Post Office Quotes

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Post Office Post Office by Charles Bukowski
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Post Office Quotes (showing 1-30 of 77)
“I wanted the whole world or nothing.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“In the morning it was morning and I was still alive.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“I wasn't much of a petty thief. I wanted the whole world or nothing.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“But now and then, a woman walks up, full blossom, a woman just bursting out of her dress…a sex creature, a curse, the end of it all.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“Can you remember who you were, before the world told you who you should be?”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“After dinner or lunch or whatever it was -- with my crazy 12-hour night I was no longer sure what was what -- I said, "Look, baby, I'm sorry, but don't you realize that this job is driving me crazy? Look, let's give it up. Let's just lay around and make love and take walks and talk a little. Let's go to the zoo. Let's look at animals. Let's drive down and look at the ocean. It's only 45 minutes. Let's play games in the arcades. Let's go to the races, the Art Museum, the boxing matches. Let's have friends. Let's laugh. This kind of life like everybody else's kind of life: it's killing us.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“In the morning it was morning and I was still alive.
Maybe I'll write a novel, I thought.
And then I did.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“Food is good for the nerves and the spirit. Courage comes from the belly – all else is desperation.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“Any damn fool can beg up some kind of job; it takes a wise man to make it without working.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
tags: work
“The blankets had fallen off and I stared down at her white back, the shoulder blades sticking out as if they wanted to grow into wings, poke through that skin. Little blades. She was helpless.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“It was sad, it was sad, it was sad. When Betty came back we didn't sing or laugh, or even argue. We sat drinking in the dark, smoking cigarettes, and when we went to sleep, I didn't put my feet on her body or she on mine like we used to. We slept without touching.
We had both been robbed.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“Fay had a spot of blood on the left side of her mouth and I took a wet cloth and wiped it off. Women were meant to suffer; no wonder they asked for constant declarations of love.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“WHAT'S WRONG WITH ASSHOLES, BABY? YOU'VE GOT AN ASSHOLE, I'VE GOT AN ASSHOLE! YOU GO TO THE STORE AND BUY A PORTERHOUSE STEAK, THAT HAD AN ASSHOLE! ASSHOLES COVER THE EARTH! IN A WAY TREES HAVE ASSHOLES BUT YOU CAN'T FIND THEM, THEY JUST DROP THEIR LEAVES. YOUR ASSHOLE, MY ASSHOLE, THE WORLD IS FULL OF BILLIONS OF ASSHOLES. THE PRESIDENT HAS AN ASSHOLE, THE CARWASH BOY HAS AN ASSHOLE, THE JUDGE AND THE MURDERER HAVE ASSHOLES . . . EVEN THE PURPLE STICKINPIN HAS AN ASSHOLE!”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“…He was always high on drugs. I was not a drug man, but in case I wanted to hide from myself for a few days, I knew I could get anything I wanted from him.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“Let' em learn or let' em die”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“Look, you're small-town. I've had over 50 jobs, maybe a hundred. I've never stayed anywhere long. What I am trying to say is, there is a certain game played in offices all over America. The people are bored, they don't know what to do, so they play the office-romance game. Most of the time it means nothing but the passing of time. Sometimes they do manage to work off a screw or two on the side. But even then, it is just an offhand pasttime, like bowling or t.v. or a New Year's Eve party. You've got to understand that it doesn't mean anything and then you won't get hurt. Do you understand what I mean?"

I think that Mr. Partisan is sincere."

You're going to get stuck with that pin, babe, don't forget what I told you. Watch those slicks. They are as phony as a lead dime.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“What's wrong with assholes, baby?”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“Courage comes from the belly - all else is desperation.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“I met Betty on the street.
"I saw you with that bitch a while back. She's not your kind of woman."
"None of them are.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“God or somebody keeps creating women and tossing them out on the streets, and this one’s ass is too big and that one’s tits are too small, and this one is mad and that one is crazy and that one is a religionist and that one reads tea leaves and this one can’t control her farts, and that one has this big nose, and that one has boney legs … But now and then, a woman walks up, full blossom, a woman just bursting out of her dress … a sex creature, a curse, the end of it all.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“Women were meant to suffer; no wonder they asked for constant declarations of love.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“The ocean," I said, "look at it out there, battering, crawling up and down. And underneath all that, the fish, the poor fish fighting each other, eating each other. We're like those fish, only we're up here. One bad move and you're finished. It's nice to be a champion. It's nice to know your moves.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“She seemed a bit crazy but I kept looking at her body and I didn't care.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“I went to the bathroom and threw some water on my face, combed my hair. If I could only comb that face, I thought, but I can't.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“I went home each night dizzy and sick. He was murdering me with the sound of his voice.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“I broke that town in half like a wooden match.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“God damn the geraniums! ...It was like trying to screw during an aerial attack.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“The first place smelled like work, so I took the second.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“MAILMAN CAUGHT DRINKING THE BLOOD OF GOD AND TAKING A SHOWER, NAKED, IN ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office
“I could stay here, I thought, make money at the track while she nurses me over the bad moments, rubs oil on my body, cooks for me, talks to me, goes to bed with me. Of course, there would always be arguments. That is the nature of a woman. They like the mutual exchange of dirty laundry, a bit of screaming, a bit of dramatics. Then an exchange of vows.”
Charles Bukowski, Post Office

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