Starting out in the evening Quotes

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Starting out in the evening Starting out in the evening by Brian Morton
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Starting out in the evening Quotes (showing 1-30 of 53)
“The world, the human world, is bound together not by protons and electrons, but by stories.”
Brian Morton, Starting out in the evening
“...an artist doesn't really need a great deal of experience. One heartbreak can produce many novels. But you have to have a heart that can break.”
Brian Morton, Starting out in the evening
“To sit across the table and talk with someone you love is itself a complex engagement, with an exhaustingly subtle flow of information; to go to bed with someone--to carry your conversation into the realm of the body, a realm of insecurity and fear as well as pleasure--was always fraught with the sad evidence of how difficult it is to understand another person and make yourself understood.”
Brian Morton, Starting out in the evening
“The moments of beauty, the moments when you feel blessed, are only moments; but memory and imagination, treasuring them, can string them together... Everything else passes away; that which you love remains.”
Brian Morton, Starting out in the evening
“So you can keep going. You can stay young. There's no inevitable law of diminishment: everyone who fades fades for his own reason.”
Brian Morton, Starting out in the evening
“What matters, finally, isn't finding the kind of person you think you should
love. What matters is finding someone you feel more alive with.”
Brian Morton, Starting out in the evening
“A man can't understand how a woman feels--how she can offer up her entire life to him. The man thinks she's bringing him a burden. He doesn't understand that she's trying to give him a gift.”
Brian Morton, Starting out in the evening
“There are certain situations in which you can't convey what you mean. Words don't always work.”
Brian Morton, Starting out in the evening
“So much of human life is animal life: we respond to each other as animals.”
Brian Morton, Starting out in the evening
“The thing is to let life assault you, make yourself as defenseless as you can. If it bruises you, don't protest. Love your fate.”
Brian Morton, Starting out in the evening
“Subtlety and indirection are important tools, but you can't scale the highest peaks with these tools alone.”
Brian Morton, Starting out in the evening
“It's foolish to speak of your happiness before you're sure you have it.”
Brian Morton, Starting out in the evening
“...they hadlived, they'd lived intensely. But no matter how deeply you live, it comes to this in the end: one of you will be gone and the other will be in mourning.”
Brian Morton, Starting out in the evening
“What appalled Schiller about these libraries was that they featured nothing off the beaten track: no tattered paperbacks; no evidence of distinctive personal interests; no tokens of long intellectual detours passionately explored.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“But Ariel felt sure that every moment is indestructible, and that somewhere in the universe, tucked away in some hidden fold of time, their moment together still endured. Somewhere she was still a young girl, hurled about by life, confessing her troubles, and he was a calm older man, listening to her as her father couldn’t listen and telling her to have courage.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“She was thinking that she was foolish to hope that someday, if she found the right path, she would be continuously happy. No one is that fortunate. The moments of beauty, the moments when you feel blessed, are only moments; but memory and imagination, treasuring them, can string them together like the delicate glories on the necklace her father had given her. Everything else passes away; that which you love remains. She had to believe this, even if she wasn’t sure it was true.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“We congratulate ourselves on having abandoned our vices, when it is they who have abandoned us.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“These friends were his anchor; they kept him from floating off into the uncharted realms of his own self-regard.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“He was a muted egomaniac—he tried to keep his grandiosity under cover—but an egomaniac nonetheless.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“And we were driving there with Florence and Stella. I was complaining about having to go all the way up to Connecticut, and you said, ‘Look at it this way: we have two obligations to our old friends. We have to go to their weddings and we have to go to their funerals. With George, we’re halfway home.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“The primary human need, he decided—stronger than the need for food or sex or love—is the need for recognition, the need to make a mark in the world.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“For years all the people in his life had been people he’d known for a long time;”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“The Refusal of the Keys: it seemed like something from mythology, from medieval legend.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“I regretted it. But it can’t be avoided. A writer has to use everything he has. If you want to write, you have to be willing to be a son of a bitch sometimes.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“Maybe, she thought, it was because it was still too new. It’s foolish to speak of your happiness before you’re sure you have it.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“It was hard for him to insist, because it hurt her, and because he knew it would drive her away. But he couldn’t string a woman along anymore. He felt like a rat, but a rat at peace with itself.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“Fear of any undertaking, to her way of thinking, was usually a reason to go ahead with it.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“She knew that this relationship wasn’t as important to him as it was to her. If he was being honest he’d probably admit that she was the second most important thing in his life right now.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“A man can’t understand how a woman feels—how she can offer up her entire life to him. The man thinks she’s bringing him a burden. He doesn’t understand that she’s trying to give him a gift.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening
“His kisses were too rote; they were assembly-line kisses. She wanted complex kisses; she wanted each kiss to be a conversation.”
Brian Morton, Starting Out in the Evening

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