Pride and Prejudice Quotes

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Pride and Prejudice Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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Pride and Prejudice Quotes (showing 31-60 of 1,139)
“You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.

-Mr. Darcy”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Mary wished to say something very sensible, but knew not how.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Oh, Lizzy! do anything rather than marry without affection.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Nobody can tell what I suffer! But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me, and I am in no humor at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“I certainly have not the talent which some people possess," said Darcy, "of conversing easily with those I have never seen before. I cannot catch their tone of conversation, or appear interested in their concerns, as I often see done.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“It's been many years since I had such an exemplary vegetable.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Occupied in observing Mr. Bingley’s attentions to her sister, Elizabeth was far from suspecting that she was herself becoming an object of some interest in the eyes of his friend. Mr. Darcy had at first scarcely allowed her to be pretty: he had looked at her without admiration at the ball; and when they next met, he looked at her only to criticise. But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she had hardly a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes. To this discovery succeeded some others equally mortifying. Though he had detected with a critical eye more than one failure of perfect symmetry in her form, he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable world, he was caught by their easy playfulness. Of this she was perfectly unaware: to her he was only the man who made himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough to dance with.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“I am only resolved to act in that manner, which will, in my own opinion, constitute my happiness, without reference to you, or to any person so wholly unconnected with me.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“I am excessively diverted. ”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“They were within twenty yards of each other, and so abrupt was his appearance, that it was impossible to avoid his sight. Their eyes instantly met, and the cheeks of each were overspread with the deepest blush. He absolutely started, and for a moment seemed immoveable from surprise; but shortly recovering himself, advanced towards the party, and spoke to Elizabeth, if not in terms of perfect composure, at least of perfect civility.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“But people themselves alter so much, that there is something new to be observed in them for ever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“One cannot be always laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Do not consider me now as an elegant female intending to plague you, but as a rational creature speaking the truth from her heart.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Nothing is more deceitful," said Darcy, "than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“I might as well enquire,” replied she, “why with so evident a design of offending and insulting me, you chose to tell me that you liked me against your will, against your reason, and even against your character?”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Now be sincere; did you admire me for my impertinence?"

"For the liveliness of your mind, I did.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Do not give way to useless alarm; though it is right to be prepared for the worst, there is no occasion to look on it as certain.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“How despicably I have acted!" she cried; "I, who have prided myself on my discernment! I, who have valued myself on my abilities! who have often disdained the generous candour of my sister, and gratified my vanity in useless or blameable mistrust! How humiliating is this discovery! Yet, how just a humiliation! Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly. Pleased with the preference of one, and offended by the neglect of the other, on the very beginning of our aquaintance, I have courted prepossession and ignorance, and driven reason away, where either were concerned. Till this moment I never knew myself.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“They walked on, without knowing in what direction. There was too much to be thought, and felt, and said, for attention to any other objects.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“I have been used to consider poetry as "the food of love" said Darcy.

"Of a fine, stout, healthy love it may. Everything nourishes what is
strong already. But if it be only a slight, thin sort of inclination, I
am convinced that one good sonnet will starve it entirely away.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Have a little compassion on my nerves. You tear them to pieces.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“It is happy for you that you possess the talent of flattering with delicacy. May I ask whether these pleasing attentions proceed from the impulse of the moment, or are they the result of previous study?”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Could there be finer symptoms? Is not general incivility the very essence of love?”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“From all that I can collect by your manner of talking, you must be two of the silliest girls in the country. I have suspected it some time, but I am now convinced.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“A person who can write a long letter with ease, cannot write ill.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“One word from you shall silence me forever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

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