The Housekeeper and the Professor Quotes

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The Housekeeper and the Professor The Housekeeper and the Professor by Yōko Ogawa
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The Housekeeper and the Professor Quotes (showing 1-30 of 30)
“Solving a problem for which you know there’s an answer is like climbing a mountain with a guide, along a trail someone else has laid. In mathematics, the truth is somewhere out there in a place no one knows, beyond all the beaten paths. And it’s not always at the top of the mountain. It might be in a crack on the smoothest cliff or somewhere deep in the valley.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“He treated Root exactly as he treated prime numbers. For him, primes were the base on which all other natural numbers relied; and children were the foundation of everything worthwhile in the adult world”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
tags: love
“The Professor never really seemed to care whether we figured out the right answer to a problem. He preferred our wild, desperate guesses to silence, and he was even more delighted when those guesses led to new problems that took us beyond the original one. He had a special feeling for what he called the "correct miscalculation," for he believed that mistakes were often as revealing as the right answers.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“Soon after I began working for the Professor, I realized that he talked about numbers whenever he was unsure of what to say or do. Numbers were also his way of reaching out to the world. They were safe, a source of comfort.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“A problem isn't finished just because you've found the right answer.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“...The pages and pages of complex, impenetrable calculations might have contained the secrets of the universe, copied out of God's notebook.
In my imagination, I saw the creator of the universe sitting in some distant corner of the sky, weaving a pattern of delicate lace so fine that that even the faintest light would shine through it. The lace stretches out infinitely in every direction, billowing gently in the cosmic breeze. You want desperately to touch it, hold it up to the light, rub it against your cheek. And all we ask is to be able to re-create the pattern, weave it again with numbers, somehow, in our own language; to make the tiniest fragment our own, to bring it back to eart.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“He preferred smart questions to smart answers.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“Among the many things that made the Professor an excellent teacher was the fact that he wasn't afraid to say 'we don't know.' For the Professor, there was no shame in admitting you didn't have the answer, it was a necessary step toward the truth. It was as important to teach us about the unknown or the unknowable as it was to teach us what had already been safely proven.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“The room was filled with a kind of stillness. Not simply an absence of noise, but an accumulation of layers of silence...”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“It was clear that he didn't remember me from one day to the next. The note clipped to his sleeve simply informed him that it was not our first meeting, but it could not bring back the memory of the time we had spent together.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
tags: memory
“Solving a problem for which you know there's an answer is like climbing a mountain with a guide, along a trail someone else has laid.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“Because he had been- and in many ways still was- such a brilliant man, he no doubt understood the nature of his memory problem. It wasn't pride that prevented him from asking for help but a deep aversion to causing more trouble than necessary for those of us who lived in the normal world.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“The truly correct proof is one that strikes a harmonious balance between strength and flexibility. There are plenty of proofs that are technically correct but are messy and inelegant or counterintuitive. But it's not something you can put into words — explaining why a formula is beautiful is like trying to explain why the stars are beautiful.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“I prefer pi.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“I was impressed by the delicate weaving of the numbers. No matter how carefully you unraveled a thread, a single moment of inattention could leave you stranded, with no clue what to do next. In all his years of study, the Professor had managed to glimpse several pieces of the lace. I could only hope that some part of him remembered the exquisite pattern.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“He discounted the value of his own efforts, and seemed to feel that anyone would have done the same.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“Root always showed amazing insight when it came to the Professor.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“So you think that zero was there waiting for us when humans came into being,like the flowers and the stars? You should have more respect for human progress. We made the zero, through great pain and struggle.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“Are you just going to stand there frying hamburgers while your child could be dying in a fire?”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“It seemed as though the secret of the universe had miraculously appeared right here at our feet, as though God’s notebook had opened under our bench.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“The Professor never really seemed to care whether we figured out the right answer to a problem. He preferred our wild, desperate guesses to silence, and he was even more delighted when those guesses led to new problems that took us beyond the original one.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“He had a special feeling for what he called the “correct miscalculation,” for he believed that mistakes were often as revealing as the right answers. This gave us confidence even when our best efforts came to nothing.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“The mathematics stacks were as silent and empty as ever—apparently no one suspected the riches hidden there.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“he seemed convinced that children’s questions were much more important than those of an adult. He preferred smart questions to smart answers.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“They say it'll be even hotter tomorrow. that's how we spend the summer. complaining about the heat.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
tags: summer
“It’s like copying truths from God’s notebook, though we aren’t always sure where to find this notebook or when it will be open.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“Math has proven the existence of God, because it is absolute and without contradiction; but the devil must exist as well, because we cannot prove it”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“I needed this eternal truth [...] I needed the sense that this invisible world was somehow propping up the visible one, that this one, true line extended infinitely, without width or area, confidently piercing through the shadows. Somehow, this line would help me find peace.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“children were the foundation of everything worthwhile in the adult world.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor
“Giáo sư coi Căn như số nguyên tố. Ông cho rằng trẻ con là những nguyên tử vô cùng cần thiết với những người lớn như chúng tôi, tựa như số nguyên tố là nhân tố cấu thành mọi số tự nhiên khác. Ông tin rằng bản thân mình tồn tại đượclà nhờ những đứa trẻ.”
Yōko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor

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