Anila’s Reviews > A Game of Thrones > Status Update

Anila
Anila is on page 190 of 835
1. Crows and ravens do not make human-like noises. You're confusing them with parrots. 2. And of course the Magical Good News of Magicalness is going to cure Jon of being an ass and let him make FWENDS. Because we couldn't have him actually working through his issues the slow way, now could we?
Sep 26, 2011 08:30PM
A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)

5 likes · like flag

Anila’s Previous Updates

Anila
Anila is on page 783 of 835
Even Jon, author's darling extraordinaire, has zero agency. He's just pushed around by secondary (two-dimensional) characters for plot purposes.
Nov 10, 2011 06:44PM
A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)


Anila
Anila is on page 763 of 835
finishing this POS this weekend. Writing up all my quote-rants will take a while after that, and the actual review will come after all those... it's going to be a while. but at least I'll be done soon.
Nov 10, 2011 06:09PM
A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)


Anila
Anila is on page 702 of 835
BTW, the most common cause for dwarfism is a dominant allele. Sooooo in all likelihood, Tyrion is not his father's son.
Nov 10, 2011 11:58AM
A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)


Anila
Anila is on page 667 of 835
It's like an accident on the highway - I don't want to slow down and stare, but I do. How does this book stay so consistently terrible?
Nov 09, 2011 04:20PM
A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)


Anila
Anila is on page 618 of 835
Just realized that reading praise for this book makes me actively angry. Dayum. This review is going to be a doozy. I almost want to finish the book sooner so I can vent my rage.
Nov 08, 2011 05:29PM
A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)


Anila
Anila is on page 618 of 835
Well, the good news is that this book got me through my homework for Monday pretty well. I'm going to reward myself by reading something good during the week. Something like, oh, Red Glove.
Nov 06, 2011 09:52PM
A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)


Anila
Anila is on page 594 of 835
Dear Mr. Martin: we get it. Men have penises. Now, would you please stop talking about 'manhoods'? First of all, it's a stupid euphemism; second, it has no place in the context of your story whatsoever.
Nov 06, 2011 07:25PM
A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)


Anila
Anila is on page 517 of 835
We get it, seriously: the blood of the First Men flows in the veins of the Starks. WE GOT IT THE FIRST SIX TIMES YOU SAID IT. WITH THAT EXACT PHRASING.
Nov 06, 2011 12:51PM
A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)


Anila
Anila is on page 514 of 835
Call 911; George R. R. Martin is axe-murdering the fantasy genre!
Nov 05, 2011 08:25PM
A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)


Anila
Anila is on page 501 of 835
GOD FUCKING DAMMIT. Mr. Martin, when I have HATED a character as much as I hated Viserys, I should enjoy his death. Instead, it makes me distinctly uncomfortable - not because you did something good, in making him three-dimensional and thus someone whose death I would regret, but because you wrote it so FUCKING BADLY. ALSO CAN WE TALK ABOUT HOW SICK THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DANY AND DROGO IS? I LOATHE THIS BOOK.
Nov 05, 2011 07:37PM
A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)


Comments (showing 1-50 of 55) (55 new)


message 1: by Cory (new) - added it

Cory Well duh. Stu's don't actually die and they don't actually suffer. Does he have a magical sword? Please tell me he doesn't have a magical sword.


Anila No... well, not yet. I wouldn't put it past him to aquire one. He's got the albino direwolf and some mad sword skillz, though, so just as bad.


message 3: by Cory (new) - added it

Cory I just looked. Yeah, he gets one. The bastard sword (no way). A special two hand sword for the very special darling.


message 4: by Kat Kennedy (new) - added it

Kat Kennedy I'm loving your updates for these.


Anila Cory: All I can say is... *eyeroll*

Kat: Thanks, I suppose? They're the only thing making the reading experience bearable.


message 6: by Cory (new) - added it

Cory I did warn you. I know I'm very, very picky with books, but I gave ample warnings.


Anila You did. But I'd already spent money on it.

Thank goodness I'm reading this now instead of a couple of years ago when I bought it - I'm getting a lot more out of it reading critically.


message 8: by Cory (last edited Sep 26, 2011 09:04PM) (new) - added it

Cory Knowing me, I probably would've bought it a few years ago too. At least Eragon has a plot and a goal. Even if Eragon is an annoying twit. It's sad that I haven't been able to get one straight answer about overall character motivation. Ah, and guess what? Dany's parts, which were compiled into a novella, actually won the Hugo. Are hers any good? I didn't care enough to read them.


Anila Well, she's only had two chapters so far, so I can't really pass judgement. The eventual Big Event involving her is paaaaainfully obvious, though. (Gee, give the girl from the house known as the Blood of the Dragon some dragon eggs for her wedding - I WONDER IF THEY WILL HATCH, HUH?)


message 10: by Cory (new) - added it

Cory *sigh*

(view spoiler)


message 11: by Anila (new) - rated it 1 star

Anila I know. I looked it up earlier today because I was worried it wouldn't happen in this book and then I'd never know. Unnecessary worry, as it turns out.


Kelly (view spoiler)


message 13: by Kaia (new) - rated it 2 stars

Kaia Yeah, I'm with Kelly. (view spoiler)

It doesn't really bother me that she can do that--one special ability does not a Mary Sue make. It's really the white hair and purple eyes that give her away more than anything else.


message 14: by Anila (new) - rated it 1 star

Anila Eyes more than hair I would argue, given that it's possible for someone to be white-blond. Purple eyes, well... not so much.


message 15: by Kaia (new) - rated it 2 stars

Kaia Purple eyes aren't impossible either, just extremely, extremely unlikely. True platinum blondes don't happen a lot either. So the combination is way too much.


