Winter Dreams Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
Winter Dreams Winter Dreams by F. Scott Fitzgerald
885 ratings, 3.88 average rating, 51 reviews
Open Preview
Winter Dreams Quotes (showing 1-13 of 13)
“The helpless ecstasy of loosing himself in her charm was a powerful opiate rather than a tonic.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Winter Dreams
“For the first time in years the tears were streaming down his face. But they were for himself now. He did not care about mouth and eyes and moving hands. He wanted to care, and he could not care. For he had gone away and he could never go back any more. The gates were closed, the sun was gone down, and there was no beauty but the gray beauty of steel that withstands all time. Even the grief he could have borne was left behind in the country of illusion, of youth, of the richness of life, where his winter dreams had flourished.

"Long ago," he said, "long ago, there was something in me, but now that thing is gone. Now that thing is gone, that thing is gone. I cannot cry. I cannot care. That thing will come back no more.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Winter Dreams
“Long ago, there was something in me, but now that thing is gone. Now that thing is gone, that thing is gone. I cannot cry. I cannot care. That thing will come back no more.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Winter Dreams
“There was a pause. Then she smiled and the corners of her mouth drooped and an almost imperceptible sway brought her closer to him, looking up into his eyes. A lump rose in Dexter's throat, and he waited breathless for the experiment, facing the unpredictable compound that would form mysteriously from the elements of their lips. Then he saw--she communicated her excitement to him, lavishly, deeply, with kisses that were not a promise but a fulfillment. They aroused in him not hunger demanding renewal but surfeit that would demand more surfeit . . . kisses that were like charity, creating want by holding back nothing at all.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Winter Dreams
“Nor, when he had seen that it was no use, that he did not possess in himself the power to move fundamentally or to hold Judy Jones, did he bear any malice toward her. He loved her, and he would love her until the day he was too old for loving--but he could not have her. So he tasted the deep pain that is reserved only for the strong, just as he had tasted for a little while the deep happiness.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Winter Dreams
“I live in a house over there on the Island, and in that house there is a man waiting for me. When he drove up at the door I drove out of the dock because he says I’m his ideal.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Winter Dreams
“Even the grief he could have borne was left behind in the country of illusion, of youth, of the richness of life, where his winter dreams had flourished.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Winter Dreams
“The dream was gone. Something had been taken from him. In a sort of panic he pushed the palms of his hands into his eyes and tried to bring up a picture of the waters lapping on Sherry Island and the moonlit veranda, and gingham on the golf-links and the dry sun and the gold color of her neck's soft down. And her mouth damp to his kisses and her eyes plaintive with melancholy and her freshness like new fine linen in the morning. Why, these things were no longer in the world! They had existed and they existed no longer.

For the first time in years the tears were streaming down his face. But they were for himself now. He did not care about mouth and eyes and moving hands. He wanted to care, and he could not care. For he had gone away and he could never go back any more. The gates were closed, the sun was gone down, and there was no beauty but the gray beauty of steel that withstands all time. Even the grief he could have borne was left behind in the country of illusion, of youth, of the richness of life, where his winter dreams had flourished.

“Long ago,” he said, “long ago, there was something in me, but now that thing is gone. Now that thing is gone, that thing is gone. I cannot cry. I cannot care. That thing will come back no more.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Winter Dreams
“My God, she's good-looking!" said Mr. Sandwood, who was just over thirty.

"Good-looking!" cried Mr. Hedrick contemptuously, "she always looks as if she wanted to be kissed! Turning those big cow-eyes on every calf in town!"

It was doubtful if Mr. Hedrick intended a reference to the maternal instinct.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Winter Dreams
tags: humor
“I’m more beautiful than anybody else,” she said brokenly, “why can’t I be happy?”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Winter Dreams
“He loved her, and he would love her until the day he was too old for loving–but he could not have her. So he tasted the deep pain that is reserved only for the strong, just as he had tasted for a little while the deep happiness.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Winter Dreams
“The dream was gone. Something had been taken from him.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Winter Dreams
“She was entertained only by the gratification of her desires and by the direct exercise of her own charm.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Winter Dreams

All Quotes
Quotes By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game