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Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality by Friedrich Nietzsche
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Daybreak Quotes (showing 1-30 of 65)
“Doubt as sin. — Christianity has done its utmost to close the circle and declared even doubt to be sin. One is supposed to be cast into belief without reason, by a miracle, and from then on to swim in it as in the brightest and least ambiguous of elements: even a glance towards land, even the thought that one perhaps exists for something else as well as swimming, even the slightest impulse of our amphibious nature — is sin! And notice that all this means that the foundation of belief and all reflection on its origin is likewise excluded as sinful. What is wanted are blindness and intoxication and an eternal song over the waves in which reason has drowned.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“We laugh at a man who, stepping out of his room at the very minute when the sun is rising, says, “It is my will that the sun shall rise”; or at him who, unable to stop a wheel, says, “I wish it to roll”; or, again, at him who, thrown in a wrestling match, says, “Here I lie, but here I wish to lie.” But, joking apart, do we not act like one of these three persons whenever we use the expression “I wish”?”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“This woman is beautiful and clever: but how much cleverer she would have become if she were not beautiful!”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“I deny morality as I deny alchemy.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“Moderation sees itself as beautiful; it is unaware that in the eye of the immoderate it appears black and sober and consequently ugly-looking”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“Business people - Your business - is your greatest prejudice: it ties you to your locality, to the company you keep, to the inclinations you feel. Diligent in business - but indolent in spirit, content with your inadequacy, and with the cloak of duty hung over this contentment: that is how you live, that is how you want your children to live!”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“Our evaluations. - All actions may be traced back to evaluations, all evaluations are original or adopted - the latter being by far the most common. Why do we adopt them? From fear - that is to say, we consider it more advisable to pretend they are our own - and accustom ourself to this pretense, so that at length it becomes our own nature. Original evaluation: that is to say, to assess a thing according to the extent to which it pleases or displeases us alone and no one else - something excessively rare! But must our evaluation of another, in which there lies motive for our general availing ourselves of his HIS evaluation, at least not proceed from US, be our OWN determination? Yes, but we arrive at it as children, and rarely learn to change our view; most of us are our whole lives long the fools of the way we acquired in childhood of judging our neighbors (their minds, rank, morality, whether they are exemplary or reprehensible) and of finding it necessary to pay homage to their evaluations.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“Popular medicine and popular morality belong together and ought not to be evaluated so differently as they still are: both are the most dangerous pseudo-sciences.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“Whatever they may think and say about their "egoism", the great majority nonetheless do nothing for their ego their whole life long: what they do is done for the phantom of their ego which has formed itself in the heads of those around them and has been communicated to them.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“He who is punished is never he who performed the deed. He is always the scapegoat.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“The great wars of the present age are the effects of the study of history.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“For those who need consolation no means of consolation is so effective as the assertion that in their case no consolation is possible: it implies so great a degree of distinction that they at once hold up their heads again.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“The Christian church is an encyclopaedia of prehistoric cults and conceptions of the most diverse orgiin and that is why it is so capable of proselytising: it always could and it can still go wherever it pleases and it always found and it always finds something similar to itself to which it can adapt itself and gradually impose upon it a Christian meaning.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“The sum of the inner movements which a man finds easy and as a consequence performs gracefully and with pleasure, one calls his soul; if these inner movements are plainly difficult and an effort for him, he is considered soulless.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“Facta! Yes, Facta ficta! - A historian has to do, not with what actually happened, but only with events supposed to have happened: for only the latter have produced an effect. Likewise only with supposed heroes. His theme, so-called world history, is opinions about supposed actions and their supposed motives, which in turn give rise to further opinions and actions, the reality of which is however at once vaporised again and produces an effect only as vapour - a continual generation and pregnancy of phantoms over the impentetrable mist of unfathomable reality. All historians speak of things which have never existed except in imagination.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
tags: truth
