Persuasion Quotes

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Persuasion Persuasion by Jane Austen
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Persuasion Quotes (showing 1-30 of 192)
“You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope...I have loved none but you.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“I hate to hear you talk about all women as if they were fine ladies instead of rational creatures. None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“I can listen no longer in silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach. You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever. I offer myself to you again with a heart even more your own than when you almost broke it, eight years and a half ago. Dare not say that man forgets sooner than woman, that his love has an earlier death. I have loved none but you. Unjust I may have been, weak and resentful I have been, but never inconstant. You alone have brought me to Bath. For you alone, I think and plan. Have you not seen this? Can you fail to have understood my wishes? I had not waited even these ten days, could I have read your feelings, as I think you must have penetrated mine. I can hardly write. I am every instant hearing something which overpowers me. You sink your voice, but I can distinguish the tones of that voice when they would be lost on others. Too good, too excellent creature! You do us justice, indeed. You do believe that there is true attachment and constancy among men. Believe it to be most fervent, most undeviating, in F. W.

I must go, uncertain of my fate; but I shall return hither, or follow your party, as soon as possible. A word, a look, will be enough to decide whether I enter your father's house this evening or never.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“My idea of good company...is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.'
'You are mistaken,' said he gently, 'that is not good company, that is the best.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“There could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“All the privilege I claim for my own sex (it is not a very enviable one: you need not covet it), is that of loving longest, when existence or when hope is gone!”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“How quick come the reasons for approving what we like.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
tags: life
“I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which had not something to say upon woman's inconstancy. Songs and proverbs, all talk of woman's fickleness. But perhaps you will say, these were all written by men."

"Perhaps I shall. Yes, yes, if you please, no reference to examples in books. Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“One man's ways may be as good as another's, but we all like our own best.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“A man does not recover from such devotion of the heart to such a woman! He ought not; he does not.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“Time will explain.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
tags: time
“She hoped to be wise and reasonable in time; but alas! Alas! She must confess to herself that she was not wise yet.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“...when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“Now they were as strangers; nay worse than strangers, for they could never become acquainted.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“Anne hoped she had outlived the age of blushing; but the age of emotion she certainly had not.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“She had been forced into prudence in her youth, she learned romance as she grew older: the natural sequel of an unnatural beginning.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“Dare not say that man forgets sooner than woman, that his love has an earlier death. I have loved none but you.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“Her pleasure in the walk must arise from the exercise and the day, from the view of the last smiles of the year upon the tawny leaves and withered hedges, and from repeating to herself some few of the thousand poetical descriptions extant of autumn--that season of peculiar and inexhaustible influence on the mind of taste and tenderness--that season which has drawn from every poet worthy of being read some attempt at description, or some lines of feeling.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“She understood him. He could not forgive her,-but he could not be unfeeling. Though condemning her for the past, and considering it with high and unjest resentment, though perfectly careless of her, and though becoming attached to another, still he could not see her suffer, without the desire of giving her relief. It was a remainder of former sentiment; it was an impuse of pure, though unacknowledged friendship; it was a proof of his own warm and amiable heart, which she could not contemplate without emotions so compounded of pleasure and pain, that she knew not which prevailed.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“Let us never underestimate the power of a well-written letter.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“If there is any thing disagreeable going on, men are always sure to get out of it.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“They had no conversation together, no intercourse but what the commonest civility required. Once so much to each other! Now nothing! There had been a time, when of all the large party now filling the drawing-room at Uppercross, they would have found it most difficult to cease to speak to one another. With the exception, perhaps, of Admiral and Mrs. Croft, who seemed particularly attached and happy, (Anne could allow no other exception even among the married couples) there could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so simliar, no feelings so in unison, no countenances so beloved. Now they were as strangers; nay, worse than strangers, for they could never become aquainted. It was a perpetual estrangement.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“His cold politeness, his ceremonious grace, were worse than anything.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“The last few hours were certainly very painful," replied Anne: "but when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure. One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering-”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“We certainly do not forget you, so soon as you forget us. It is, perhaps, our fate rather than our merit. We cannot help ourselves.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“I am not fond of the idea of my shrubberies being always approachable.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“I walk: I prefer walking.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion
“She felt that she could so much more depend upon the sincerity of those who sometimes looked or said a careless or a hasty thing, than of those whose presence of mind never varied, whose tongue never slipped.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion

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