Sense and Sensibility Quotes

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Sense and Sensibility Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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Sense and Sensibility Quotes (showing 1-30 of 178)
“The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!”
Jane Austen, Sense And Sensibility
“If I could but know his heart, everything would become easy.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
tags: love
“Know your own happiness. You want nothing but patience- or give it a more fascinating name, call it hope.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“It is not everyone,' said Elinor, 'who has your passion for dead leaves.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“I wish, as well as everybody else, to be perfectly happy; but, like everybody else, it must be in my own way.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy;—it is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“I never wish to offend, but I am so foolishly shy, that I often seem negligent, when I am only kept back by my natural awkwardness ... Shyness is only the effect of a sense of inferiority in some way or other. If I could persuade myself that my manners were perfectly easy and graceful, I should not be shy.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“I come here with no expectations, only to profess, now that I am at liberty to do so, that my heart is and always will be yours.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“I will be calm. I will be mistress of myself.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“Elinor agreed with it all, for she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“She was stronger alone…”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“Know your own happiness.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“There is something so amiable in the prejudices of a young mind, that one is sorry to see them give way to the reception of more general opinions.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“Always resignation and acceptance. Always prudence and honour and duty. Elinor, where is your heart?”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“Elinor could sit still no longer. She almost ran out of the room, and as soon as the door was closed, burst into tears of joy, which at first she thought would never cease.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“to hope was to expect”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“Eleanor went to her room "where she was free to think and be wretched.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“To wish was to hope, and to hope was to expect”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“I have not wanted syllables where actions have spoken so plainly.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“I never wish to offend, but I am so foolishly shy, that I often seem negligent, when I am only kept back by my natural awkwardness."

-Edward Ferrars”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“Life could do nothing for her, beyond giving time for a better preparation for death.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“What do you know of my heart? What do you know of anything but your own suffering. For weeks, Marianne, I've had this pressing on me without being at liberty to speak of it to a single creature. It was forced on me by the very person whose prior claims ruined all my hope. I have endured her exultations again and again whilst knowing myself to be divided from Edward forever. Believe me, Marianne, had I not been bound to silence I could have provided proof enough of a broken heart, even for you.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“I could not be happy with a man whose taste did not in every point coincide with my own. He must enter in all my feelings; the same books, the same music must charm us both.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“It was told to me, it was in a manner forced on me by the very person herself whose prior engagement ruined all my prospects, and told me, as I thought, with triumph. This person's suspicions, therefore, I have had to oppose by endeavouring to appear indifferent where I have been most deeply interested; and it has not been only once; I have had her hopes and exultations to listen to again and again. I have known myself to be divided from Edward forever, without hearing one circumstance that could make me less desire the connection. Nothing has proved him unworthy; nor has anything declared him indifferent to me. I have had to content against the unkindness of his sister and the insolence of his mother, and have suffered the punishment of an attachment without enjoying its advantages. And all this has been going on at the time when, as you too well know, it has not been my only unhappiness. If you can think me capable of ever feeling, surely you may suppose that I have suffered now.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“But remember that the pain of parting from friends will be felt by everybody at times, whatever be their education or state. Know your own happiness. You want nothing but patience; or give it a more fascinating name: call it hope.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“I am excessively fond of a cottage; there is always so much comfort, so much elegance about them. And I protest, if I had any money to spare, I should buy a little land and build one myself, within a short distance of London, where I might drive myself down at any time, and collect a few friends about me and be happy. I advise everybody who is going to build, to build a cottage.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“Mrs. Jennings was a widow, with an ample jointure. She had only two daughters, both of whom she had lived to see respectably married, and she had now therefore nothing to do but to marry all the rest of the world.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“Pray, pray be composed, and do not betray what you feel to every body present”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“That is what I like; that is what a young man ought to be. Whatever be his pursuits, his eagerness in them should know no moderation, and leave him no sense of fatigue.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
“Yes, I found myself, by insensible degrees, sincerely fond of her; and the happiest hours of my life were what I spent with her.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility

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