“Whatever may be your desire to accomplish great deeds, the deep silence of pregnancy never comes to you! The event of the day sweeps you along like straws before the wind whilst ye lie under the illusion that ye are chasing the event,—poor fellows! If a man wishes to act the hero on the stage he must not think of forming part of the chorus; he should not even know how the chorus is made up.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, The Dawn of Day
Those who commend work. - In the glorification of 'work', in the unwearied talk of the 'blessing of work', I see the same covert idea as in the praise of useful impersonal actions: that of fear of everything individual. Fundamentally, one now feels at the sight of work - one always means by work that hard industriousness from early till late - that such work is the best policeman, that it keeps everyone in bounds and can mightily hinder the development of reason, covetousness, desire for independence. For it uses up an extraordinary amount of nervous energy, which is thus denied to reflection, brooding, dreaming, worrying, loving, hating; it sets a small goal always in sight and guarantees easy and regular satisfactions. Thus a society in which there is continual hard work will have more security: and security is now worshipped as the supreme divinity. - And now! Horror! Precisely the 'worker' has become dangerous! The place is swarming with 'dangerous individuals'! And behind them the danger of dangers - the individual!”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“Knowing one's 'individuality'. - We are too prone to forget that in the eyes of people who are seeing us for the first time we are something quite different from what we consider ourselves to be: usually we are nothing more than a single individual trait which leaps to the eye and determines the whole impression that we make.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“The great problems are to be encountered in the street.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“Prejudice of the learned. – The learned judge correctly that people of all ages have believed they know what is good and evil, praise- and blameworthy. But it is a prejudice of the learned that we now know better than any other age.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“Only when he has attained a final knowledge of all things will man have come to know himself. For things are only the boundaries of man.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“Works, first and foremost! That is to say, doing, doing, doing! The 'faith' that goes with it will soon put in an appearance - you can be sure of that!”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“It is not true that the unconscious goal in the evolution of every conscious being (animal, man, mankind, etc) is its 'highest happiness': the case, on the contrary, is that every stage of evolution possesses a special and incomparable happiness neither higher nor lower but simply its own. Evolution does not have happiness in view, but evolution and nothing else.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“Our duties - are the rights of others over us.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“The surest way of ruining a youth is to teach him to respect those who think as he does more highly than those who think differently from him.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“The least step forward in the domain of free thought and individual life has been achieved in all ages to the accompaniment of physical and intellectual tortures: and not only the mere step forward, no! but every form of movement and change has rendered necessary innumerable martyrs, throughout the entire course of thousands of years which sought their paths and laid down their foundation-stones, years, however, which we do not think of when we speak about “world-history,” that ridiculously small division of mankind's existence. And even in this so-called world-history, which in the main is merely a great deal of noise about the latest novelties, there is no more important theme than the old, old tragedy of the martyrs who tried to move the mire.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“For nothing is of greater importance than that a powerful, long-established, and irrational custom should be once again confirmed by the act of some one who is recognized as rational. In this way the proceeding is thought to be sanctioned by reason itself! All honor to your opinions! but little unconventional actions are of still greater value.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, The Dawn of Day
“O Filósofo e a Velhice
Não é bom deixar a noite julgar o dia: pois com frequência o cansaço torna-se juiz da força, do êxito e da boa vontade. Assim também é aconselhável extrema cautela em relação à idade e seu julgamento da vida, uma vez que a velhice, como a noite, ama disfarçar-se de uma nova e atraente moralidade e sabe humilhar o dia com os vermelhos do crepúsculo e o silêncio apaziguador ou nostálgico.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“Freedoers are at disadvantage compared with freethinkers because people suffer more obviously from the consequences of deeds than from those of thoughts.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality
“There is today perhaps no more firmly credited prejudice than this: that one knows what really constitutes the moral. Today it seems to do everyone good when they hear that society is on the way to adapting the individual to general requirements, and that the happiness and at the same time the sacrifice of the individual lies in feeling himself to be a useful member and instrument of the whole: (...) What is wanted - whether this is admitted or not - is nothing less than a fundamental remoulding, indeed weakening and abolition of the individual”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality

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