The Dead Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
The Dead The Dead by James Joyce
8,395 ratings, 4.13 average rating, 275 reviews
Open Preview
The Dead Quotes (showing 1-18 of 18)
“Why is it that words like these seem dull and cold? Is it because there is no word tender enough to be your name?”
James Joyce, The Dead
tags: love
“Moments of their secret life together burst like stars upon his memory.”
James Joyce, The Dead
“Under cover of her silence he pressed her arm closely to his side; and, as they stood at the hotel door, he felt that they had escaped from their lives and duties, escaped from home and friends and run away together with wild and radiant hearts to a new adventure.”
James Joyce, The Dead
“Like the tender fires of stars moments of their life together, that no one knew of or would ever know of, broke upon and illuminated his memory.”
James Joyce, The Dead
“For the years, he felt, had not quenched his soul, or hers.”
James Joyce, The Dead
“His soul swooned softly as he heard the snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead.”
James Joyce, The Dead
“In one letter that he had written to her then he had said: Why is it that words like these seem to me so dull and cold? Is it because there is no word tender enough to be your name?”
James Joyce, The Dead
“He asked himself what is a woman standing on the stairs in the shadow, listening to distant music, a symbol of. If he were a painter he would paint her in that attitude. Her blue felt hat would show off the bronze of her hair against the darkness and the dark panels of her skirt would show off the light ones. Distant Music he would call the picture if he were a painter.”
James Joyce, The Dead
“Better pass boldly into that other world, in the full glory of some passion, than fade and wither dismally with age.”
James Joyce, The Dead
“I feel more strongly with every recurring year that our country has no tradition which does it so much honour and which it should guard so jealously as that of its hospitality. It is a tradition that is unique as far as my experience goes (and I have visited not a few places abroad) among the modern nations. Some would say, perhaps, that with us it is rather a failing than anything to be boasted of. But granted even that, it is, to my mind, a princely failing, and one that I trust will long be cultivated among us. Of one thing, at least, I am sure. As long as this one roof shelters the good ladies aforesaid- and I wish from my heart it may do so for many and many a long year to come- the tradition of genuine warm-hearted courteous Irish hospitality, which our forefathers have handed down to us and which we must hand down to our descendants, is still alive among us.”
James Joyce, The Dead
“Like the tender fire of stars moments of their life together, that no one knew of or would ever know of, broke upon and illumined his memory. He longed to recall to her those moments, to make her forget the years of their dull existence together and remember only their moments of ecstasy.”
James Joyce, The Dead
“Our path through life is strewn with many such sad memories: and were we to brood upon them always we could not find the heart to go on bravely with our work among the living...therefore, I will not linger on the past. I will not let any gloomy moralising intrude...”
James Joyce, The Dead
“He longed to be master of her strange mood.”
James Joyce, The Dead
“He could have flung his arms about her hips and held her still, for his arms were trembling with desire to seize her and only the stress of his nails against the palms of his hands held the wild impulse of his body in check.”
James Joyce, The Dead
“A new generation is growing up in our midst, a generation actuated by new ideas and new principles. It is serious and enthusiastic for these new ideas and its enthusiasm, even when it is misdirected, is, I believe, in the main sincere. But we are living in a sceptical and, if I may use the phrase, a thought-tormented age: and sometimes I fear that this new generation, educated or hypereducated as it is, will lack those qualities of humanity, of hospitality, of kindly humour which belonged to an older day.”
James Joyce, The Dead
“He had felt proud and happy then, happy that she was his, proud of her grace and wifely carriage.”
James Joyce, The Dead
“She seemed to him so frail that he longed to defend her against something and then to be alone with her. Moments of their secret life together burst like stars upon his memory.”
James Joyce, The Dead
“He had felt proud and happy then, happy that she was his, proud of her grace and wifely carriage. But now, after the kindling again of so many memories, the first touch of her body, musical and strange and perfumed, sent through him a keen pang of lust…he felt that they had escaped from their lives and duties, escaped from home and friends and run away together with wild and radiant hearts to a new adventure.”
James Joyce, The Dead

All Quotes
Quotes By James Joyce
Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game