The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson Quotes

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The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson by Ralph Waldo Emerson
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The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson Quotes (showing 1-30 of 53)
“Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us, or we find it not.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emerson's Essays
“I hate quotations. Tell me what you know.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“At times the whole world seems to be in conspiracy to importune you with emphatic trifles. Friend, client, child, sickness, fear, want, charity, all knock at once at thy closet door and say,—'Come out unto us.' But keep thy state; come not into their confusion. The power men possess to annoy me I give them by a weak curiosity. No man can come near me but through my act.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Doubt not, O poet, but persist. Say 'It is in me, and shall out.' Stand there, balked and dumb, stuttering and stammering, hissed and hooted, stand and strive, until at last rage draw out of thee that dream-power which every night shows thee is thine own; a power transcending all limit and privacy, and by virtue of which a man is the conductor of the whole river of electricity.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“We are immensed in beauty, but our eyes have no clear vision.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“When we are young, we spend much time and pains in filling our note-books with all definitions of Religion, Love, Poetry, Politics, Art, in the hope that, in the course of a few years, we shall have condensed into our encyclopaedia the net value of all the theories at which the world has yet arrived. But year after year our tables get no completeness, and at last we discover that our curve is a parabola, whose arcs will never meet.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays
“Every violation of truth is not only a sort of suicide in the liar, but is a stab at the health of human society.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays: First and Second Series
“God offers to every mind a choice between repose and truth. take which you please--you can never have both. [Essay on Intellect]”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“The life of truth is cold.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Every revolution was first a thought in one man's mind, and when the same thought occurs to another man, it is the key to that era.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“We, as we read, must become Greeks, Romans, Turks, priest and king, martyr and executioner; must fasten these images to some reality in our secret experience, or we shall learn nothing rightly.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“I unsettle all things.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays
“It is not metres, but a metre-making argument that makes a poem,—a thought so passionate and alive that like the spirit of a plant or an animal it has an architecture of its own, and adorns nature with a new thing. The thought and the form are equal in the order of time, but in the order of genesis the thought is prior to the form.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“If we are related, we shall meet. It was a tradition of the ancient world, that no metamorphosis could hide a god from a god; and there is a Greek verse which runs,

"The Gods are to each other not unknown."

Friends also follow the laws of divine necessity; they gravitate to each other, and cannot otherwise.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emerson's Essays
“Why covet a knowledge of new facts? Day and night, house and garden, a few books, a few actions, serve us as well as would all trades and all spectacles. We are far from having exhausted the significance of the few symbols we use. We can come to use them yet with a terrible simplicity.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“the mystic must be steadily told,—All that you say is just as true without the tedious use of that symbol as with it. Let us have a little algebra, instead of this trite rhetoric,—universal signs, instead of these village symbols,—and we shall both be gainers. The history of hierarchies seems to show that all religious error consisted in making the symbol too stark and solid, and was at last nothing but an excess of the organ of language.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Life goes headlong. We chase some flying scheme, or we are hunted by some fear or command behind us. But if suddenly we encounter a friend, we pause; our heat and hurry look foolish enough; now pause, now possession, is required, and the power to swell the moment from the resources of the heart. The moment is all, in all noble relations.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men,—that is genius. [148] Speak your latent conviction, and it shall be the universal sense;”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“What I must do is all that concerns me, not what the people think. This rule, equally arduous in actual and in intellectual life, may serve for the whole distinction between greatness and meanness. It is the harder, because you will always find those who think they know what is your duty better than you know it. It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion; it is easy in solitude to live after our own; but the great man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude. [172]”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“I have no expectation that any man will read history aright who thinks that what was done in a remote age, by men whose names have resounded far, has any deeper sense than what he is doing today.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“There are many eyes that can detect and honor the prudent and household virtues; there are many that can discern Genius on his starry track, though the mob is incapable; but when that love which is all-suffering, all-abstaining, all-aspiring, which has vowed to itself, that it will be a wretch and also a fool in this world, sooner than soil its white hands by any compliances, comes into our streets and houses, --only the pure and aspiring can know its face, and the only compliment they can pay it, is to own it.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“There is no great and no small
To the Soul that maketh all:
And where it cometh, all things are
And it cometh everywhere.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays: First and Second Series
“Of the works of this mind history is the record. Its genius is illustrated by the entire series of days. Man is explicable by nothing less than all his history. Without hurry, without rest, the human spirit goes forth from the beginning to embody every faculty, every thought, every emotion, which belongs to it, in appropriate events. But the thought is always prior to the fact; all the facts of history preexist in the mind as laws. Each law in turn is made by circumstances predominant, and the limits of nature give power to but one at a time. A man is the whole encyclopaedia of facts. The creation of a thousand forests is in one acorn, and Egypt, Greece, Rome, Gaul, Britain, America, lie folded already in the first man. Epoch after epoch, camp, kingdom, empire, republic, democracy, are merely the application of his manifold spirit to the manifold world.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays: First and Second Series
“Rectitude is a perpetual victory, celebrated not by cries of joy but by serenity, which is joy fixed or habitual.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Our faith comes in moments; our vice is habitual.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays: First and Second Series
“God will not have his work made manifest by cowards. A man is relieved and gay when he has put his heart into his work and done his best; but what he has said or done otherwise shall give him no peace.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“There is a time in every man's education when he arrives at the conviction that envy is ignorance; that imitation is suicide; [154] that he must take himself for better, for worse, as his portion; that though the wide universe is full of good, no kernel of nourishing corn can come to him but through his toil bestowed on that plot of ground which is given to him to till.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men,—that is genius.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“They measure their esteem of each other by what each has, and not by what each is. But a cultivated man becomes ashamed of his property, out of new respect for his nature.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“What have I to do with the sacredness of traditions, if I live wholly from within?" my friend suggested,—"But these impulses may be from below, not from above." I replied, "They do not seem to me to be such; but if I am the Devil's child, I will live then from the Devil." No law can be sacred to me but that of my nature. Good and bad are but names very readily transferable to that or this; the only right is what is after my constitution; the only wrong what is against it.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson

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