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The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality by Joan Frances Casey
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The Flock Quotes (showing 1-17 of 17)
“I get attached to people, but they have their own lives, their own problems, and really don't give a shit about anyone else. I knew that was true, and it didn't bother me most of the time. I had learned to be a friend without expecting anything in return. I had learned not to be surprised when people decided that I no longer fit into their lives. (14)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“I feel as though I can only hold it together if I don't worry too much about its falling apart. (288)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“I knew Lynn was a "professional." Like all of the therapists I had seen before her, she was talking to me because she was getting paid to do so. But she was better at pretending that she cared. Her body language and sympathetic "umm' suggested that she really listened. (12)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“I don't expect to have a fully verified story of how Jo's disorder developed, but I don't think that historical accuracy is as important as what I call "emotional truth." People attach different levels of significance to the same events. No two participants in any event remember it in exactly the same way. A single broken promise, for example, among thousands of promises kept, might not be remembered by a parent, but may never be forgotten by the child who was disappointed. (34)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“When I'm sailing, sometimes I'll spend hours watching flocks of birds. They have something special going on there," Gordon continued. "They are all separate entities, those birds, but they share a single thought. Watch them fly in formation and suddenly veer around some invisible obstacle. Watch them flutter in swirling confusion and then, abruptly, move together in perfect formation again, each knowing its part in the whole. That what I mean by group minds." Gordon seemed to weigh his remarks, as though each word had significance. "A flock," she said, testing the term. "I guess my group of personalities is like a flock." She smiled ruefully. I only wish I could be lead bird sometime. (155)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“I know that you do love me," Jo told Lynn, "and that makes it possible for me to grow, just as love makes it possible for an infant to grow. But you know that I don't like my dependency on you. I'm willing to accept it for a time, because I believe you when you tell me that my acceptance of dependency on you heals a very old need. But I really hate it. I hate being an emotional infant. I want to grow free of you. "If I didn't feel that your love accelerated my growth," Jo added firmly, "I'd fight against it." (165)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“Somehow the disorder hooks into all kinds of fears and insecurities in many clinicians. The flamboyance of the multiple, her intelligence and ability to conceptualize the disorder, coupled with suicidal impulses of various orders of seriousness, all seem to mask for many therapists the underlying pain, dependency, and need that are very much part of the process. In many ways, a professional dealing with a multiple in crisis is in the same position as a parent dealing with a two-year-old or with an adolescent's acting-out behavior. (236)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“I'm going through hell," I cried, "and Steve wants me to be thankful he baked a pie." (272)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“To me, the essential task of any therapy is the same as that of lie - to recognize, experience, and affirm our common humanity as we integrate within, with one another, and with the universe. (viii)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“Even the most damaged and disenchanted teenager was only waiting for someone to see the real persona beneath the defense and respond with genuine caring. (63)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“I thought carefully about the events of the evening and decided that there must be limitations on desires. It wasn't true that I could have anything I wanted. I felt good about understanding that, but I still didn't know how people figured out what it was safe to want. I did know, from my mother's scolding, that 'wanting' was a problem. If the desire could not be filled, then I was greedy and selfish. Since I couldn't figure out how to judge the possibility of fulfilling a desire. (66).”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“The accuracy of my memories, whether things happened exactly the way that the personalities remember, doesn't really matter. If my memory, combined with the memories of the other personalities, provides some coherent past, then that is far better than the blankness I have. Whatever inaccuracies may occur because of the passage of time or because of the colored intensity of "emotional truth" harm no one. All that matters is that I gain a firm grasp on what is real. (165)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“Lynn said that therapy was like separating the strands in a tangled web of yarn. It made sense that things would keep getting more separate for awhile so that we eventually came back together in an organized way. (205)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“It is the story of people who found each other at the right moment in their lives and performed magic. (v)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“She knew she needed Lynn, so she wouldn't get angry at her. Jo's parents had taught her long ago that it was not safe to get angry at someone she depended on. (53)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“No person could fill twenty-six years of lack. And each personality had learned from experience that is was less painful to set limits than to have some external person set limits for us. (95)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality
“I have come to believe that concentrated time, when it's needed - freely given and with a special purpose - can accomplish goals that even years of traditional treatment sometimes cannot. (185)”
Joan Frances Casey, The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality

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