The Nazi Officer's Wife Quotes

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The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived the Holocaust The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived the Holocaust by Edith Hahn Beer
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The Nazi Officer's Wife Quotes (showing 1-30 of 30)
“During that long terrible ride to Munich, I finally swallowed the bitter pill of my lover's rejection and poisoned myself with it. I murdered the personality I was born with and transformed myself from a butterfly back in into a caterpillar. That night I learned to seek the shadows, to prefer silence”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived the Holocaust
“I thought: Now I am like Dante. I walk through hell, but I am not burning.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived the Holocaust
“The soul withdrew to a rational silence. The body remained there in the madness.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived the Holocaust
“A holiday place, this Munich, with high spirits and happy people. I thought: Now I am like Dante, I walk through hell, but I am not burning.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived the Holocaust
“Something always happened, you see. A Yiddish song on Hanukkah, a British rabbi's prayer on the radio, some kindness on a train or in the street that reminded me, no matter how far I retreated, no matter how deep into self-denial my fear drove me, that the Jews would always be my people and I would always belong to them.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived the Holocaust
“That's all it takes, you see -- a moment of kindness. Someone who is sweet and understanding, who seems to be sent there like an angel on the road to get you through the nightmare.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived the Holocaust
“But I think that every time you hurt somebody you care for, a crack appears in your relationship, a little weakening - and it stays there, dangerous, waiting for the next opportunity to open up and destroy everything.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived the Holocaust
“What about Adolf Hitler?"
"Oh, him. He's not a thinker. He's just a ranter and raver."
"There may come a time," said Pepi, "when people cannot tell the difference.”
Susan Dworkin, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived the Holocaust
“the fanciful insignia of the guild painted on the ceiling above the dining area. The forest in autumn was like heaven. So many things about Germany were like that: beautiful settings, bizarre behavior. I did not become close to the other women working at the Red Cross. I kept to myself and did what was necessary. I said “Good morning” and “Good evening.” In the morning, real nurses taught us the rudiments of anatomy and instructed us in the preparation”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“Man is a greater thing than you have thought him,”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“I think that every time you hurt somebody you care for, a crack appears in your relationship, a little weakening—and it stays there, dangerous, waiting for the next opportunity to open up and destroy everything.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“When an idea is idiotic to begin with, its applications never make any sense.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“breathed the air of freedom. My disguise became history.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“my father, who had dropped dead while working, had not really worked for our pleasant flat—the”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“In these German facilities alone, one million seven hundred fifteen thousand Jews were murdered from April 15, 1942, up until April 15, 1944.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“The city people call us shit farmers,” Otto sneered, “but now”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“idea is idiotic to begin with, its applications never make any sense.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“Alex Robichek had survived their Italian exile; that Uncle Richard and Aunt Roszi were safe in Sacramento.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“You see, even the inhuman ones were not always inhuman. This was a lesson that I would learn again and again—how completely unpredictable individuals could be when it came to personal morality.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“It was the individuals who made their own rules in this situation. No one forced them to behave in an unkind manner. The opportunity to act decently toward us was always available to them. Only the tiniest number of them ever used it.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“That’s all it takes, you see—a moment of kindness. Someone who is sweet and understanding, who seems to be sent there like an angel on the road to get you through the nightmare. Veronica.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“They never fought. I mean it: they never fought. In the evening, she did her sewing and he read his paper and we did our homework and we had what the Israelis call shalom bait, peace in the home.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“Now I am like Dante. I walk through hell, but I am not burning.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“She brought forth a piece of wood into which she had burned a French saying which our friend Franz had used to cheer us, in Osterburg: La vie est belle, et elle commence demain. “Life is beautiful, and it begins tomorrow.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“Cowardly thoughts, anxious hesitation, Womanish timidity, timorous complaints Won’t keep misery away from you And will not set you free.”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust
“colluded with German communists to build a secret radio and send messages to the Allies. In addition to his endless work week, Werner also had”
Edith Hahn Beer, The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust

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