Chaos Quotes

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Chaos: Making a New Science Chaos: Making a New Science by James Gleick
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Chaos Quotes (showing 1-30 of 30)
“Ideas that require people to reorganize their picture of the world provoke hostility.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“سارت الشمس في سماء لم تر الغيوم البتة. وكنست الريح أرضا ملساء كالزجاج. لم يأت الليل البتة، ولا فسح الخريف الطريق أمام الشتاء”
جايمس غليك, Chaos: Making a New Science
“You don’t see something until you have the right metaphor to let you perceive it”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“mandelbrot changed the way ibm's engineers thought about the cause of noise. bursts of errors had always sent the engineers looking for a man sticking a screwdriver somewhere.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“Nature forms patterns. Some are orderly in space but disorderly in time, others orderly in time but disorderly in space. Some patterns are fractal, exhibiting structures self-similar in scale. Others give rise to steady states or oscillating ones. Pattern formation has become a branch of physics and of materials science, allowing scientists to model the aggregation of particles into clusters, the fractured spread of electrical discharges, and the growth of crystals in ice and metal alloys. The dynamics seem so basic—shapes changing in space and time—yet only now are the tools available to understand them.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“The boundary is where points are slowest to escape the pull of the set. It is as if they are balanced between competing attractors, one at zero and the other, in effect, ringing the set at a distance of infinity.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“it struck me as an operational way to define free will, in a way that allowed you to reconcile free will with determinism. The system is deterministic, but you can’t say what it’s going to do next.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“Billions of years ago there were just blobs of protoplasm; now billions of years later here we are. So information has been created and stored in our structure. In the development of one person’s mind from childhood, information is clearly not just accumulated but also generated—created from connections that were not there before”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“He worked for two months without pause. His functional day was twenty-two hours. He would try to go to sleep in a kind of buzz, and awaken two hours later with his thoughts exactly where he had left them. His diet was strictly coffee. (Even when healthy and at peace, Feigenbaum subsisted exclusively on the reddest possible meat, coffee, and red wine. His friends speculated that he must be getting his vitamins from cigarettes.) In the end, a doctor called it off. He prescribed a modest regimen of Valium and an enforced vacation. But by then Feigenbaum had created a universal theory.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“Of all the possible pathways of disorder, nature favors just a few.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“Shallow ideas can be assimilated; ideas that require people to reorganize their picture of the world provoke hostility.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“I know that most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it be such as would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“quoting Tolstoy: “I know that most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it be such as would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“The spot is a self-organizing system, created and regulated by the same nonlinear twists that create the unpredictable turmoil around it. It is stable chaos.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“don’t see something until you have the right metaphor to let you perceive it,”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“Given an approximate knowledge of a system’s initial conditions and an understanding of natural law, one can calculate the approximate behavior of the system.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“Chaos is a creator of information—another apparent paradox.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“Even when a damped, driven system is at equilibrium, it is not at equilibrium,”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“Winfree came from a family in which no one had gone to college. He got started, he would say, by not having proper education. His father, rising from the bottom of the life insurance business to the level of vice president, moved family almost yearly up and down the East Coast, and Winfree attended than a dozen schools before finishing high school. He developed a feeling that the interesting things in the world had to do with biology and mathematics and a companion feeling that no standard combination of the two subjects did justice to what was interesting. So he decided not to take a standard approach. He took a five-year course in engineering physics at Cornell University, learning applied mathematics and a full range of hands-on laboratory styles. Prepared to be hired into military-industrial complex, he got a doctorate in biology, striving to combine experiment with theory in new ways.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“Lorenz saw it differently. Yes, you could change the weather. You could make it do something different from what it would otherwise have done. But if you did, then you would never know what it would otherwise have done. It would be like giving an extra shuffle to an already well-shuffled pack of cards. You know it will change your luck, but you don’t know whether for better or worse.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“IN THE MIND’S EYE, a fractal is a way of seeing infinity.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“One simple but powerful consequence of the fractal geometry of surfaces is that surfaces in contact do not touch everywhere. The bumpiness at all scales prevents that. Even in rock under enormous pressure, at some sufficiently small scale it becomes clear that gaps remain, allowing fluid to flow.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“Self-similarity is symmetry across scale. It implies recursion, pattern inside of pattern.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“The fractal structure nature has devised works so efficiently that, in most tissue, no cell is ever more than three or four cells away from a blood vessel. Yet the vessels and blood take up little space, no more than about five percent of the body.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“The early sense of self-similarity as an organizing principle came from the limitations on the human experience of scale.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“Simple shapes are inhuman. They fail to resonate with the way nature organizes itself or with the way human perception sees the world.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“Physicists like to think that all you have to do is say, these are the conditions, now what happens next? —RICHARD P. FEYNMAN”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“the pattern appears so ethereally, that it is hard to remember that the shape is an attractor. It is not just any trajectory of a dynamical system. It is the trajectory toward which all other trajectories converge.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“the brain does not own any direct copies of stuff in the world. There is no library of forms and ideas against which to compare the images of perception. Information is stored in a plastic way, allowing fantastic juxtapositions and leaps of imagination. Some chaos exists out there, and the brain seems to have more flexibility than classical physics in finding the order in it.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science
“The only things that can ever be universal, in a sense, are scaling things.”
James Gleick, Chaos: Making a New Science

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