Pride and Prejudice Quotes

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Pride and Prejudice Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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Pride and Prejudice Quotes (showing 1-30 of 912)
“A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Angry people are not always wise.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“What are men to rocks and mountains?”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“I must learn to be content with being happier than I deserve.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“I have not the pleasure of understanding you.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors, and laugh at them in our turn?”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“From the very beginning— from the first moment, I may almost say— of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of the feelings of others, were such as to form the groundwork of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“I am the happiest creature in the world. Perhaps other people have said so before, but not one with such justice. I am happier even than Jane; she only smiles, I laugh.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“We all know him to be a proud, unpleasant sort of man; but this would be nothing if you really liked him.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“I have faults enough, but they are not, I hope, of understanding. My temper I dare not vouch for. It is, I believe, too little yielding— certainly too little for the convenience of the world. I cannot forget the follies and vices of other so soon as I ought, nor their offenses against myself. My feelings are not puffed about with every attempt to move them. My temper would perhaps be called resentful. My good opinion once lost, is lost forever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“A girl likes to be crossed a little in love now and then.
It is something to think of”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Till this moment I never knew myself.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“He is a gentleman, and I am a gentleman's daughter. So far we are equal.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents. Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins, and I will never see you again if you do.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“My good opinion once lost is lost forever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“We are all fools in love”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Our scars make us know that our past was for real”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“Her heart did whisper that he had done it for her.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil, a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome."
"And your defect is a propensity to hate everybody."
"And yours," he replied with a smile, "is wilfully to misunderstand them.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
“I have been a selfish being all my life, in practice, though not in principle. As a child I was taught what was right, but I was not taught to correct my temper. I was given good principles, but left to follow them in pride and conceit. Unfortunately an only son (for many years an only child), I was spoilt by my parents, who, though good themselves (my father, particularly, all that was benevolent and amiable), allowed, encouraged, almost taught me to be selfish and overbearing; to care for none beyond my own family circle; to think meanly of all the rest of the world; to wish at least to think meanly of their sense and worth compared with my own. Such I was, from eight to eight and twenty; and such I might still have been but for you, dearest, loveliest Elizabeth! What do I not owe you! You taught me a lesson, hard indeed at first, but most advantageous. By you, I was properly humbled. I came to you without a doubt of my reception. You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

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