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Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel H. Pink
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Drive Quotes (showing 1-21 of 21)
“The ultimate freedom for creative groups is the freedom to experiment with new ideas. Some skeptics insist that innovation is expensive. In the long run, innovation is cheap. Mediocrity is expensive—and autonomy can be the antidote.”   TOM KELLEY General Manager, IDEO”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“Greatness and nearsightedness are incompatible. Meaningful achievement depends on lifting one's sights and pushing toward the horizon.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“Newtonian physics runs into problems at the subatomic level. Down there--in the land of hadrons, quarks, and Schrödinger's cat--things gent freaky. The cool rationality of Isaac Newton gives way to the bizarre unpredictability of Lewis Carroll.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“The problem with making an extrinsic reward the only destination that matters is that some people will choose the quickest route there, even if it means taking the low road. Indeed, most of the scandals and misbehavior that have seemed endemic to modern life involve shortcuts.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“The monkeys solved the puzzle simply because they found it gratifying to solve puzzles. They enjoyed it. The joy of the task was its own reward.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“People can have two different mindsets, she says. Those with a “fixed mindset” believe that their talents and abilities are carved in stone. Those with a “growth mindset” believe that their talents and abilities can be developed. Fixed mindsets see every encounter as a test of their worthiness. Growth mindsets see the same encounters as opportunities to improve.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“Human beings have an innate inner drive to be autonomous, self-determined, and connected to one another. And when that drive is liberated, people achieve more and live richer lives.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“Dan Ariely, author of Predictably Irrational, a book that offers an entertaining and engaging overview of behavioral economics.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“Lawyers often face intense demands but have relatively little “decision latitude.” Behavioral scientists use this term to describe the choices, and perceived choices, a person has. In a sense, it’s another way of describing autonomy—and lawyers are glum and cranky because they don’t have much of it.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“As Carol Dweck says, “Effort is one of the things that gives meaning to life. Effort means you care about something, that something is important to you and you are willing to work for it. It would be an impoverished existence if you were not willing to value things and commit yourself to working toward them.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“Goals may cause systematic problems for organizations due to narrowed focus, unethical behavior, increased risk taking, decreased cooperation, and decreased intrinsic motivation. Use care when applying goals in your organization.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“In the past, work was defined primarily by putting in time, and secondarily on getting results. We need to flip that model,” Ressler told me. “No matter what kind of business you’re in, it’s time to throw away the tardy slips, time clocks, and outdated industrial-age thinking.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“Lead with questions, not answers.” “Engage in dialogue and debate, not coercion.” “Conduct autopsies, without blame.” “Build ‘red flag’ mechanisms.” In other words, make it easy for employees and customers to speak up when they identify a problem.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“We leave lucrative jobs to take low-paying ones that provide a clearer sense of purpose.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“Goals that people set for themselves and that are devoted to attaining mastery are usually healthy. But goals imposed by others--sales targets, quarterly returns, standardized test scores, and so on--can sometimes have dangerous side effects.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“When the reward is the activity itself--deepening learning, delighting customers, doing one's best--there are no shortcuts.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“They're working hard and persisting through difficulties because of their internal desire to control their lives, learn about their world, and accomplish something that endures.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“Living a satisfying life requires more than simply meeting the demands of those in control. Yet in our offices and our classrooms we have way too much compliance and way too little engagement. The former might get you through the day, but the latter will get you through the night.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“The course of human history has always moved in the direction of greater freedom. And there’s a reason for that—because it’s in our nature to push for it,” Ryan told me. “If we were just plastic like [some] people think, this wouldn’t be happening. But somebody stands in front of a tank in China. Women, who’ve been denied autonomy, keep advocating for rights. This is the course of history. This is why ultimately human nature, if it ever realizes itself, will do so by becoming more autonomous.”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
“Several researchers have found that companies that spend the most time offering guidance on quarterly earnings deliver significantly lower long-term growth rates than companies that offer guidance less frequently. (One reason: The earnings-obsessed companies typically invest less in research and development.)”
Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

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