The Art of Happiness Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
The Art of Happiness The Art of Happiness by Dalai Lama XIV
53,428 ratings, 4.13 average rating, 1,599 reviews
Open Preview
The Art of Happiness Quotes (showing 1-30 of 63)
“Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them, humanity cannot survive.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“Whether our action is wholesome or unwholesome depends on whether that action or deed arises from a disciplined or undisciplined state of mind. It is felt that a disciplined mind leads to happiness and an undisciplined mind leads to suffering, and in fact it is said that bringing about discipline within one's mind is the essence of the Buddha's teaching.
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“A disciplined mind leads to happiness, and an undisciplined mind leads to suffering.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“Although you may not always be able to avoid difficult situations,you can modify the extent to which you can suffer by how you choose to respond to the situation.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“We need to learn how to want what we have NOT to have what we want in order to get steady and stable Happiness”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“Sometimes when I meet old friends, it reminds me how quickly time passes. And it makes me wonder if we've utilized our time properly or not. Proper utilization of time is so important. While we have this body, and especially this amazing human brain, I think every minute is something precious. Our day-to-day existence is very much alive with hope, although there is no guarantee of our future. There is no guarantee that tomorrow at this time we will be here. But we are working for that purely on the basis of hope. So, we need to make the best use of our time. I believe that the proper utilization of time is this: if you can, serve other people, other sentient beings. If not, at least refrain from harming them. I think that is the whole basis of my philosophy.

So, let us reflect what is truly of value in life, what gives meaning to our lives, and set our priorities on the basis of that. The purpose of our life needs to be positive. We weren't born with the purpose of causing trouble, harming others. For our life to be of value, I think we must develop basic good human qualities—warmth, kindness, compassion. Then our life becomes meaningful and more peaceful—happier.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“Self satisfaction alone cannot determine if a desire or action is positive or negative. The demarcation between a positive and a negative desire or action is not whether it gives you a immediate feeling of satisfaction, but whether it ultimately results in positive or negative consequences.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“When life becomes too complicated and we feel overwhelmed, it’s often useful just to stand back and remind ourselves of our overall purpose, our overall goal. When faced with a feeling of stagnation and confusion, it may be helpful to take an hour, an afternoon, or even several days to simply reflect on what it is that will truly bring us happiness, and then reset our priorities on the basis of that. This can put our life back in proper context, allow a fresh perspective, and enable us to see which direction to take.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living
“No matter what activity or practice we are pursuing, there isn't anything that isn't made easier through constant familiarity and training. Through training, we can change; we can transform ourselves. Within Buddhist practice there are various methods of trying to sustain a calm mind when some disturbing event happens. Through repeated practice of these methods we can get to the point where some disturbance may occur but the negative effects on our mind remain on the surface, like the waves that may ripple on the surface of an ocean but don't have much effect deep down. And, although my own experience may be very little, I have found this to be true in my own small practice. So, if I receive some tragic news, at that moment I may experience some disturbance within my mind, but it goes very quickly. Or, I may become irritated and develop some anger, but again, it dissipates very quickly. There is no effect on the deeper mind. No hatred. This was achieved through gradual practice; it didn't happen overnight.'

Certainly not. The Dalai Lama has been engaged in training his mind since he was four years old.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“happiness is determined more by one's state of mind than by external events.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“Our attitude towards suffering becomes very important because it can affect how we cope with suffering when it arises.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“I think that if one is seeking to build a truly satisfying relationship, the best way of bringing this about is to get to know the deeper nature of the person and relate to her or him on that level, instead of merely on the basis of superficial characteristics.”
Howard C. Cutler Dalai Lama, The Art of Happiness
“In general, if we carefully examine any given situation in a very unbiased and honest way, we will realize that to a large extent we are also responsible for the unfolding of events.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“However, if we can transform our attitude towards suffering, adopt an attitude that allows us greater tolerance of it, then this can do much to help counteract feelings of mental unhappiness, dissatisfaction, and discontent.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“regret with dignity and grace.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living
“In accepting that suffering is a part of your daily existence, you could begin by examining the factors that normally give rise of feelings of discontent and mental unhappiness.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“Compassion can be roughly defined in terms of a state of mind that is nonviolent, nonharming, and nonaggressive. It is a mental attitude based on the wish for others to be free of their suffering and is associated with a sense of commitment, responsibility, and respect towards others.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living
“I think that in many cases people tend to expect the other person to respond to them in a positive way first, rather than taking the initiative themselves to create that possibility. I feel that's wrong, it leads to problems and can act as a barrier that just serves to promote a feeling of isolation from others.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“So let us reflect on what is truly of value in life, what gives meaning to our lives, and set our priorities on the basis of that. The purpose of our life needs to be positive. We weren't born with the purpose of causing trouble, harming others. For our life to be of value, I think we must develop basic good human qualities-warmth, kindness, compassion. Then our life becomes meaningful and more peaceful-happier.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“If you approach others with the thought of compassion, that will automatically reduce fear and allow an openness with other people. It creates a positive, friendly atmosphere. With that attitude, you can approach a relationship in which you, yourself, initially create the possibility of receiving affection or a positive response from the other person. And with that attitude, even if the other person is unfriendly or doesn't respond to you in a positive way, then at least you've approached the person with a feeling of openness that gives you a certain flexibility and the freedom to change your approach as needed.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“happiness is determined more by one’s state of mind than by external events.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living
“Rather, genuine compassion is based on the rationale that all human beings have an innate desire to be happy and overcome suffering, just like myself. And, just like myself, they have the natural right to fulfill this fundamental aspiration.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness
“If you want others to be happy practice compassion; and if you want yourself to be happy practice compassion.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living
“There is a Possibility of freedom from suffering. By removing the causes of suffering, it is possible to attain a state of Liberation, a state free from suffering. According to Buddhist thought, the root causes of suffering are ignorance, craving, and hatred. These are called the ‘three poisons of the mind.’These”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living
“Within all beings there is the seed of perfection. However, compassion is required in order to activate that seed which is inherent in our hearts and minds....”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living
“In identifying one’s mental state as the prime factor in achieving happiness, of course that doesn’t deny that our basic physical needs for food, clothing, and shelter must be met. But once these basic needs are met, the message is clear: we don’t need more money, we don’t need greater success or fame, we don’t need the perfect body or even the perfect mate—right now, at this very moment, we have a mind, which is all the basic equipment we need to achieve complete happiness.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living
“By mobilizing our thoughts and practicing new ways of thinking, we can reshape our nerve cells and change the way our brains work.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living
“happiness. For example, good”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness: A handbook for living
“The psychoanalyst and social philosopher Erich Fromm claimed that humankind’s most basic fear is the threat of being separated from other humans. He believed that the experience of separateness, first encountered in infancy, is the source of all anxiety in human life. John Bowlby agreed, citing a good deal of experimental evidence and research to support the idea that separation from one’s caregivers – usually the mother or father – during the latter part of the first year of life inevitably creates fear and sadness in babies. He feels that separation and interpersonal loss are at the very roots of the human experiences of fear, sadness, and sorrow.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living

« previous 1 3

All Quotes
Quotes By Dalai Lama XIV
Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game