Leave It to Psmith Quotes

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Leave It to Psmith Leave It to Psmith by P.G. Wodehouse
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Leave It to Psmith Quotes (showing 1-11 of 11)
“We must always remember, however,' said Psmith gravely, 'that poets are also God's creatures.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Leave It to Psmith
“Liz," said Mr. Cootes, lost in admiration, "when it comes to doping out a scheme, you're the snake's eyebrows!”
P.G. Wodehouse, Leave It to Psmith
“Wait a minute while I think," said Miss Peavey.
There was a pause. Miss Peavey sat with knit brows.
"How would it be..." ventured Mr. Cootes.
"Cheese it!" said Miss Peavey.
Mr. Cootes cheesed it.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Leave It to Psmith
“A depressing musty scent pervaded the place, as if a cheese had recently died there in painful circumstances.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Leave It to Psmith
“But, Ed! Say! Are you going to let him get away with it?"
"Am I going to let him get away with it!" said Mr. Cootes, annoyed by the foolish question. "Wake me up in the night and ask me!"
"But what are you going to do?"
"Do!" said Mr. Cootes. "Do! I'll tell you what I'm going to..." He paused, and the stern resolve that shone in his face seemed to flicker. "Say, what the hell am I going do?" he went on somewhat weakly.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Leave It to Psmith
“He picked up one of the dead bats and covered it with his handkerchief. ‘Somebody’s mother,’ he murmured reverently.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Leave It to Psmith
“Love, Miss Halliday, is a delicate plant. It needs tending, nurturing, assiduous fostering. This cannot be done by throwing the breakfast bacon at a husband's head.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Leave It to Psmith
“It seems to me that you and I were made for each other. I am your best friend’s best friend and we both have a taste for stealing other people’s jewellery.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Leave It to Psmith
tags: love, theft
“One uses the verb ‘descend’ advisedly, for what is required is some word suggesting instantaneous activity. About Baxter’s progress from the second floor to the first there was nothing halting or hesitating. He, so to speak, did it now. Planting”
P.G. Wodehouse, Leave It to Psmith
“It is the opinion of most thoughtful students of life that happiness in this world depends chiefly on the ability to take things as they come. An instance of one who may be said to have perfected this attitude is to be found in the writings of a certain eminent Arabian author who tells of a traveller who, sinking to sleep one afternoon upon a patch of turf containing an acorn, discovered when he woke that the warmth of his body had caused the acorn to germinate and that he was now some sixty feet above the ground in the upper branches of a massive oak. Unable to descend, he faced the situation equably. ‘I cannot,’ he observed, ‘adapt circumstances to my will: therefore I shall adapt my will to circumstances. I decide to remain here.’ Which he did.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Leave It to Psmith
“Mere surprise, however, was never enough to prevent Psmith talking. He”
P.G. Wodehouse, Leave It to Psmith

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