Nicholas Nickleby Quotes

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Nicholas Nickleby Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
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Nicholas Nickleby Quotes (showing 1-30 of 58)
“The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“Happiness is a gift and the trick is not to expect it, but to delight in it when it comes.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“When I speak of home, I speak of the place where in default of a better--those I love are gathered together; and if that place where a gypsy's tent, or a barn, I should call it by the same good name notwithstanding.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“Dreams are the bright creatures of poem and legend, who sport on earth in the night season, and melt away in the first beam of the sun, which lights grim care and stern reality on their daily pilgrimage through the world.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“Most men unconsciously judge the world from themselves, and it will be very generally found that those who sneer habitually at human nature, and affect to despise it, are among its worst and least pleasant samples.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“Gold conjures up a mist about a man, more destructive of all his old senses and lulling to his feelings than the fumes of charcoal.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“Pride is one of the seven deadly sins; but it cannot be the pride of a mother in her children, for that is a compound of two cardinal virtues — faith and hope.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“Mystery and disappointment are not absolutely indispensable to the growth of love, but they are, very often, its powerful auxiliaries.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
tags: love
“It was a harder day's journey than yesterday's, for there were long and weary hills to climb; and in journeys, as in life, it is a great deal easier to go down hill than up. However, they kept on, with unabated perseverance, and the hill has not yet lifted its face to heaven that perseverance will not gain the summit of at last.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“What do you mean, Phib?" asked Miss Squeers, looking in her own little glass, where, like most of us, she saw - not herself, but the reflection of some pleasant image in her own brain.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“Thus two people who cannot afford to play cards for money, sometimes sit down to a quiet game for love.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“Subdue your appetites, my dears, and you've conquered human natur.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“You cannot stain a black coat”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“...and memory, however sad, is the best and purest link between this world and a better. But come! I'll tell you a story of another kind.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“In journeys, as in life, it is a great deal easier to go down hill than up”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“There are many pleasant fictions of the law in constant operation, but there is not one so pleasant or practically humorous as that which supposes every man to be of equal value in its impartial eye, and the benefits of all laws to be equally attainable by all men, without the smallest reference to the furniture of their pockets.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“A horse is a quadruped, and quadruped's latin for beast, as everybody that's gone through grammar knows, or else what's the use in having grammars at all?”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“He had but one eye, and the popular prejudice favour runs in favour of two.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“...let it be remembered that most men live in a world of their own, and that in that limited circle alone are they ambitious for distinction and applause. Sir Mulberry's world was peopled with profligates, and he acted accordingly.

Thus, cases of injustice, and oppression, and tyranny, and the most extravagant bigotry, are in constant occurrence among us every day. It is the custom to trumpet forth much wonder and astonishment at the chief actors therein setting at defiance so completely the opinion of the world. But there is no greater fallacy; it is precisely because they do consult the opinion of their own little world that such things take place at all, and strike the great world dumb with amazement.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“se there was a matter of half a ream of brown paper stuck upon me, from first to last. As I laid all of a heap in our kitchen, plastered all over, you might have thought I was a large brown-paper parcel, chock full of nothing but groans. Did I groan loud, Wackford, or did I groan soft?' asked Mr Squeers, appealing to his son.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“the United Metropolitan Improved Hot Muffin and Crumpet Baking and Punctual Delivery Company.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“Such is the sleight of hand by which we juggle with ourselves, and change our very weaknesses into stanch and most magnanimous virtues!”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“What a situation!' cried Miss Squeers; '...What is the reason that men fall in love with me, whether I like it or not, and desert their chosen intendeds for my sake?'
'Because they can't help it, miss,' replied the girl; 'the reason's plain.' (If Miss Squeers were the reason, it was very plain.)”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“My conduct, Pugstyles,' said Mr Gregsbury, looking round upon the deputation with gracious magnanimity—'my conduct has been, and ever will be, regulated by a sincere regard for the true and real interests of this great and happy country. Whether I look at home, or abroad; whether I behold the peaceful industrious communities of our island home: her rivers covered with steamboats, her roads with locomotives, her streets with cabs, her skies with balloons of a power and magnitude hitherto unknown in the history of aeronautics in this or any other nation—I say, whether I look merely at home, or, stretching my eyes farther, contemplate the boundless prospect of conquest and possession—achieved by British perseverance and British valour—which is outspread before me, I clasp my hands, and turning my eyes to the broad expanse above my head, exclaim, "Thank Heaven, I am a Briton!”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“...The bottom of his garden joins the bottom of ours, and of course I had several times seen him, sitting among the scarlet-beans in his little arbour, or working at his little hotbeds. I used to think he stared rather, but I didn't take any particular notice of that, as we were newcomers, and he might be curious to see what we were like. But when he began to throw his cucumbers over our wall--"
"To throw his cucumbers over our wall!" repeated Nicholas in great astonishment.
"Yes, Nicholas, my dear," replied Mrs. Nickleby, in a very serious tone; "his cucumbers over our wall. And vegetable-marrows likewise."
"Confound his impudence!" said Nicholas, firing immediately. "What does he mean by that?"
"I don't think he means it impertinently at all," replied Mrs. Nickleby.
"What!" said Nicholas, "cucumbers and vegetable-marrows flying at the heads of the family as they walk in their own garden and not meant impertinently!”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
tags: humor
“If any preposterous bill were brought forward, for giving poor grubbing devils of authors a right to their own property I should like to say, that I for one would never consent to opposing an insurmountable bar to the diffusion of literature among the people...”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“And Ralph always wound up these mental soliloquies by arriving at the conclusion, that there was nothing like money.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“But, there is one broad sky over all the world, and whether it be blue or cloudy, the same heaven beyond”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“He executed his commission with great promptitude and dispatch, only calling at one public-house for half a minute, and even that might be said to be in his way, for he went in at one door and came out at the other[.]”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
“Others collected round the coach, and gave vent to various surmises; some held that she had fallen asleep; some, that she had burnt herself to death; some, that she had got drunk; and one very fat man that she had seen something to eat which had frightened her so much (not being used to it) that she had fallen into a fit.”
Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

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