Mindset Quotes

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Mindset: The New Psychology of Success Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol S. Dweck
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Mindset Quotes (showing 1-30 of 72)
“Did I win? Did I lose? Those are the wrong questions. The correct question is: Did I make my best effort?” If so, he says, “You may be outscored but you will never lose.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success
“Becoming is better than being”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success
tags: 1960s
“We like to think of our champions and idols as superheroes who were born different from us. We don’t like to think of them as relatively ordinary people who made themselves extraordinary.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success
“So what should we say when children complete a task—say, math problems—quickly and perfectly? Should we deny them the praise they have earned? Yes. When this happens, I say, “Whoops. I guess that was too easy. I apologize for wasting your time. Let’s do something you can really learn from!”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success
“no matter what your ability is, effort is what ignites that ability and turns it into accomplishment.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success
“...when people already know they're deficient, they have nothing to lose by trying.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success
“After seven experiments with hundreds of children, we had some of the clearest findings I’ve ever seen: Praising children’s intelligence harms their motivation and it harms their performance. How can that be? Don’t children love to be praised? Yes, children love praise. And they especially love to be praised for their intelligence and talent. It really does give them a boost, a special glow—but only for the moment. The minute they hit a snag, their confidence goes out the window and their motivation hits rock bottom. If success means they’re smart, then failure means they’re dumb. That’s the fixed mindset.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success
“Picture your brain forming new connections as you meet the challenge and learn. Keep on going.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success
“I believe ability can get you to the top,” says coach John Wooden, “but it takes character to keep you there.… It’s so easy to … begin thinking you can just ‘turn it on’ automatically, without proper preparation. It takes real character to keep working as hard or even harder once you’re there. When you read about an athlete or team that wins over and over and over, remind yourself, ‘More than ability, they have character.' ”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success
“I don’t mind losing as long as I see improvement or I feel I’ve done as well as I possibly could.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success
“Why waste time proving over and over how great you are, when you could be getting better? Why hide deficiencies instead of overcoming them? Why look for friends or partners who will just shore up your self-esteem instead of ones who will also challenge you to grow? And why seek out the tried and true, instead of experiences that will stretch you? The passion for stretching yourself and sticking to it, even (or especially) when it’s not going well, is the hallmark of the growth mindset. This is the mindset that allows people to thrive during some of the most challenging times in their lives.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success
“IF, like those with the growth mindset, you believe you can develop yourself, then you're open to accurate information about your current abilities, even it it's unflattering. What's more, if you're oriented toward learning, as they are, you need accurate information about your current abilities in order to learn effectively”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success
“Parents think they can hand children permanent confidence—like a gift—by praising their brains and talent. It doesn’t work, and in fact has the opposite effect. It makes children doubt themselves as soon as anything is hard or anything goes wrong. If parents want to give their children a gift, the best thing they can do is to teach their children to love challenges, be intrigued by mistakes, enjoy effort, and keep on learning. That way, their children don’t have to be slaves of praise. They will have a lifelong way to build and repair their own confidence.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential
“What on earth would make someone a nonlearner? Everyone is born with an intense drive to learn. Infants stretch their skills daily. Not just ordinary skills, but the most difficult tasks of a lifetime, like learning to walk and talk. They never decide it’s too hard or not worth the effort. Babies don’t worry about making mistakes or humiliating themselves. They walk, they fall, they get”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success
“What on earth would make someone a nonlearner? Everyone is born with an intense drive to learn. Infants stretch their skills daily. Not just ordinary skills, but the most difficult tasks of a lifetime, like learning to walk and talk. They never decide it’s too hard or not worth the effort. Babies don’t worry about making mistakes or humiliating themselves. They walk, they fall, they get up. They just barge forward. What could put an end to this exuberant learning? The fixed mindset. As soon as children become able to evaluate themselves, some of them become afraid of challenges. They become afraid of not being smart. I have studied thousands of people from preschoolers on, and it’s breathtaking how many reject an opportunity to learn.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success
“Mindset change is not about picking up a few pointers here and there. It's about seeing things in a new way. When people...change to a growth mindset, they change from a judge-and-be-judged framework to a learn-and-help-learn framework. Their commitment is to growth, and growth take plenty of time, effort, and mutual support.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success
“Genius is not enough; we need to get the job done.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential
“effort is what ignites that ability and turns it into accomplishment.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success
“True self-confidence is “the courage to be open—to welcome change and new ideas regardless of their source.” Real self-confidence is not reflected in a title, an expensive suit, a fancy car, or a series of acquisitions. It is reflected in your mindset: your readiness to grow.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success
“In fact, every word and action can send a message. It tells children—or students, or athletes—how to think about themselves. It can be a fixed-mindset message that says: You have permanent traits and I’m judging them. Or it can be a growth-mindset message that says: You are a developing person and I am interested in your development.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success
“The passion for stretching yourself and sticking to it, even (or especially) when it’s not going well, is the hallmark of the growth mindset. This is the mindset that allows people to thrive during some of the most challenging times in their lives.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success
“People may start with different temperaments and different aptitudes, but it is clear that experience, training, and personal effort take them the rest of the way.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success
“John Wooden, the legendary basketball coach, says you aren’t a failure until you start to blame. What he means is that you can still be in the process of learning from your mistakes until you deny them.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success
“Think about your hero. Do you think of this person as someone with extraordinary abilities who achieved with little effort? Now go find out the truth. Find out the tremendous effort that went into their accomplishment—and admire them more.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success
“Praise should deal, not with the child’s personality attributes, but with his efforts and achievements.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success
“Believing that your qualities are carved in stone—the fixed mindset—creates an urgency to prove yourself over and over.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential
“Research shows that normal young children misbehave every three minutes.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential
“Don’t judge. Teach. It’s a learning process.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success
“In one world, failure is about having a setback. Getting a bad grade. Losing a tournament. Getting fired. Getting rejected. It means you’re not smart or talented. In the other world, failure is about not growing. Not reaching for the things you value. It means you’re not fulfilling your potential. In one world, effort is a bad thing. It, like failure, means you’re not smart or talented. If you were, you wouldn’t need effort. In the other world, effort is what makes you smart or talented.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential
“As growth-minded leaders, they start with a belief in human potential and development—both their own and other people’s. Instead of using the company as a vehicle for their greatness, they use it as an engine of growth—for themselves, the employees, and the company as a whole.”
Carol S. Dweck, Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential

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