A Literate Passion Quotes

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A Literate Passion: Letters of Anaïs Nin & Henry Miller, 1932-1953 A Literate Passion: Letters of Anaïs Nin & Henry Miller, 1932-1953 by Anaïs Nin
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A Literate Passion Quotes (showing 1-10 of 10)
“Anaïs, I don't know how to tell you what I feel. I live in perpetual expectancy. You come and the time slips away in a dream. It is only when you go that I realize completely your presence. And then it is too late. You numb me. [...] This is a little drunken, Anaïs. I am saying to myself "here is the first woman with whom I can be absolutely sincere." I remember your saying - "you could fool me, I wouldn't know it." When I walk along the boulevards and think of that. I can't fool you - and yet I would like to. I mean that I can never be absolutely loyal - it's not in me. I love women, or life, too much - which it is, I don't know. But laugh, Anaïs, I love to hear you laugh. You are the only woman who has a sense of gaiety, a wise tolerance - no more, you seem to urge me to betray you. I love you for that. [...]
I don't know what to expect of you, but it is something in the way of a miracle. I am going to demand everything of you - even the impossible, because you encourage it. You are really strong. I even like your deceit, your treachery. It seems aristocratic to me.”
Henry Miller, A Literate Passion: Letters of Anaïs Nin & Henry Miller, 1932-1953
tags: love
“I want to undress you, vulgarize you a bit.”
Henry Miller, A Literate Passion: Letters of Anaïs Nin & Henry Miller, 1932-1953
tags: sex
“When you surrender, the problem ceases to exist. Try to solve it,or conquer it, and you only set up more resistance. I am very certain now that, as I said therein, if I truly become what I wish to be, the burden will fall away. The most difficult thing to admit, and to realize with one’s whole being, is that you alone control nothing.”
Henry Miller, A Literate Passion: Letters of Anaïs Nin & Henry Miller, 1932-1953
“Before, as soon as I came home from all sorts of places I would sit down and write in my journal. Now I want to write you, talk with you... I love when you say all that happens is good, it is good. I say all that happens is wonderful. For me it is all symphonic, and I am so aroused by living - god, Henry, in you alone I have found the same swelling of enthusiasm, the same quick rising of the blood, the fullness... Before, I almost used to think there was something wrong. Everybody else seemed to have the brakes on... I never feel the brakes. I overflow. And when I feel your excitement about life flaring, next to mine, then it makes me dizzy.”
Anaïs Nin, A Literate Passion: Letters of Anaïs Nin & Henry Miller, 1932-1953
“It is true that I create over and over again the same difficulties for myself in order to struggle over and over again to master them [but] to continually struggle against the same problem and to continually fail to dominate it brings a feeling of frustration and a kind of paralysis. What is necessary to life, to livingness, is to move on, in other words to move from one kind of problem to another.”
Anaïs Nin, A Literate Passion: Letters of Anaïs Nin & Henry Miller, 1932-1953
“Things I forgot to tell you:

That I love you, and that when I awake in the morning I use my intelligence to discover more ways of appreciating you.

That when June comes back she will love you more because I have loved you. There are new leaves on the tip and climax of your already overrich head.

That I love you.
That I love you.
That I love you.

I have become an idiot like Gertrude Stein. That’s what love does to intelligent women. They cannot write letters anymore.”
Anaïs Nin, A Literate Passion: Letters of Anaïs Nin & Henry Miller, 1932-1953
tags: love
“Don't expect me to be sane anymore. Don't let's be sensible. It was a marriage at Louveciennes—you can't dispute it. I came away with pieces of you sticking to me; I am walking about, swimming, in an ocean of blood, your Andalusian blood, distilled and poisonous... I can't see how I can go on living away from you—these intermissions are death. How did it seem to you when Hugo came back? Was I still there? I can't picture you moving about with him as you did with me. Legs closed. Frailty. Sweet, treacherous acquiescence. Bird docility. You became a woman with me. I was almost terrified by it. You are not just thirty years old—you are a thousand years old.

Here I am back and still smouldering with passion, like wine smoking. Not a passion any longer for flesh, but a complete hunger for you, a devouring hunger.”
Henry Miller, A Literate Passion: Letters of Anaïs Nin & Henry Miller, 1932-1953
“That we cannot rise equal to situations when we are in them — that is the tragedy of life.”
Henry Miller, A Literate Passion: Letters of Anaïs Nin & Henry Miller, 1932-1953
“We're journeying constantly, but there is always a machine and books, and your body is always close to me and the look in your eyes never changes. People are saying we will be miserable, we will regret, but we are happy, we are laughing always, we are singing. We are talking Spanish and French and”
Anaïs Nin, A Literate Passion: Letters of Anais Nin & Henry Miller, 1932-1953
“I want to do things so wild with you that I don't know how to say them.”
Anaïs Nin, A Literate Passion: Letters of Anaïs Nin & Henry Miller, 1932-1953
tags: words

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