The Pickwick Papers Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
The Pickwick Papers The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens
19,605 ratings, 3.82 average rating, 1,142 reviews
The Pickwick Papers Quotes (showing 1-30 of 44)
“Poetry makes life what lights and music do the stage.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“There are very few moments in a man's existence when he experiences so much ludicrous distress, or meets with so little charitable commiseration, as when he is in pursuit of his own hat.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“She dotes on poetry, sir. She adores it; I may say that her whole soul and mind are wound up, and entwined with it. She has produced some delightful pieces, herself, sir. You may have met with her 'Ode to an Expiring Frog,' sir.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“Can I view thee panting, lying
On thy stomach, without sighing;
Can I unmoved see thee dying
On a log
Expiring frog!”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
tags: humor
“what was over couldn't be begun, and what couldn't be cured must be endured;”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“Man is but mortal; and there is a point beyond which human courage cannot extend.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“Hush. Don't ask any questions. It's always best on these occasions to do what the mob do."
"But suppose there are two mobs?" suggested Mr. Snodgrass.
"Shout with the largest," replied Mr. Pickwick.
Volumes could not have said more.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
tags: mob, tip
“It is the fate of most men who mingle with the world, and attain even the prime of life, to make many real friends, and lose them in the course of nature. It is the fate of all authors or chroniclers to create imaginary friends, and lose them in the course of art. Nor is this the full extent of their misfortunes; for they are required to furnish an account of them besides.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“Mr. Pickwick was a philosopher, but philosophers are only men in armour, after all.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“I never heerd...nor read of nor see in picters, any angel in tights and gaiters...but...he's a reg'lar thoroughbred angel for all that.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
tags: angel
“You've got the key of the street.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
tags: street
“He has got his discharge, by G-! said the man.
He had. But he had grown so like death in life, that they knew not when he died.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“The gout is a complaint as arises from too much ease and comfort. If ever you're attacked with the gout, sir, jist you marry a widder as has got a good loud woice, with a decent notion of usin' it, and you'll never have the gout agin.... I can warrant it to drive away any illness as is caused by too much jollity.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“Such,' thought Mr. Pickwick, 'are the narrow views of those philosophers who, content with examining the things that lie before them, look not to the truths which are hidden beyond.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“Poetry's unnat'ral; no man ever talked in poetry 'cept a beadle on boxin' day, or Warren's blackin' or Rowland's oil, or some o' them low fellows; never you let yourself down to talk poetry, my boy.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“Women, after all, gentlemen,' said the enthusiastic Mr. Snodgrass, 'are the great props and comforts of our existance.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“Mr. Pickwick gazed through his spectacles for an instant on the advancing mass, and then fairly turned his back and -- we will not say fled; firstly because it is an ignoble term, and, secondly, because Mr. Pickwick's figure was by no means adapted for that mode of retreat...”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“It was a glorious supper. There was kippered salmon, and Finnan haddocks, and a lamb's head, and a haggis—a celebrated Scotch dish, gentlemen, which my uncle used to say always looked to him, when it came to table, very much like a Cupid's stomach—and a great many other things besides, that I forget the names of, but very good things, notwithstanding.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“She never went out herself, and like a great many other old ladies of the same stamp, she was apt to consider it an act of domestic treason, if anybody else took the liberty of doing what she couldn't.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“Mr Pickwick awoke the next morning, there was not a symptom of rheumatism about him; which proves, as Mr Bob Sawyer very justly observed, that there is nothing like hot punch in such cases; and that if ever hot punch did fail to act as a preventive, it was merely because the patient fell in to the vulgar error of not taking enough of it.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“Ah! poetry makes life what light and music do the stage—strip the one of the false embellishments, and the other of its illusions, and what is there real in either to live or care for?”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“You!’ said the old man contemptuously. ‘What do you know of the time when young men shut themselves up in those lonely rooms, and read and read, hour after hour, and night after night, till their reason wandered beneath their midnight studies; till their mental powers were exhausted; till morning’s light brought no freshness or health to them; and they sank beneath the unnatural devotion of their youthful energies to their dry old books?”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“you'll find that as you get vider, you'll get viser. Vidth and visdom, Sammy, alvays grows together.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“    'It wasn't the wine,' murmured Mr. Snodgrass, in a broken voice. 'It was the salmon.' (Somehow or other, it never is the wine, in these cases.)”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“Time and feeding had expanded that once romantic form; the black silk waistcoat had become more and more developed; inch by inch had the gold watch-chain beneath it disappeared from within the range of Tupman's vision; and gradually had the capacious chin encroached upon the borders of the white cravat: but the soul of Tupman had known no change—admiration of the fair sex was still its ruling passion.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“How many crumpets, at a sittin', do you think 'ud kill me off at once?" says the patient. "I don't know," says the doctor. "Do you think half-a-crown's wurth 'ud do it?" says the patient. "I think it might," says the doctor.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“... But love is blind; and Nathaniel had a cast in his eye; and perhaps these two circumstances, taken together, prevented his seeing the matter in its proper light.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“I don't know whether any of you, gentlemen, ever partook of a real substantial hospitable Scotch breakfast, and then went out to a slight lunch of a bushel of oysters, a dozen or so of bottled ale, and a noggin or two of whiskey to close up with. If you ever did, you will agree with me that it requires a pretty strong head to go out to dinner and supper afterwards.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“Don't say nothin' wotever about it, ma'am,' replied Sam. 'I only assisted natur, ma'am; as the doctor said to the boy's mother, after he'd bled him to death.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
“Mr. Tracy Tupman—the too susceptible Tupman, who to the wisdom and experience of maturer years superadded the enthusiasm and ardour of a boy in the most interesting and pardonable of human weaknesses—love.”
Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

« previous 1

All Quotes
Quotes By Charles Dickens
Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game