Depression Quotes

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Depression: A Stubborn Darkness--Light for the Path Depression: A Stubborn Darkness--Light for the Path by Edward T. Welch
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Depression Quotes (showing 1-24 of 24)
“Through our struggles and pain, we are being offered perseverance, the character of God. Hardships are intended to give us a spiritual makeover, "that we may share in his holiness" (Heb. 12:10). Therefore, when God encourages us to persevere, he is not stumbling for encouraging words. He is teaching us how to look like him.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: A Stubborn Darkness--Light for the Path
“Somehow, turning to God and trusting him with the mysteries of suffering is the answer to the problem of suffering.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“The feeling of emptiness is usually a sign that we have put our trust in something that can’t sustain us. It reminds us that we were created to trust in our heavenly Father and nothing else. We were created to enjoy the many things God gives without making them the center of our lives. When we confuse the two, our lives feel out of kilter. To feel better, we try again and search for love apart from God, but when we finally realize that it is elusive, we forsake the quest and quietly despair. Keep probing. Life is ultimately about God.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“Scripture is about suffering. It has given comfort to millions. It has spawned hundreds of wonderful books that highlight God’s gentle care and Scripture’s probing insights. You can be assured of this: God really does speak in our suffering, and we have good reason to believe that the words he says are good and powerful enough to lighten our pain.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“Depression ... involves a complete absence: absence of affect, absence of feeling, absence of response, absence of interest. The pain you feel in the course of a major clinical depression is an attempt on nature’s part ... to fill up the empty space. But for all intents and purposes, the deeply depressed are just the walking, waking dead.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“There are more subtle ways we can contribute to depression too. For example, our misguided beliefs might lead us to think that we are beyond God’s love or forgiveness. We could be carrying fears of death and judgment or fears of the future because we have believed myths about both God and ourselves. These mistaken beliefs can actually cause depression. At the very least they can get pulled into depression’s gravitational field and end up as partners with depression that can intensify the experience.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“The reason Scripture doesn’t give clear guidelines for assigning responsibility is that it is not essential for us to know precise causes. This is good news: you don’t have to know the exact cause of suffering in order to find hope and comfort.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“God created you to trust him and love others. When you are not trusting or not loving, you are disconnected from your purpose, and hopelessness will thrive.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“You don’t really know who you are until you have gone through suffering. We can measure our spiritual growth by the way we behave under pressure.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“Notice how those who have medicated away their hardships with illegal drugs, alcohol, or sex can seem immature. They may look forty-five, but they have the character of an adolescent. Find a person who has weathered storms rather than avoided them and you will find someone who is wise.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“People who have experienced war have learned to accept the trials and sufferings of life. Among many wise, older citizens in American society, there is no desperate flight from suffering. Instead, there is a recognition that it is a part of life that can have some benefit. Yet among those in the post-World War II generation, a wisp of happiness is the goal, and suffering must be avoided at all costs. If there are hardships in a relationship, end it. If there is an unpleasant emotion, medicate it. It is a generation that perceives no value to any hardship. Like a pampered child who never experienced the regular storms of life, we lack the skill of growing through our trials.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“Some hopeless people who anticipate only death cite Scripture that says “I desire to depart and be with Christ” (Phil. 1:23). But Christ is not what hopeless people really want. The God-talk is misleading. The goal of hopelessness is to end the suffering, and if God happens to be there when it happens, fine. But God’s presence is not essential.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“Hope will only grow in the ground of humility.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“It is only fair to add that you should be undecided about spiritual causes too. By this I mean that you can’t immediately say that there is one core sin that has caused your depression. Some people race toward this explanation; they hope that once they discover that sin, everything will change. Others run from this perspective; they think spiritual explanations are prehistoric and misguided. The truth is in the middle of these two poles. Sin can certainly be a cause of depression, but you must be careful about connecting the dots between the two. If you are being honest, you will always find sin in your life. Everyone does. That doesn’t mean that sin caused your depression.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“Even if medication relieves some of the burden of depression, it may be functioning like aspirin. That is, it takes away some of the symptoms but the root problems persist.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“James intentionally enlarges the scope of suffering when he writes, “trials of many kinds.” By doing this, he invites those who experience depression to learn that, whatever the cause, depression will test our faith and serve as a catalyst for growth rather than a reason for despair. Yes, depression is spiritual in the same way that all suffering brings us face-to-face with critical spiritual realities.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“The details of how faith works in spiritual warfare are well known but easily forgotten.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“When we first listen to depression, we find that the misery is consuming. It doesn’t point anywhere or say anything. It just is. But when we keep listening, it tells stories of loss, rejection, or other events that happened to the person. It speaks of identifiable physiological problems. It points to a culture of irony: the culture with the most peace, money, and leisure is also the one with the most malignant sadness.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“Since ancient times, people have bowed down to idols in the appearance of humility and contrition. But their goal wasn’t to be mastered by the idol. People worship to get things. We choose idols in part because we believe that they will give us what we want. The god of drugs brings fearlessness; the god of sex promises pleasure and intimacy; the god of wealth holds out power and influence. We can feel miserable about ourselves because we want to be great, at least at something, and we are not feeling very great. Like the prophets of Baal, we are arrogant enough to believe that we can manipulate the idol—whether by cutting or some other form of works righteousness—so it will relent and give us what we want.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“Part of the depressive syndrome is that you are immensely loyal to your interpretation of yourself and your world. If God says you are forgiven in Christ, you create new rules that mandate contrition, penance, and self-loathing. If God says he loves you, you insist it is impossible. There it is: your system is higher than God’s.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“Love breaks the hold of individualism; it builds new communities out of the ashes of broken and fragmented relationships.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“Depressed people avoid people and church commitments, but they can also complain about abject isolation. The answer is to humbly accept your purpose. “Let us not give up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing, but let us encourage one another—and all the more as you see the Day approaching” (Heb. 10:25). Churches are not perfect. How could they be when we are the church? But the Spirit is with the gathering of his people. Church is where you will know more of God’s grace.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“Faith feels many different ways. It can be buoyant; it can be depressed and lifeless. Feelings don’t define faith. Instead, faith is simply turning to the Lord.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness
“Think about the nature of depression. Life is turned inward. You already have a sense that, for all practical purposes, God is not present. Add to that your relentless condemnation and pervasive self-criticism, which have persuaded you that God doesn’t love you. You couldn’t be a more obvious spiritual target if you painted a bull’s-eye on your chest.”
Edward T. Welch, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness

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