Saving Fish from Drowning Quotes

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Saving Fish from Drowning Saving Fish from Drowning by Amy Tan
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Saving Fish from Drowning Quotes (showing 1-30 of 31)
“I hid my deepest feelings so well I forgot where I placed them.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“From what I have observed, when the anesthesia of love wears off, there is always the pain of consequences. You don't have to be stupid to marry the wrong man.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“You remember only what you want to remember. You know only what your heart allows you to know.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“A pious man explained to his followers: 'It is evil to take lives and noble to save them. Each day I pledge to save a hundred lives. I drop my net in the lake and scoop out a hundred fishes. I place the fishes on the bank, where they flop and twirl. "Don't be scared," I tell those fishes. "I am saving you from drowning." Soon enough, the fishes grow calm and lie still. Yet, sad to say, I am always too late. The fishes expire. And because it is evil to waste anything, I take those dead fishes to market and I sell them for a good price. With the money I receive, I buy more nets so I can save more fishes.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“You can't have intentions without consequences. The question is, who pays for the consequences? Saving fish from drowning. Same thing. Who’s saved? Who’s not?”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“Was there ever a true great love? Anyone who became the object of my obsession and not simply my affections? I honestly don't think so. In part, this was my fault. It was my nature, I suppose. I could not let myself be that unmindful. Isn't that what love is-losing your mind? You don't care what people think. You don't see your beloved's fault, the slight stinginess, the bit of carelessness, the occasional streak of meanness. You don't mind that he's beneath you socially, educationally, financially, and morally-that's the worst I think, deficient morals.

I always minded. I was always cautious of what could go wrong, what was already "not ideal". I paid attention to divorce rates. I ask you this: What's the chance of finding a lasting marriage? Twenty percent? Ten? Did I know any woman who escaped having her heart crushed like a recyclable can? Not a one. From what I have observed, when the anesthesia of love wears off, there is always the pain of consequences. You don't have to be stupid to marry the wrong man.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“I have loved works of fiction precisely for their illusions, for the author's sleight-of-hand in showing me the magic, what appeared in the right hand but not in the left...”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“With hope, a mind is always free.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“You don't care what people think. You don't see your beloved's faults, the slight stinginess, the bit of carelessness, the occasional streak of meanness. You don't mind that he is beneath you socially, educationally, financially, and morally--that's the worst, I think, deficient morals. (Saving Fish From Drowning)”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“While it is good to speak well, it is better to speak the truth.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“...As she grew older, she was aware of her changing position on mortality. In her youth, the topic of death was philosophical; in her thirties it was unbearable and in her forties unavoidable. In her fifties, she had dealt with it in more rational terms, arranging her last testament, itemizing assets and heirlooms, spelling out the organ donation, detailing the exact words for her living will. Now, in her sixties, she was back to being philosophical. Death was not a loss of life, but the culmination of a series of releases. It was devolving into less and less. You had to release yourself from vanity, desire, ambition, suffering, and frustration - all the accoutrements of the I, the ego. And if you die, you would disappear, leave no trace, evaporate into nothingness...”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“...A painting was a translation of the language of my heart.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“...A mother is the one who fills your heart in the first place. She teaches you the nature of happiness: what is the right amount, what is too much, and the kind that makes you want more of what is bad for you. A mother helps her baby flex her first feelings of pleasure. She teaches her when to later exercise restraint, or to take squealing joy in recognizing the fluttering leaves of the gingko tree, to sense a quieter but more profound satisfaction in chancing upon an everlasting pine. A mother enables you to realize that there are different levels of beauty and therein lie the sources of pleasure, some of which are popular and ordinary, and thus of brief value, and others of which are difficult and rare, and hence worth pursuing.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“A good government had to guide its people, sometimes gently, sometimes strictly, just as parents did. It could allow certain freedoms, but in a style that suited the country.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“I was greedy, she warned, and could not fill my heart with enough pleasure, my stomach with enough contentment, my body with enough sleep. I was like a rice basket with a rat hole at the bottom, and thus could not be satisfied and overflow, nor could I be filled. I would never know the full depth and breadth of love, beauty, or happiness. She said it like a curse.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“Was there ever a great true love? Anyone who became the object of my obsession and not simply my affections?...I could not let myself become that unmindful. Isn't that what love is - losing your mind? You don't care what people think. You don't see your beloved's faults, the slight stinginess, the bit of carelessness, the occasional streak of meanness. You don't mind that he is beneath you socially, educationally, financially, and morally - that's the worst, I think, deficient morals.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“The only thing certain in times of great uncertainty is that people will behave with great strength or weakness, and with very little else in between.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“Sólo recuerdas lo que quieres recordar. Sólo sabes lo que tu corazón te permite saber.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“bad, how likely is it to come”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“back as a mud-smashing”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“Look at that. There one family lives, kitchen is in China, bedroom is in Myanmar. In this way, this family eats in one country, sleeps in other. I think this house been standing there for many centuries, yes, long time, before anyone decided where one country stops, the other starts”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“My thinking is this: Her original mother, she did what she must. I, her in-between mother, I did what I must. That Japanese couple, they also did what they must. One day, this little girl will grow up, and she will be doing what she must. So you see, we all do what we must”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“When the anesthesia of love wears off,
you suffer the pain of consequence.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“just like my mother, and if I”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“Probably jet lag.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“All this talk of oblivion, of wanting nothing and becoming nobody, seems rather contradictory from a Buddhist sense. The Buddha did all this himself and he became so much a nobody that he became famous, the biggest nobody of them all. And he will never disappear, because fame has made him immortal. But I do admire him for his attitude and discipline. He was a good Indian son.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“Never show a weapon before you have to use it”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“I realized then that we miss so much of life while we are part of it. We fail to see ninety percent of the glories of nature, for to do so would require vision that is simultaneously telescopic and microscopic.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“And before they ate the last supper of life-ending mushrooms, they would pound the drums and sound the hours. They would ready the souls of their bodies, the soul of the eyes, the soul of the mouths, all of them, one by one. They would know to be ready, to not dillydally and get left behind. Soon the soldiers would arrive. They would stab them with their bayonets, shoot them with their rifles, but they would already be gone, their bodies empty like the hollow husks of the emeralds beetles.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning
“I hid my deepest feelings so well I forgot where I had placed them.”
Amy Tan, Saving Fish from Drowning

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