A Collection of Essays Quotes

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A Collection of Essays A Collection of Essays by George Orwell
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A Collection of Essays Quotes (showing 1-11 of 11)
“In our time, political speech and writing are largely the defense of the indefensible. Things like the continuance of British rule in India, the Russian purges and deportations, the dropping of atom bombs on Japan, can indeed be defended, but only by arguments which are too brutal for most people to face, and which do not square with the professed aims of political parties. Thus political language has to consist largely of euphemism, question-begging and sheer cloudy vagueness. Defenseless villages are bombarded from the air, the inhabitants driven out into the countryside, the cattle machine-gunned, the huts set on fire with incendiary bullets: this is called pacification. Millions of peasants are robbed of their farms and sent trudging along the roads with no more than they can carry: this is called transfer of population or rectification of frontiers. People are imprisoned for years without trial, or shot in the back of the neck or sent to die of scurvy in Arctic lumber camps: this is called elimination of unreliable elements.”
George Orwell, A Collection of Essays
“There are books that one reads over and over again, books that become part of the furniture of one’s mind and alter one’s whole attitude to life, books that one dips into but never reads through, books that one reads at a single sitting and forgets a week later:”
George Orwell, A Collection of Essays
tags: books
“...men can only be highly civilized while other men, inevitably less civilized, are there to guard and feed them.”
George Orwell, A Collection of Essays
“The truth, it is felt, becomes untruth when your enemy utters it.”
George Orwell, A Collection of Essays
“It is a strange fact, but it is unquestionably true, that almost any English intellectual would feel more ashamed of standing to attention during "God Save the King" than stealing from a poor box”
George Orwell, A Collection of Essays
“There were a few exotics among them—some South American boys, sons of Argentine beef barons, one or two Russians, and even a Siamese prince, or someone who was described as a prince. Sim had two great ambitions. One was to attract titled boys to the school, and the other was to train up pupils to win scholarships at public schools, above all Eton. He did, towards the end of my time, succeed in getting hold of two boys with real English titles. One of them, I remember, was a wretched little creature, almost an albino, peering upwards out of weak eyes, with a long nose at the end of which a dew drop always seemed to be trembling. Sam always gave these boys their titles when mentioning them”
George Orwell, A Collection of Essays
“home. One only had a hot bath once a week, for instance. The food was not only bad, it was also insufficient. Never before or since have I seen butter or jam scraped on bread so thinly. I do not think I can be imagining the fact that we were underfed, when I remember the lengths we would go in order to steal food. On a number of occasions I remember”
George Orwell, A Collection of Essays
“I HAD learned early in my career that one can do wrong against one's will, and before long I also learned that one can do wrong without ever discovering what one has done or why it was wrong. There were sins that were too subtle to be explained, and there were others that”
George Orwell, A Collection of Essays
“(This Side Idolatry), but it was a merely personal attack, concerned for the most part with Dickens's treatment of his wife. It dealt with incidents which not one in a thousand of Dickens's readers would ever hear about, and which no more invalidate his work than the second-best bed invalidates Hamlet. All that the book really demonstrated was that a writer's literary personality has little”
George Orwell, A Collection of Essays
“and he disapproved of this strain in Dickens and wished it were not there, but it never occurred to him to deny it. In Oliver Twist, Hard Times, Bleak House, Little Dorrit, Dickens attacked English institutions with a ferocity that has never since been approached. Yet he managed to do it without making himself hated, and, more than this, the very people he attacked have swallowed him so completely that he has become a national institution himself. In its attitude towards Dickens the English public has always been a little”
George Orwell, A Collection of Essays
“El robo a mano armada que suponen los libros es sencillamente una estafa de lo más cínica. Z escribe un libro que publica Y, y que reseña X en el «Semanario W». Si la reseña es negativa, Y retirará el anuncio que ha incluido, por lo cual X tiene que calificar la novela de “obra maestra inolvidable” si no quiere que lo despidan. En esencia, esta es la situación, y la reseña de novelas, o la crítica de novelas, si se quiere, se ha hundido a la profundidad a la que hoy se encuentra sobre todo porque los críticos, sin excepción, tienen a un editor o a varios apretándoles las tuercas por persona interpuesta".”
George Orwell, A Collection of Essays

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