Down and Out in Paris and London Quotes

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Down and Out in Paris and London Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell
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Down and Out in Paris and London Quotes (showing 1-30 of 47)
“It is a feeling of relief, almost of pleasure, at knowing yourself at last genuinely down and out. You have talked so often of going to the dogs - and well, here are the dogs, and you have reached them, and you can stand it. It takes off a lot of anxiety.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“It is curious how people take it for granted that they have a right to preach at you and pray over you as soon as your income falls below a certain level.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“People are wrong when they think that an unemployed man only worries about losing his wages; on the contrary, an illiterate man, with the work habit in his bones, needs work even more than he needs money. An educated man can put up with enforced idleness, which is one of the worst evils of poverty. But a man like Paddy, with no means of filling up time, is as miserable out of work as a dog on the chain. That is why it is such nonsense to pretend that those who have 'come down in the world' are to be pitied above all others.
The man who really merits pity is the man who has been down from the start,
and faces poverty with a blank, resourceless mind.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“If you set yourself to it, you can live the same life, rich or poor. You can keep on with your books and your ideas. You just got to say to yourself, "I'm a free man in here" - he tapped his forehead - "and you're all right.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“It is worth saying something about the social position of beggars, for when one has consorted with them, and found that they are ordinary human beings, one cannot help being struck by the curious attitude that society takes towards them. People seem to feel that there is some essential difference between beggars and ordinary 'working' men. They are a race apart--outcasts, like criminals and prostitutes. Working men 'work', beggars do not 'work'; they are parasites, worthless in their very nature. It is taken for granted that a beggar does not 'earn' his living, as a bricklayer or a literary critic 'earns' his. He is a mere social excrescence, tolerated because we live in a humane age, but essentially despicable.

Yet if one looks closely one sees that there is no ESSENTIAL difference between a beggar's livelihood and that of numberless respectable people. Beggars do not work, it is said; but, then, what is WORK? A navvy works by swinging a pick. An accountant works by adding up figures. A beggar works by standing out of doors in all weathers and getting varicose veins, chronic bronchitis, etc. It is a trade like any other; quite useless, of course--but, then, many reputable trades are quite useless. And as a social type a beggar compares well with scores of others. He is honest compared with the sellers of most patent medicines, high-minded compared with a Sunday newspaper proprietor, amiable compared with a hire-purchase tout--in short, a parasite, but a fairly harmless parasite. He seldom extracts more than a bare living from the community, and, what should justify him according to our ethical ideas, he pays for it over and over in suffering. I do not think there is anything about a beggar that sets him in a different class from other people, or gives most modern men the right to despise him.

