Emma Quotes

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Emma Emma by Jane Austen
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Emma Quotes (showing 61-90 of 216)
“A very narrow income has a tendency to contract the mind, and sour the temper. Those who can barely live, and who live perforce in a very small, and generally very inferior, society, may well be illiberal and cross.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“...faultless in spite of all her faults...”
Jane Austen, Emma
“A single woman, of good fortune, is always respectable, and may be as sensible and pleasant as any body else.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“Where the wound had been given, there must the cure be found, if any where.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“A man always imagines a woman to be ready for anybody who asks her.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“Trusting that you will some time or other do me greater justice than you can do now.”
Jane Austen, Emma
tags: trust
“Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“Miss Bates…had never boasted either beauty or cleverness. Her youth had passed without distinction, and her middle of life was devoted to the care of a failing mother, and the endeavour to make a small income go as far as possible. And yet she was a happy woman, and a woman whom no one named without good-will. It was her own universal goodwill and contented temper which worked such wonders. She loved every body, was interested in every body’s happiness and quick-sighted to every body’s merits; thought herself a most fortunate creature, and surrounded with blessings in such an excellent mother and so many good neighbours and friends, and a home that wanted for nothing. The simplicity and cheerfulness of her nature, her contented and grateful spirit, were a recommendation to every body and a mine of felicity to herself.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“Mr. Knightley seemed to be trying not to smile; and succeeded without difficulty, upon Mrs. Elton's beginning to talk to him.”
Jane Austen, Emma
tags: humor
“How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation!”
Jane Austen, Emma
“His feelings are warm, but I can imagine them rather changeable.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“She looked back as well as she could; but it was all confusion. She had taken up the idea, she supposed and made everything bend to it.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“There is no charm equal to tenderness of heart,' said she afterwards to herself.  'There is nothing to be compared to it.  Warmth and tenderness of heart, with an affectionate, open manner, will beat all the clearness of head in the world, for attraction: I am sure it will.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“General benevolence, but not general friendship, make a man what he ought to be.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“Blessed with so many resources within myself the world was not necessary to me. I could do very well without it.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more. But you know what I am.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“Where the waters do agree, it is quite wonderful the relief they give.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“There was no being displeased with such an encourager, for his admiration made him discern a likeness before it was possible.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“A woman is not to marry a man merely because she is asked, or because he is attached to her, and can write a tolerable letter.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“I do not know whether it ought to be so, but certainly silly things do cease to be silly if they are done by sensible people in an impudent way.  Wickedness is always wickedness, but folly is not always folly.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“I do not find myself making any use of the word sacrifice.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“You speak as if you envied him."
"And I do envy him, Emma. In one respect he is the object of my envy."
Emma could say no more. They seemed to be within half a sentence of Harriet, and her immediate feeling was to avert the subject, if possible. She made her plan; she would speak of something totally different—the children in Brunswick Square; and she only waited for breath to begin, when Mr. Knightley startled her, by saying,
"You will not ask me what is the point of envy.—You are determined, I see, to have no curiosity.—You are wise—but I cannot be wise. Emma, I must tell you what you will not ask, though I may wish it unsaid the next moment."
"Oh! then, don't speak it, don't speak it," she eagerly cried. "Take a little time, consider, do not commit yourself."
"Thank you," said he, in an accent of deep mortification, and not another syllable followed.
Emma could not bear to give him pain. He was wishing to confide in her—perhaps to consult her;—cost her what it would, she would listen. She might assist his resolution, or reconcile him to it; she might give just praise to Harriet, or, by representing to him his own independence, relieve him from that state of indecision, which must be more intolerable than any alternative to such a mind as his.—They had reached the house.
"You are going in, I suppose?" said he.
"No,"—replied Emma—quite confirmed by the depressed manner in which he still spoke—"I should like to take another turn. Mr. Perry is not gone." And, after proceeding a few steps, she added—"I stopped you ungraciously, just now, Mr. Knightley, and, I am afraid, gave you pain.—But if you have any wish to speak openly to me as a friend, or to ask my opinion of any thing that you may have in contemplation—as a friend, indeed, you may command me.—I will hear whatever you like. I will tell you exactly what I think."
"As a friend!"—repeated Mr. Knightley.—"Emma, that I fear is a word—No, I have no wish—Stay, yes, why should I hesitate?—I have gone too far already for concealment.—Emma, I accept your offer—Extraordinary as it may seem, I accept it, and refer myself to you as a friend.—Tell me, then, have I no chance of ever succeeding?"
He stopped in his earnestness to look the question, and the expression of his eyes overpowered her.
"My dearest Emma," said he, "for dearest you will always be, whatever the event of this hour's conversation, my dearest, most beloved Emma—tell me at once. Say 'No,' if it is to be said."—She could really say nothing.—"You are silent," he cried, with great animation; "absolutely silent! at present I ask no more."
Emma was almost ready to sink under the agitation of this moment. The dread of being awakened from the happiest dream, was perhaps the most prominent feeling.
"I cannot make speeches, Emma:" he soon resumed; and in a tone of such sincere, decided, intelligible tenderness as was tolerably convincing.—"If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more. But you know what I am.—You hear nothing but truth from me.—I have blamed you, and lectured you, and you have borne it as no other woman in England would have borne it.—Bear with the truths I would tell you now, dearest Emma, as well as you have borne with them. The manner, perhaps, may have as little to recommend them. God knows, I have been a very indifferent lover.—But you understand me.—Yes, you see, you understand my feelings—and will return them if you can. At present, I ask only to hear, once to hear your voice.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“No, indeed, I shall grant you nothing. I always take the part of my own sex. I do indeed. I give you notice-- You will find me a formidable antagonist on that point. I always stand up for women.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“I shall be sure to say three dull things as soon as ever I open my mouth, shan’t I? (looking round with the most good-humoured dependence on every body’s assent)— Do not you all think I shall?”

Emma could not resist.

“Ah! ma’am, but there may be a difficulty. Pardon me— but you will be limited as to number—only three at once.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“Well, evil to some is always good to others.”
Jane Austen, Emma
tags: evil, good
“What a blessing it is, when undue influence does not survive the grave!”
Jane Austen, Emma
“My being charming…is not quite enough to induce me to marry. I must find other people charming - one other person at least.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“Every thing was to take its natural course, however, neither impelled nor assisted.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“Do not deceive yourself; do not be run away with by gratitude and compassion.”
Jane Austen, Emma
“I have observed, Mrs Elton, in the course of my life, that if things are going outwardly one month, they are sure to mend the next.”
Jane Austen, Emma

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