The History of Sexuality 1 Quotes

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The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction by Michel Foucault
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The History of Sexuality 1 Quotes (showing 1-14 of 14)
“Where there is power, there is resistance.”
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction
“The appearance in nineteenth-century psychiatry, jurisprudence, and literature of a whole series of discourses on the species and subspecies of homosexuality, inversion, pederasty, and "psychic hermaphroditism" made possible a strong advance of social controls into this area of "perversity"; but it also made possible the formation of a "reverse" discourse: homosexuality began to speak in its own behalf, to demand that its legitimacy or "naturality" be acknowledged, often in the same vocabulary, using the same categories by which it was medically disqualified.”
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction
“We demand that sex speak the truth [...] and we demand that it tell us our truth, or rather, the deeply buried truth of that truth about ourselves wich we think we possess in our immediate consciousness.”
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction
“In actual fact. The manifold sexualities - those which appear with the different ages (sexualities of the infant or the child), those which become fixated on particular tastes or practices (the sexuality of the invert, the gerontophile, the fetishist), those which, in a diffuse manner, invest relationships (the sexuality of doctor and patient, teacher and student, psychiatrist and mental patient), those which haunt spaces (the sexuality of the home, the school, the prison)- all form the correlate of exact procedures of power.”
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction
“There is not one but many silences, and they are an integral part of the strategies that underlie and permeate discourses.”
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction
“Resistances do not derive from a few heterogeneous principles; but neither are they a lure or a promise that is of necessity betrayed. They are the odd term in relations of power; they are inscribed in the latter as an irreducible opposite.”
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction
“power is tolerable only on condition that it masks a substantial part of itself. Its success is proportional to an ability to hide its own mechanisms.”
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction
“It is not the activity of the subject of knowledge that produces a corpus of knowledge, useful or resistant to power, but power-knowledge, the processes and struggles that transverse it and of which it is made up, that determines the forms and possible domains of knowledge.”
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction
“[T]hus one should not think that desire is repressed, for the simple reason that the law is what constitutes both desire and the lack on which it is predicated. Where there is desire, the power relation is already present: an illusion, then, to denounce this relation for a repression exerted after the event.”
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction
“there is no escaping from power, that it is always-already present constituting that very thing which one attempts to counter it with.”
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction
“No seventeenth-century pedagogue would have publicly advised his disciple, as did Erasmus in his Dialogues, on the choice of a good prostitute.”
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction
“People will be surprised at the eagerness with which we went about
pretending to rouse from its slumber a sexuality which every­thing-our discourses, our customs, our institutions, our regulations, our knowledges-was busy producing in the light of day and broadcasting to noisy accompaniment.”
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction
“la conveniencia de las actitudes esquiva los cuerpos, la decencia de las palabras blanquea los discursos”
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction
“The question I would like to pose is not, Why are we repressed? but rather, Why do we say, with so much passion and so much resentment... that we are repressed? By what spiral did we come to affirm that sex is negated? What led us to show, ostentatiously, that sex is something we hide, to say it is something we silence?

...I do not maintain that prohibition of sex is a ruse; but it is a ruse to make prohibition into the basic and constitutive element from which one would be able to write the history of what has been said concerning sex starting from the modern epoch.”
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction

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