Letters to Malcolm Quotes

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Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer by C.S. Lewis
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Letters to Malcolm Quotes (showing 1-30 of 43)
“Relying on God has to begin all over again every day as if nothing had yet been done.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
tags: god, rely
“Some people feel guilty about their anxieties and regard them as a defect of faith. I don't agree at all. They are afflictions, not sins. Like all afflictions, they are, if we can so take them, our share in the Passion of Christ”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“It is much easier to pray for a bore than to go visit him.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“We must lay before him what is in us; not what ought to be in us.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“Our struggle is--isn't it?--to achieve and retain faith on a lower level. To believe that there is a Listener at all. For as the situation grows more and more desperate, the grisly fears intrude. Are we only talking to ourselves in an empty universe? The silence is often so emphatic. And we have prayed so much already”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“For most of us the prayer in Gethsemane is the only model. Removing mountains can wait.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“Novelty may fix our attention not even on the service but on the celebrant. You know what I mean. Try as one may to exclude it, the question "What on earth is he up to now?" will intrude. It lays one's devotion waste. There is really some excuse for the man who said, "I wish they'd remember that the charge to Peter was Feed my sheep; not Try experiments on my rats, or even, Teach my performing dogs new tricks.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“This act [creation], as it is for God, must always remain totally inconceivable to man. For we--even our poets and musicians and inventors--never, in the ultimate sense make. We only build. We always have materials to build from. All we can know about the act of creation must be derived from what we can gather about the relation of the creatures to their Creator”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“A concentrated mind and a sitting body make for better prayer than a kneeling body and a mind half asleep.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“I haven't any language weak enough to depict the weakness of my spiritual life. If I weakened it enough it would cease to be language at all. As when you try to turn the gas-ring a little lower still, and it merely goes out.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“I hope I do not offend God by making my Communions in the frame of mind I have been describing. The command, after all, was Take, eat: not Take, understand.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“A man who first tried to guess 'what the public wants,' and then preached that as Christianity because the public wants it, would be a pretty mixture of fool and knave”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“I sometimes pray not for self-knowledge in general but for just so much self knowledge at the moment as I can bear and use at the moment; the little daily dose.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“... the very last thing I want to do is to unsettle in the mind of any Christian, whatever his denomination, the concepts -- for him traditional -- by which he finds it profitable to represent to himself what is happening when he receives the bread and wine. I could wish that no definitions had ever been felt to be necessary; and, still more, that none had been allowed to make divisions between churches.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“It is well to have specifically holy places, and things, and days, for, without these focal points or reminders, the belief that all is holy and "big with God" will soon dwindle into a mere sentiment. But if these holy places, things, and days cease to remind us, if they obliterate our awareness that all ground is holy and every bush (could we but perceive it) a Burning Bush, then the hallows begin to do harm.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“If grace perfects nature it must expand all our natures into the full richness of the diversity which God intended when He made them, and Heaven will display far more variety than Hell. . . a Greek Orthodox mass I once attended. . . seemed to [have] no prescribed behaviour for the congregation. . . the beauty was that nobody took notice of what anyone else was doing.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“Every service is a structure of acts and words through which we rceive a sacrament, or repent, or supplicate, or adore. And it enables us to do these things best--if you like, it 'works' best--when, through long familiarity, we don't have to think about it. As long as you notice, and have to count, the steps, you are not yet dancing but only learning to dance.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“Take care. It is so easy to break eggs without making omelettes.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“Discussions usually separate us; actions sometimes unite us.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“It is no use to ask God with factitious earnestness for A when our whole mind is in reality filled with the desire for B. We must lay before Him what is in us, not what ought to be in us.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“We had better share our bewilderments. By hiding them from each other we should not hide them from ourselves.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“To think of our prayers as just ‘causes’ would suggest that the whole importance of petitionary prayer lay in the achievement of the thing asked for. But really, for our spiritual life as a whole, the ‘being taken into account,’ or ‘considered,’ matters more than the being granted. Religious people don’t talk about the ‘results’ of prayer; they talk of its being ‘answered’ or ‘heard’.... We can bear to be refused but not to be ignored. In other words, our faith can survive many refusals if they really are refusals and not mere disregards. The apparent stone will be bread to us if we believe that a Father’s hand put it into ours, in mercy or in justice or even in rebuke.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“The perfect church service would be one we were almost unaware of; our attention would have been on God.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“For prayer is request. The essence of request, as distinct from compulsion, is that it may or may not be granted.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“If we are free to delete all inconvenient data we shall certainly have no theological difficulties; but for the same reason no solutions and no progress.... The troublesome fact, the apparent absurdity which can't be fitted into any synthesis we have yet made, is precisely the one we must not ignore.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“But the state of mind which desperate desire working on a strong imagination can manufacture is not faith in the Christian sense, it is a feat of psychological gymnastics.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“Some people feel guilty about their anxieties and regard them as a defect of faith. I don’t agree at all. They are afflictions, not sins.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“God sometimes seems to speak to us most intimately when He catches us, as it were, off our guard. Our preparations to receive Him sometimes have the opposite effect.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“Bad laws make hard cases.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
“I am therefore not really deeply worried by the fact that prayer is at present a duty, and even an irksome one. This is humiliating. It is frustrating. It is terribly time-wasting—the worse one is praying, the longer one’s prayers take. But we are still only at school. Or, like Donne, “I tune my instrument here at the door.”
C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer

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