picture in favor of the adapted persona.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“Life has always seemed to me like a plant that lives on its rhizome. Its true life is invisible, hidden in the rhizome. The part that appears above ground lasts only a single summer. Then it withers away—an ephemeral apparition. When we think of the unending growth and decay of life and civilizations, we cannot escape the impression of absolute nullity. Yet I have never lost a sense of something that lives and endures underneath the eternal flux. What we see is the blossom, which passes. The rhizome remains.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“Philemon and other figures of my fantasies brought home to me the crucial insight that there are things in the psyche which I do not produce, but which produce themselves and have their own life. Philemon represented a force which was not myself. In my fantasies I held conversations with him, and he said things which I had not consciously thought. For I observed clearly that it was he who spoke, not I. He said I treated thoughts as if I generated them myself, but in his view thoughts were like animals in the forest, or people in a room, or birds in the air, and added, “If you should see people in a room, you would not think that you had made those people, or that you were responsible for them.” It was he who taught me psychic objectivity, the reality of the psyche. Through him the distinction was clarified between myself and the object of my thought. He confronted me in an objective manner, and I understood that there is something in me which can say things that I do not know and do not intend, things which may even be directed against me.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“The dream shows the inner truth and reality of the patient as it really is: not as I conjecture it to be, and not as he would like it to be, but as it is.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“The less we understand of what our fathers and forefathers sought, the less we understand ourselves, and thus we help with all our might to rob the individual of his roots and his guiding instincts, so that he becomes a particle in the mass, ruled only by what Nietzsche called the spirit of gravity.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“Nepromišljeno jurimo za novotarijama, gonjeni sve snažnijim osjećajem nedostatnosti, nezadovoljstva i nemira. Više ne živimo od onoga što imamo, nego od obećanja, više ne u svjetlosti današnjega dana, nego u tami budućnosti, koja će, kako očekujemo, napokon donijeti pravi izlazak sunca.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“Ciotka pałała świętym oburzeniem, jakby przegoniono ją przez instytut pornograficzny.

Gdy umarła, jej krewni powiedzieli mi, że w ostatnich miesiącach jej życia charakter jakby od niej odpadał kawałek po kawałku, aż w końcu dziewczyna powróciła do stanu dwuletniego dziecka i tak zapadła w swój ostatni sen.

Popadłbym w znany błąd autobiografów, który polega na tym, że albo snują iluzje, jak to być powinno, albo kreślą jakąś apologia pro vita sua. A przecież człowiek jest zdarzeniem, nie może ocenić samego siebie, lecz raczej - for better or worse - podlega osądowi innych.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“Moj život je ono što sam učinio, moje znanstveno djelo; jedno je nerazdvojivo od drugoga. Moje djelo je izraz moga unutarnjeg razvoja, jer posvećivanje sadržajima nesvjesnog oblikuje čovjeka i dovodi do njegovih preobrazbi. Moja se djela mogu smatrati postajama na životnom putu.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“Gdy umarła, jej krewni powiedzieli mi, że w ostatnich miesiącach jej życia charakter jakby od niej odpadał kawałek po kawałku, aż w końcu dziewczyna powróciła do stanu dwuletniego dziecka i tak zapadła w swój ostatni sen.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections
“Popadłbym w znany błąd autobiografów, który polega na tym, że albo snują iluzje, jak to być powinno, albo kreślą jakąś apologia pro vita sua. A przecież człowiek jest zdarzeniem, nie może ocenić samego siebie, lecz raczej - for better or worse - podlega osądowi innych.”
C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections

All Quotes
Quotes By C.G. Jung
Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game