The Man Who Knew Too Much Quotes

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The Man Who Knew Too Much The Man Who Knew Too Much by G.K. Chesterton
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The Man Who Knew Too Much Quotes (showing 1-30 of 36)
“Modern intelligence won't accept anything on authority. But it will accept anything without authority.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“You know I always liked you," said Fisher, quietly, "but I also respect you, which is not always the same thing. You may possibly guess that I like a good many people I don't respect. Perhaps it is my tragedy, perhaps it is my fault. But you are very different, and I promise you this: that I will never try to keep you as somebody to be liked, at the price of your not being respected.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“We’re all really dependent in nearly everything, and we all make a fuss about being independent in something.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“And when he became conscious of a human figure dark against the silver stream, sitting on a large boulder and looking rather like a large bird, it was perhaps with some of the premonitions proper to a man who meets the strangest friendship of his life.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“But it's my reading of human nature that a man will cheat in his trade, but not in his hobby.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“All his actions had something at once ambitious and conscientious; he drank no wine, but was slightly intoxicated with words. And his face and phrases were on the front page of all the newspapers just then, because he was contesting the safe seat of Sir Francis Verner in the great by-election in the west.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“the schoolboy had something of the stolid air of a young duke doing the grand tour, while his elderly relative was reduced to the position of a courier, who nevertheless had to pay for everything like a patron.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“Gentlemen used to lie just as schoolboys lie, because they hung together and partly to help one another out.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“The clubhouse on the golf links was”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“I've known a good many magicians myself in India—mango plant and all. But the Indian ones are all frauds, I'll swear.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“Hang it all! what is a man ashamed of nowadays?”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“Everything is different in the dark,”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“Nobody sees anything except in the dark," said the magician.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“Horne Fisher stooped and touched”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“He also knew a great deal about art, letters, philosophy, and general culture; about almost everything, indeed, except the world he was living in.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“Harold March was the sort of man who knows everything about politics, and nothing about politicians. He also knew a great deal about art, letters, philosophy, and general culture; about almost everything, indeed, except the world he was living in.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“Horne Fisher had in him something of the aristocrat, which is very near to the anarchist. It was characteristic of him that he turned into this dark and irregular entry as casually as into his own front door, merely thinking that it would be a short cut to the house. He made his way through the dim wood for some distance and with some difficulty, until there began to shine through the trees a level light, in lines of silver, which he did not at first understand. The next moment he had come out into the daylight at the top of a steep bank, at the bottom of which a path ran round the rim of a large ornamental lake.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“Do you know what that means?" he cried. "It means that God himself may hold a candle to show me your infernal face.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“Believe me, you never know the best about men till you know the worst about them.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“God alone knows what the conscience can survive, or how a man who has lost his honor will still try to save his soul.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“simultaneously”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“He was only one of those young men who cannot support the burden of consciousness unless they are doing something, and whose conceptions of doing something are limited to a game of some kind.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“Despite the almost aggressive touch of luxury in the fur coat, it soon became apparent that Sir Walter's large leonine head was for use as well as ornament, and he considered the matter soberly and sanely enough.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“I am the man who knows too much to know anything, or, at any rate, to do anything,”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“Perhaps it increased his annoyance that there was a certain unusual liveliness about the usually languid figure of Fisher. The ordinary image of him in March's mind was that of a pallid and bald-browed gentleman, who seemed to be prematurely old as well as prematurely bald. He was remembered as a man who expressed the opinions of a pessimist in the language of a lounger. Even now March could not be certain whether the change was merely a sort of masquerade of sunshine, or that effect of clear colors and clean-cut outlines that is always visible on the parade of a marine resort, relieved against the blue dado of the sea. But Fisher had a flower in his buttonhole, and his friend could have sworn he carried his cane with something almost like the swagger of a fighter. With such clouds gathering over England, the pessimist seemed to be the only man who carried his own sunshine.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“Something lay in the shadow at the foot of the ridge, as stiff as the stick of the fallen rocket; and the man who knew too much knew what is worth knowing.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“Modern intelligence won’t accept anything on authority. But it will accept anything without authority.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“You've got to understand one of the tricks of the modern mind, a tendency that most people obey without noticing it. In the village or suburb outside there's an inn with the sign of St. George and the Dragon. Now suppose I went about telling everybody that this was only a corruption of King George and the Dragoon. Scores of people would believe it, without any inquiry, from a vague feeling that it's probable because it's prosaic. It turns something romantic and legendary into something recent and ordinary. And that somehow makes it sound rational, though it is unsupported by reason. Of course some people would have the sense to remember having seen St. George in old Italian pictures and French romances, but a good many wouldn't think about it at all. They would just swallow the skepticism because it was skepticism. Modern intelligence won't accept anything on authority. But it will accept anything without authority. That's exactly what has happened here.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“We're all really dependent in nearly everything, and we all make a fuss about being independent in something.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much
“Splendid," replied the man by the well. But the first man pronounced the word as a young man might say it about a woman, and the second as an old man might say it about the weather, not without sincerity, but certainly without fervor.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Man Who Knew Too Much

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