Then the question arises, Why are beggars despised?--for they are despised, universally. I believe it is for the simple reason that they fail to earn a decent living. In practice nobody cares whether work is useful or useless, productive or parasitic; the sole thing demanded is that it shall be profitable. In all the modem talk about energy, efficiency, social service and the rest of it, what meaning is there except 'Get money, get it legally, and get a lot of it'? Money has become the grand test of virtue. By this test beggars fail, and for this they are despised. If one could earn even ten pounds a week at begging, it would become a respectable profession immediately. A beggar, looked at realistically, is simply a businessman, getting his living, like other businessmen, in the way that comes to hand. He has not, more than most modem people, sold his honour; he has merely made the mistake of choosing a trade at which it is impossible to grow rich.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“He was an embittered atheist (the sort of atheist who does not so much disbelieve in God as personally dislike Him), and took a sort of pleasure in thinking that human affairs would never improve.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“The stars are a free show; it don’t cost anything to use your eyes”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“Fear of the mob is a superstitious fear. It is based on the idea that there is some mysterious, fundamental difference between rich and poor, as though they were two different races, like Negroes and white men. But in reality there is no such difference. The mass of the rich and the poor are differentiated by their incomes and nothing else, and the average millionaire is only the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit. Change places, and handy dandy, which is the justice, which is the thief? Everyone who has mixed on equal terms with the poor knows this quite well. But the trouble is that intelligent, cultivated people, the very people who might be expected to have liberal opinions, never do mix with the poor. For what do the majority of educated people know about poverty?”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“A plongeur is a slave, and a wasted slave, doing stupid and largely unnecessary work. He is kept at work, ultimately, because of a vague feeling that he would be dangerous if he had leisure. And educated people, who should be on his side, acquiesce in the process, because they know nothing about him and consequently are afraid of him.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“Within certain limits, it is actually true that the less money you have, the less you worry.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“It is fatal to look hungry. It makes people want to kick you.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“The mass of the rich and the poor are differentiated by their incomes and nothing else,and the average millionaire is only the average dishwasher dressed in a new suit.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“The Paris slums are a gathering-place for eccentric people - people who have fallen into solitary, half-mad grooves of life and given up trying to be normal or decent. Poverty frees them from ordinary standards of behavior, just as money frees people from work.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“I have tipped waiters, and I have been tipped by waiters.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“The moral is, never be sorry for a waiter. Sometimes when you sit in a restaurant, still stuffing yourself half an hour after closing time, you feel that the tired waiter at your side must surely be despising you. But he is not. He is not thinking as he looks at you, 'What an overfed lout'; he is thinking, 'One day, when I have saved enough money, I shall be able to imitate that man.' He is ministering to a kind of pleasure he thoroughly understands and admires. And that is why waiters are seldom Socialists, have no effective trade union, and will work twelve hours a day--they work fifteen hours, seven days a week, in many cafés. They are snobs, and they find the servile nature of their work rather congenial.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“In all the modern talk about energy, efficiency, social service and the rest of it, what meaning is there except "Get money, get it legally, and get a lot of it"? Money has become the grand test of virtue.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“Poverty frees them from ordinary standards of behaviour, just as money frees people from work.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“ Trust a snake before a Jew and a Jew before a Greek,but don't trust an Armenian ”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“Money has become the grand test of virtue. By this test beggars fail, and for this they are despised. If one could earn even ten pounds a week at begging, it would become a respectable profession immediately. A beggar, looked at realistically, is simply a businessman, getting his living, like other businessmen, in the way that comes to hand. He has not, more than most modem people, sold his honour; he has merely made the mistake of choosing a trade at which it is impossible to grow rich.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“The educated man pictures a horde of submen, wanting only a day's liberty to loot his house, burn his books, and set him to work minding a machine or sweeping out a lavatory. 'Anything,' he thinks, 'any injustice, sooner than let that mob loose.' He does not see that since there is no difference between the mass of rich and poor, there is no question of setting the mob loose. The mob is in fact loose now, and--in the shape of rich men--is using its power to set up enormous treadmills of boredom, such as 'smart' hotels.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“In practice nobody cares if work is useful or useless, productive or parasitic; the sole thing demanded is that it shall be profitable. In all the modern talk about energy, efficiency, social service and the rest of it, what meaning is there except " Get money, get it legally, and get a lot of it"? Money has become the grand test of virtue. By this test beggars fail, and for this they are despised.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“We know that poverty is unpleasant; in fact, since it is so remote, we rather enjoy harrowing ourselves with the thought of its unpleasantness. But don't expect us to do anything about it. We are sorry for you lower classes, just as we are sorry for a, cat with the mange, but we will fight like devils against any improvement of your condition. We feel that you are much safer as you are. The present state of affairs suits us, and we are not going to take the risk of setting you free, even by an extra hour a day. So, dear brothers, since evidently you must sweat to pay for our trips to Italy, sweat and be damned to you.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“The Rue du Coq d'Or, Paris, seven in the morning.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“Dirt is a great respecter of persons; it lets you alone when you are well dressed, but as soon as your collar is gone it flies towards you from all directions.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“the strange thing is that when a word is well established as a swear word, it seems to lose its original meaning; that is, it loses the thing that made it into a swear word. A word becomes an oath because it means a certain thing, and, because it has become an oath, it ceases to mean that thing.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“And there is another feeling that is a great consolation in poverty. I believe everyone who has been hard up has experienced it. It is a feeling of relief, almost of pleasure, at knowing yourself at last genuinely down and out. You have talked so often of going to the dogs — and well, here are the dogs, and you have reached them, and you can stand it.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“The food we were given was no more than eatable, but the patron was not mean about drink; he allowed us two litres of wine a day each, knowing that if a plongeur is not given two litres he will steal three.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“Mengapa pengemis direndahkan? Aku yakin alasannya sangat sederhana, yaitu karena mereka gagal hidup layak. Dalam prakteknya, orang tidak peduli apakah suatu pekerjaan itu berguna atau tidak, produktif atau bersifat parasit; satu-satunya hal yang penting adalah bahwa pekerjaan itu harus menguntungkan. Dalam semua perbincangan modern tentang efisiensi, pelayanan sosial dan lain-lain, adakah makna lain selain 'Dapatkan uang, bikin jadi legal, dan dapatkan banyak-banyak'? Uang sudah menjadi alat ukur utama moralitas. Dengan ukuran ini pengemis gagal, dan karenanya mereka direndahkan. Kalau orang bisa berpendapatan sepuluh pound seminggu sebagai pengemis, profesi ini akan segera menduduki posisi terhormat. Seorang pengemis, dilihat secara realistis, adalah sekedar seorang pengusaha yang mencoba bertahan hidup, seperti halnya pengusaha lain, dengan cara menggunakan tangannya. Dia tidak pernah menjual kehormatannya, lebih dari kebanyakan orang modern; dia hanya berbuat kesalahan dengan memilih usaha yang tidak memberinya kemungkinan untuk jadi kaya (hal. 268)”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“المرء الذي يتقبل الإحسان يكره المحسن عادة .”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London
“Seorang buruh adalah salah satu budak dalam dunia modern. Tidak berarti kita perlu meratapinya, karena dia adalah pekerja lebih ahli dibandingkan banyak pekerja manual, namun tetap saja, dia tidak lebih bebas dari pada budak yang diperjual belikan. Pekerjaannya kasar dan tanpa cita rasa seni, ia dibayar hanya cukup untuk bertahan hidup. Dia tidak mungkin menikah, atau kalaupun dia menikah istrinya harus bekerja juga. Ia tak bisa keluar dari kehidupannya, tetap terpenjara, kecuali ada keberuntungan. Kita tidak bisa mengatakan bahwa itu hanya karena mereka bodoh. Mereka hanya terjebak dalam rutinitas yang tidak memberi kesempatan untuk berpikir. Kalau para budak punya kesempatan untuk berpikir, sudah sejak lama mereka akan membentuk organisasi dan berdemonstrasi menuntut perlakukan yang lebih baik. Tapi mereka tidak berpikir, karena mereka tidak memiliki kemewahan untuk itu, kehidupan telah memperbudak mereka.”
George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London

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