Bluebeard's Egg Quotes

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Bluebeard's Egg Bluebeard's Egg by Margaret Atwood
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Bluebeard's Egg Quotes (showing 1-18 of 18)
“In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“People change, though, especially after they are dead.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“In theory I can do almost anything; certainly I have been told how. In practice I do as little as possible. I pretend to myself that I would be quite happy in a hermit's cave, living on gruel, if someone else would make the gruel. Gruel, like so many other things, is beyond me.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“Religious people of any serious kind made her nervous: they were like men in raincoats who might or might not be flashers.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“Walking along past the store windows, into which she peers with her usual eagerness, her usual sense that maybe, today, she will discover behind them something that will truly be worth seeing, she feels as if her feet are not on cement at all but on ice. The blade of the skate floats, she knows, on a thin film of water, which it melts by pressure and which freezes behind it. This is the freedom of the present tense, this sliding edge.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“It must have been then that I began to lose faith in reasonable argument as the sole measure of truth.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
tags: truth
“She finds this objectivity of hers, this clarity, almost more depressing than she can bear, not because there is anything hideous or repellant about this man but because he has now returned to the ordinary level, the level of things she can see, in all their amazing and complex particularity, but cannot touch.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“What thumbsuckers we all are...when it comes to mothers.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“...he was the kind of boy for whom cleverness was female.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“The house, and all the objects in it, crackled with static electricity; undertows washed through it, the air was heavy with things that were known but not spoken. Like a hollow log, a drum, a church, it was amplified, so that conversations whispered in it sixty years ago can be half-heard today.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“He wants to see, he wants to know, only to see and know. I'm aware that it is this mentality, this curiosity, which is responsible for the hydrogen bomb and the imminent demise of civilization and that we would all be better off if we were still at the stone-worshipping stage. Though surely it is not this affable inquisitiveness that should be blamed.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“Have I been conditioned to believe that if I am not solicitous, if I am not forthcoming, if I am not a never-ending cornicopia of entertaining delights, they will take their collections of milk-bottle tops and their mangy one-eared teddy bears and go away into the woods by themselves to play snipers? Probably. What my mother thinks was merely cute may have been lethal.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“call attention of course to the breasts. Some of these women have been within inches of getting Ed to put his head down on their chests, right there in Sally’s living room. Watching all this out of the corners of her eyes while serving the liqueurs, Sally feels the Aztec rise within her. Trouble with your heart? Get it removed, she thinks. Then you’ll have no more problems.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“My mother has few stories to tell about these times. What I remember from them is the odd look I would sometimes catch in her eyes. It struck me, for the first time in my life, that my mother might be afraid of me. I could not even reassure her, because I was only dimly aware of the nature of her distress, but there must have been something going on in me that was beyond her: at any time I might open my mouth and out would come a language she had never heard before. I had become a visitant from outer space, a time-traveller come back from the future, bearing news of a great disaster.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“Have I been conditioned to believe that if I am not solicitous, if I am not forthcoming, if I am not a never-ending cornicopia of entertaining delights, they will take their collections of milk-bottle tops and their mangy one-eared teddy bears and go away into the woods by themselves to play snipers? Probably. What my mother things was merely cute may have been lethal.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“Das Vergessen war absichtlich: Es war dasselbe wie Sich-Erinnern, nur das Gegenteil.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“Ich wußte, daß mich meine Mutter, wenn ich oben angekommen war, fragen würde, was ich zu Mittag essen wollte, was mich schrecklich wütend machen würde. Ich wußte nie, was ich zum Mittagessen wollte, aber wenn ich es wußte, gab es immer etwas ganz anderes. Es wäre mir nie in den Sinn gekommen, daß meine Mutter die Mahlzeiten noch langweiliger fand als ich, denn sie mußte sie ja zubereiten, oder daß sie mich mit ihrer Fragerei vielleicht bloß um Hilfe bat.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg
“Ich fuhr mit den Fingern über Buddys silbernen Namen, als würde ich ihn bewundern. Ich dachte gar nicht daran, es zurückzuweisen; das war unmöglich, denn ich hätte niemals erklären können, was daran falsch war, es anzunehmen. Auch hatte ich das Gefühl, daß Buddy etwas gegen mich in der Hand hatte: daß er jetzt, nachdem er zufällig etwas von mir gesehen hatte, das echt war, zuviel über meine Abweichungen von der Norm wußte. Ich hatte das Gefühl, daß ich es irgendwie zurechtbiegen mußte. Jahre später kam mir der Gedanke, daß wahrscheinlich viele Frauen auf diese Weise eine Verlobung oder sogar eine Ehe eingegangen waren.”
Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard's Egg

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