The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami
118,505 ratings, 4.18 average rating, 8,251 reviews
Open Preview
The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle Quotes (showing 1-30 of 242)
“But even so, every now and then I would feel a violent stab of loneliness. The very water I drink, the very air I breathe, would feel like long, sharp needles. The pages of a book in my hands would take on the threatening metallic gleam of razor blades. I could hear the roots of loneliness creeping through me when the world was hushed at four o'clock in the morning.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“Is it possible, in the final analysis, for one human being to achieve perfect understanding of another?
We can invest enormous time and energy in serious efforts to know another person, but in the end, how close can we come to that person's essence? We convince ourselves that we know the other person well, but do we really know anything important about anyone?”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“Here's what I think, Mr. Wind-Up Bird," said May Kasahara. "Everybody's born with some different thing at the core of their existence. And that thing, whatever it is, becomes like a heat source that runs each person from the inside. I have one too, of course. Like everybody else. But sometimes it gets out of hand. It swells or shrinks inside me, and it shakes me up. What I'd really like to do is find a way to communicate that feeling to another person. But I can't seem to do it. They just don't get it. Of course, the problem could be that I'm not explaining it very well, but I think it's because they're not listening very well. They pretend to be listening, but they're not, really. So I get worked up sometimes, and I do some crazy things.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
tags: life
“Memories and thoughts age, just as people do. But certain thoughts can never age, and certain memories can never fade.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“Spend your money on the things money can buy. Spend your time on the things money can’t buy.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“I realize full well how hard it must be to go on living alone in a place from which someone has left you, but there is nothing so cruel in this world as the desolation of having nothing to hope for.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“In a place far away from anyone or anywhere, I drifted off for a moment.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“For both of us, it had simply been too enormous an experience. We shared it by not talking about it. Does this make any sense?”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“I'm not so weird to me.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“Have you ever had that feeling—that you’d like to go to a whole different place and become a whole different self?”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“To know one’s own state is not a simple matter. One cannot look directly at one’s own face with one’s own eyes, for example. One has no choice but to look at one’s reflection in the mirror. Through experience, we come to believe that the image is correct, but that is all.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“Hatred is like a long, dark shadow. Not even the person it falls upon knows where it comes from, in most cases. It is like a two-edged sword. When you cut the other person, you cut yourself. The more violently you hack at the other person, the more violently you hack at yourself. It can often be fatal. But it is not easy to dispose of. Please be careful, Mr.Okada. It is very dangerous. Once it has taken root in your heart, hatred is the most difficult think in the world to shake off.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
tags: hate
“Kumiko and I felt something for each other from the beginning. It was not one of those strong, impulsive feelings that can hit two people like an electric shock when they first meet, but something quieter and gentler, like two tiny lights traveling in tandem through a vast darkness and drawing imperceptibly closer to each other as they go. As our meetings grew more frequent, I felt not so much that I had met someone new as that I had chanced upon a dear old friend.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“I'd be smiling and chatting away, and my mind would be floating around somewhere else, like a balloon with a broken string.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“The point is, not to resist the flow. You go up when you're supposed to go up and down when you're supposed to go down. When you're supposed to go up, find the highest tower and climb to the top. When you're supposed to go down, find the deepest well and go down to the bottom. When there's no flow, stay still. If you resist the flow, everything dries up. If everything dries up, the world is darkness.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“It’s like when you put instant rice pudding mix in a bowl in the microwave and push the button, and you take the cover off when it rings, and there you’ve got ricing pudding. I mean, what happens in between the time when you push the switch and when the microwave rings? You can’t tell what’s going on under the cover. Maybe the instant rice pudding first turns into macaroni gratin in the darkness when nobody’s looking and only then turns back into rice pudding. We think it’s only natural to get rice pudding after we put rice pudding mix in the microwave and the bell rings, but to me, that is just a presumption. I would be kind of relieved if, every once in a while, after you put rice pudding mix in the microwave and it rang and you opened the top, you got macaroni gratin. I suppose I’d be shocked, of course, but I don’t know, I think I’d be kind of relieved too. Or at least I think I wouldn’t be so upset, because that would feel, in some ways, a whole lot more real.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“When you are used to the kind of life -of never getting anything you want- you stop knowing what it is you want.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“Holding this soft, small living creature in my lap this way, though, and seeing how it slept with complete trust in me, I felt a warm rush in my chest. I put my hand on the cat's chest and felt his heart beating. The pulse was faint and fast, but his heart, like mine, was ticking off the time allotted to his small body with all the restless earnestness of my own.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“Everybody's born with some different thing at the core of their existence. And that thing, whatever it is, becomes like a heat source that runs each person from the inside. I have one too, of course. Like everybody else. But sometimes it gets out of hand. It swells or shrinks inside me, and it shakes me up. What I'd really like to do is find a way to communicate that feeling to another person.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“Tell me, Doctor, are you afraid of death?"
"I guess it depends on how you die.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
tags: death
“Somewhere, far, far away, there's a shitty island. An island without a name. An island not worth giving a name. A shitty island with a shitty shape. On this shitty island grow palm trees that also have shitty shapes. And the palm trees produce coconuts that give off a shitty smell. Shitty monkeys live in the trees, and they love to eat these shitty-smelling coconuts, after which they shit the world's foulest shit. The shit falls on the ground and builds up shitty mounds, making the shitty palm trees that grown on them even shittier. It's an endless cycle.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“What we see before us is just one tiny part of the world. We get in the habit of thinking, this is the world, but that's not true at all. The real world is a much darker and deeper place than this, and much of it is occupied by jellyfish and things.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“I laughed. “You’re too young to be so … pessimistic,” I said, using the English word.
“Pessi-what?”
“Pessimistic. It means looking only at the dark side of things.”
“Pessimistic … pessimistic …” She repeated the English to herself over and over, and then she looked up at me with a fierce glare. “I’m only sixteen,” she said, “and I don’t know much about the world, but I do know one thing for sure. If I’m pessimistic, then the adults in this world who are not pessimistic are a bunch of idiots.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“You might think you made a new world or a new self, but your old self is always gonna be there, just below the surface, and if something happens, it'll stick its head out and say 'Hi.' You don't seem to realize that. You were made somewhere else.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“Between the end of that strange summer and the approach of winter, my life went on without change. Each day would dawn without incident and end as it had begun. It rained a lot in September. October had several warm, sweaty days. Aside from the weather, there was hardly anything to distinguish one day from the next. I worked at concentrating my attention on the real and useful. I would go to the pool almost every day for a long swim, take walks, make myself three meals.

But even so, every now and then I would feel a violent stab of loneliness. The very water I drank, the very air I breathed, would feel like long, sharp needles. The pages of a book in my hands would take on the threatening metallic gleam of razor blades. I could hear the roots of loneliness creeping through me when the world was hushed at four o'clock in the morning.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“I don't know -- maybe the world has two different kinds of people, and for one kind the world is this completely logical, rice pudding place, and for the other it's all hit-or-miss macaroni gratin.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“Results aside, the ability to have complete faith in another human being is one of the finest qualities a person can possess.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“I'm going to take you out of here ... I'm going to take you home, to the world where you belong, where cats with bent tails live, and there are little backyards, and alarm clocks ring in the morning.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
tags: love
“This person, this self, this me, finally, was made somewhere else. Everything had come from somewhere else, and it would all go somewhere else. I was nothing but a pathway for the person known as me.”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
“Nothing so consumes a person as meaningless exertion”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle

« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

All Quotes
Quotes By Haruki Murakami
Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game