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Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss by Hope Edelman
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Motherless Daughters Quotes (showing 1-30 of 33)
“There is an emptiness inside of me -- a void that will never be filled. No one in your life will ever love you as your mother does. There is no love as pure, unconditional and strong as a mother's love. And I will never be loved that way again.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss
“When a daughter loses a mother, the intervals between grief responses lengthen over time, but her longing never disappears. It always hovers at the edge of her awareness, prepared to surface at any time, in any place, in the least expected ways.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss
“I truly believe that the death of my mother has made me the way I am today. I am a survivor, mentally strong, determined, stronwilled, self-reliant, and independent. I also keep most of my pain, anger and feelings inside. I refuse to be vulnerable to anyone, especially my husband. The only people who see that more emotional or softer side are my children. That too because of my mother.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss
“a mother's death also means the loss of the consistent, supportive family system that once supplied her with a secure home base, she then has to develop her self-confidence and self-esteem through alternate means. Without a mother or mother-figure to guide her, a daughter also has to piece together a female self-image of her own.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss
“There is an emptiness inside of me- a void that will never be filled. No one in your life will ever love you as your mother does. There is no love as pure, unconditional and strong as a mother's love. And I will never be loved that way again.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss
“When a mother dies, a daughter grieves. And then her life moves on. She does, thankfully, feel happiness again. But the missing her, the wanting her, the wishing she were still here—I will not lie to you, although you probably already know. That part never ends.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“The degree to which a surviving parent copes is the most important indicator of the child's long-term adaptation. Kids whose surviving parents are unable to function effectively in the parenting role show more anxiety and depression, as well as sleep and health problems, than those whose parents have a strong support network and solid inner resources to rely on.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss
“Someone did us all a grave injustice by implying that mourning has a distinct beginning, middle, and end.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“When one parent dies, the world is dramatically altered, absolutely, but you still have another one left. When that second parent dies, it’s the loss of all ties, and where does that leave you? You lose your history, your sense of connection to the past. You also lose the final buffer between you and death. Even if you’re an adult, it’s weird to be orphaned.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“Rachel Resnick's story of love lost and love sought cracks open the timeworn addiction narrative to release something raw, probing, brave, and redemptive. The courage it took to write this story is challenged only by the courage it must have taken to live it. I sit in awe of such unflinching honesty. LOVE JUNKIE is memoir at its very best.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss
“When a mother dies, a daughter’s mourning never completely ends.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“When a daughter loses a mother, the intervals between grief responses lengthen over time, but her longing never disappears. It always hovers at the edge of her awareness, ready to surface at any time, in any place, in the least expected ways. This isn’t pathological. It’s normal. It’s why you find yourself, at twenty-four, or thirty-five or forty-three, unwrapping a present or walking down an aisle or crossing a busy street, doubled over and missing your mother”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“I miss her when I can’t remember what works best on insect bites, and when nobody else cares how rude the receptionist at the doctor’s office was to me. Whether she actually would have flown in to act as baby nurse or mailed me cotton balls and calamine lotion if she were alive isn’t really the issue. It’s the fact that I can’t ask her for these things that makes me miss her all over again.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“When a daughter loses a mother, she learns early that human relationships are temporary, that terminations are beyond her control, and her feelings of basic trust and security are shattered. The result? A sense of inner fragility and overriding vulnerability. She discovers she’s not immune to unfortunate events, and the fear of subsequent similar losses may become a defining characteristic of her personality.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“My grief fills rooms. It takes up space and it sucks out the air. It leaves no room for anyone else. Grief and I are left alone a lot. We smoke cigarettes and we cry. We stare out the window at the Chrysler Building twinkling in the distance, and we trudge through the cavernous rooms of the apartment like miners aimlessly searching for a way out . . . Grief is possessive and doesn’t let me go anywhere without it. I drag my grief out to restaurants and bars, where we sit together sullenly in the corner, watching everyone carry on around us. I take grief shopping with me, and we troll up and down the aisles of the supermarket, both of us too empty to buy much. Grief takes showers with me, our tears mingling with the soapy water, and grief sleeps next to me, its warm embrace like a sedative keeping me under for long, unnecessary hours. Grief is a force and I am swept up in it.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“You’re driving in the car and you feel like your whole world has fallen apart. And people in the car beside you are laughing and carrying on. Their life is normal, and you think, ‘Goddamn it. What gives you the right to laugh?’ Because nothing has happened to them. You don’t understand how everything else can go on normally when your life will never be normal again. Ever.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“she loses not only her mother but also the encouragement and revalidation of the self she needs as well as the real sharing she would want to do with her mother at that time.” It”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“I knew without doubt that my mother’s death had irrevocably altered who I was and who I would become. When a parent dies young, explains Maxine Harris, PhD, in The Loss That Is Forever, children have a personal encounter with death that influences the way they see the world for the rest of their lives. “Some events are so big and so powerful that they cannot help but change everything they touch,” she writes. How could all my thoughts and feelings, then, not be traced back to the event that had created such a jagged fault line through my history, dividing it into a permanent Before and After?”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“it’s impossible to undo fifteen or twenty years of learned behavior with a mother in only a few months. If it takes nine months to bring a life into this world, what makes us think we can let go of someone in less?”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“When a mother dies too young, something inside her daughter always feels incomplete. There’s a missing piece she continues to look for, an emptiness she keeps trying to fill. The”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“Jane Smiley’s Pulitzer Prize–winning novel A Thousand Acres, reveals what can happen”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“Once they had physically separated from their families and achieved the psychological and emotional stability they needed to mourn without fear of abandonment or collapse, they could face their grief head-on. Our psyches seem to protect us until we’re able to confront the pain, and then the internal alarm clock rings, telling us it’s time to wake up and go to work.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“Experiencing that intense emotion is what helps us, ultimately, accept that our mothers are gone.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“never said, “I feel so sorry for you, you poor little thing.” Instead, she would ask, “What is this like for you?”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“Virginia Woolf, who was thirteen when her mother died, wrote, “Youth and death shed a halo through which it is difficult to see a real face.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“When my mother died, a lot of people tried to comfort me by saying, ‘Well, you still have your father. You still have a brother and sister. You have a wonderful husband and beautiful children.’ And you know what? That’s all true. That’s all completely true. But I still don’t have my mother.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“My mother, as a woman in her sixties, is mostly a mystery to me. In my mind, she’s an eternal forty-two, and as her daughter, I never get past seventeen. There”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“Somewhere in that hour I lost all relation to a middle ground, and I didn’t regain it for what became a very long time. In”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“many of my achievements have been bittersweet to me because they are things my mother once hoped to accomplish but never got the time to do. I’ve visited a dozen foreign countries. I went to my brother’s wedding. I saw the first day of a new century.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition
“there’s no good way to lose a loved one—just, in the words of one twenty-six-year-old woman, “different kinds of hell.”
Hope Edelman, Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss, 20th Anniversary Edition

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