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Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster by Jon Krakauer
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Into Thin Air Quotes (showing 1-24 of 24)
“There is a dark side to religious devotion that is too often ignored or denied. As a means of motivating people to be cruel or inhumane, there may be no more potent force than religion. When the subject of religiously inspired bloodshed comes up, many Americans immediately think of Islamic fundamentalism, which is to be expected in the wake of 911. But men have been committing heinous acts in the name of God ever since mankind began believing in deities, and extremists exist within all religions. Muhammad is not the only prophet whose words have been used to sanction barbarism; history has not lacked for Christians, Jews, Hindus, Sikhs, and even Buddhists who have been motivated by scripture to butcher innocents. Plenty of these religious extremist have been homegrown, corn-fed Americans.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“Getting to the top of any given mountain was considered much less important than how one got there: prestige was earned by tackling the most unforgiving routes with minimal equipment, in the boldest style imaginable.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“It was titillating to brush up against the enigma of mortality, to steal a glimpse across its forbidden frontier. Climbing was a magnificient activity, I firmly believed, not in spite of the inherent perils, but precisely because of them.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“Above the comforts of Base Camp, the expedition in fact became an almost Calvinistic undertaking. The ratio of misery to pleasure was greater by an order of magnitude than any mountain I'd been on; I quickly came to understand that climbing Everest was primarily about enduring pain. And in subjecting ourselves to week after week of toil, tedium and suffering, it struck me that most of us were probably seeking above all else, something like a state of grace.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“If you're bumming out, you're not gonna get to the top, so as long as we're up here we might as well make a point of grooving. (Quoting Scott Fischer)”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“Everest has always been a magnet for kooks, publicity seekers, hopeless romantics and others with a shaky hold on reality.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“This forms the nub of a dilemna that every Everest climber eventually comes up against: in order to succeed you must be exceedingly driven, but if you're too driven you're likely to die.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“With enough determination, any bloody idiot can get up this hill,” Hall observed. “The trick is to get back down alive.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air
“We were too tired to help. Above 8,000 meters is not a place where people can afford morality”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“It seems more than a little patronizing for Westerners to lament the loss of the good old days when life in the Khumbu was so much simpler and more picturesque. Most of the people who live in this rugged country seem to have no desire to be severed from the modern world or the untidy flow of human progress. The last thing Sherpas want is to be preserved as specimens in an anthropological museum.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“Thus the slopes of Everest are littered with corpses.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“...I quickly came to understand that climbing Everest was primarily about enduring pain. And in subjecting ourselves to week after week of toil, tedium, and suffering, it struck me that most of use were probably seeking, above else, something like a state of grace.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“But at times I wondered if I had not come a long way only to find that what I really sought was something I had left behind.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air
“Beidleman knew they were on the eastern, Tibetan side of the Col and that the tents lay somewhere to the west. But to move in that direction it was necessary to walk directly upwind into the teeth of the storm. Wind-whipped granules of ice and snow struck the climbers’ faces with violent force, lacerating their eyes and making it impossible to see where they were going. “It was so difficult and painful,” Schoening explains, “that there was an inevitable tendency to bear off the wind, to keep angling away from it to the left, and that’s how we went wrong.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air
“There were many, many fine reasons not to go, but attempting to climb Everest is an intrinsically irrational act—a triumph of desire over sensibility. Any person who would seriously consider it is almost by definition beyond the sway of reasoned argument.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air
“Achieving the summit of a mountain was tangible, immutable, concrete. The incumbent hazards lent the activity a seriousness of purpose that was sorely missing from the rest of my life. I thrilled in the fresh perspective that came from the tipping the ordinary plane of existence on end.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“If you get killed,” she argued with a mix of despair and anger, “it’s not just you who’ll pay the price. I’ll have to pay, too, you know, for the rest of my life. Doesn’t that matter to you?”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air
“Beidleman knew they were on the eastern, Tibetan side of the Col and that the tents lay somewhere to the west. But to move in that direction it was necessary to walk directly upwind into the teeth of the storm. Wind-whipped granules of ice and snow struck the climbers’ faces with violent force, lacerating their eyes and making it impossible to see where they were going. “It was so difficult and painful,” Schoening explains, “that there was an inevitable tendency to bear off the wind, to keep angling away from it to the left, and that’s how we went wrong. “At times you couldn’t even see”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air
“My hunger to climb had been blunted, in short, by a bunch of small satisfactions that added up to something like happiness.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“We tell ourselves stories in order to live.… We look for the sermon in the suicide, for the social or moral lesson in the murder of five. We interpret what we see, select the most workable of the multiple choices. We live entirely, especially if we are writers, by the imposition of a narrative line upon disparate images, by the “ideas” with which we have learned to freeze the shifting phantasmagoria which is our actual experience.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air
“Several authors and editors I respect counseled me not to write the book as quickly as I did; they urged me to wait two or three years and put some distance between me and the expedition in order to gain some crucial perspective. Their advice was sound, but in the end I ignored it - mostly because what happened on the mountain was gnawing my guts out. I thought that writing the book might purge Everest from my life. It hasn't, of course.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“La 18.20, Cotter l-a contactat pe Hall si i-a spus ca Jan Arnold sunase din Christchurch si astepta sa i se faca legatura.
- Imediat, a spus Rob.Am gura uscata. Vreau sa inghit niste zapada inainte sa vorbesc cu ea.
A revenit putin mai tarziu si a spus incet, cu o voce sparta si foarte distorsionata:
- Buna, draga mea. Sper ca esti in pat si ca ti-e cald. Ce faci?
- Nu pot sa-ti spun cat ma gandesc la tine! a raspuns Arnold. Pari mult mai bine decat ma asteptam. Ti-e cald dragule?
- Avand in vedere altitudinea si imprejurimile, mi-e destul de bine, a spus Hall, facand tot posibilul sa nu o ingrijoreze.
- Cum iti sunt picioarele?
- Nu mi-am dat jos bocancii ca sa ma uit, dar cred ca am niste degeraturi.
- De-abia astept sa te fac bine dupa ce vii acasa, a spus Arnold. Sunt convinsa ca o sa fii salvat. Sa nu te simti singur. Iti trimit toate gandurile mele bune!
- Te iubesc. Somn usor, draga mea. Te rog sa nu-ti faci prea multe griji, i-a spus Hall sotiei sale inainte sa inchida.
Acestea au fost ultimele cuvinte pe care le-am auzit de la el.
(ultima convorbire dintre Rob Hall si sotia sa)”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster
“While tentbound high on Everest, Mallory and his companions would read aloud to one another from Hamlet and King Lear”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air
“In drum spre varf, Viesturs a trecut pe langa cadravele inghetate ale lui Fischer si Hall.
-Jean (sotia lui Fischer) si Jan(sotia lui Hall) m-au rugat sa le aduc obiecte personale, poveste rusinat Viesturs. Stiam ca Scott isi poarta verigheta atarnata la gat si voiam sa i-o duc lui Jeannie, dar n-am putut sa sap pe langa corpul lui neinsufletit. Pur si simplu nu am fost in stare.
In loc sa ia suvenire, la coborare Viesturs s-a asezat langa Fischer si a stat cateva minute singur cu el. "Hei, Scott, ce faci?" l-a intrebat Ed cu tristete pe prietenul lui. "Ce s-a intamplat?”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster

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