Kelly Mostly I think it's indicative of too much inbreeding! Those would be recessive traits, I think...but if your family tree doesn't branch...


message 17: by Lucy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Lucy Btw, crows and ravens can be taught to imitate human speech. I don't know what the comprehension levels are or vocabulary ranges, but they can learn through repetition.


message 18: by Anila (new) - rated it 1 star

Anila Lucy: Huh, I didn't know that.

Buuut these are wild birdies, so even if they could be taught, these wouldn't have.

Kelly: There's definitely enough inbreeding in that family for it to be a possibiliity.


Kelly I want to say there turned out to be magic involving the ravens, or at least it's implied. IIRC, it goes back to when the maesters at the Citadel were a bit more competent.


message 20: by Anila (new) - rated it 1 star

Anila Hmmmmm....
I dislike this 'implied magic' nonsense.
But I will accept that explanation for the time being, sort of.


message 21: by Lina (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lina Beth wrote: "Yeah, I'm with Kelly. [spoilers removed]

It doesn't really bother me that she can do that--one special ability does not a Mary Sue make. It's really the white hair and purple eyes that give her a..."


Yes, but isn't that also a family trait? So it's not even her being the only special one, it's the entire family.

Also, the (view spoiler)


Kelly Yeah, and I think the whole purpose of the inbreeding was to preserve the dragon abilities, though that kind of got lost when there weren't any dragons anymore but they kept inbreeding anyway.


message 23: by Lina (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lina Kelly wrote: "Yeah, and I think the whole purpose of the inbreeding was to preserve the dragon abilities, though that kind of got lost when there weren't any dragons anymore but they kept inbreeding anyway."

That's pretty much how I saw it in the text, almost like the dragon abilities are a recessive trait and some get it and some don't (view spoiler)


Kelly Oh, and there's another thing going on with the ravens, too--it comes up in ADWD.

I agree, Princess 'Lina. The madness and the dragon abilities are both passed along by the inbreeding.


message 25: by Anila (new) - rated it 1 star

Anila Hmm. Well, that makes more sense.

About the ravens... nice to know there's something going on, but I don't think I'll make it to ADWD.


message 26: by Lina (last edited Sep 27, 2011 09:22AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lina Anila wrote: "Hmm. Well, that makes more sense.

About the ravens... nice to know there's something going on, but I don't think I'll make it to ADWD."


It's alright, Anila, I mean I enjoy the books a lot [I'm one book away from ADWD] but storylines are dragged out (especially due to the pov way it's written] and a lot of people aren't fond of that. [You don't even find out about who tried to kill Brian until book 3]

I only commented because I just wanted to "clarify" in a sense how I saw Dany's story being told :D.


Kelly I really like them too, but I totally get why others don't, and even I get horribly frustrated by the wait between books and the slow pace sometimes.


message 28: by Lina (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lina Kelly wrote: "I really like them too, but I totally get why others don't, and even I get horribly frustrated by the wait between books and the slow pace sometimes."

Right and it took me a while to really get the fact that there isn't really a right/wrong; good/bad group of people. I mean there are characters I like and dislike, but there is no character I would describe as purely good or purely bad [except Joff >.<].


message 29: by Kaia (new) - rated it 2 stars

Kaia Why does there need to be something with the ravens, though? Corvids are such smart birds. Tell me it's not magic.


message 30: by Lina (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lina Beth wrote: "Why does there need to be something with the ravens, though? Corvids are such smart birds. Tell me it's not magic."

Well I'm not up to that part yet, but I suppose it's just to develop the more fantasy elements of the book. Other than a few aspects the magic is not very in your face so the ravens is just a small way of making it more fantasy less historical-esq fiction.


Synesthesia (SPIDERS!) I love corvids. I really wish I had a pet one.

Maybe 2 or three of them.


message 32: by Lucy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Lucy I'm at the start of A Dance With Dragons and thus far I was under the impression that the birds didn't learn to speak through magical means, although since they're used to send messages and seem to understand where far flung places are from simple commands I'm guessing that probably has to be some magic involved?

The speaking though is not magic. Semi-traumatic childhood memory of one going after my hair barret and screaming "shiny" at me.


message 33: by Kaia (new) - rated it 2 stars

Kaia Birds understanding far flung places without magic isn't really outrageous, especially dealing in corvids. I mean, some of them use tools to hunt prey. And many birds migrate. I don't think magic is necessary to train a raven--just someone who knows how to make use of its smarts.


message 34: by Lina (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lina BTW@ Anila
Question, why does the implied magic aspect in bother you?


Kelly Lucy,

I think I remember reading somewhere that magic was used both to train them to fly between castles and to speak--that back in the way old days, they all recited the message instead of carrying a written message. I don't remember whether that was an interview or what. It's also possible that it was fan speculation and I'm all confused and need more coffee, but I think I remember getting that as Word of Martin at some point via westeros.org.

But we also find out in ADWD that some of the ones at Castle Black (view spoiler)


Kelly OK, here: http://awoiaf.westeros.org/index.php/...

I think I was right that more of the ravens used to speak, but I may have been wrong about why There may have just been more greenseers back then. Bleh, drat my swiss cheese memory today. I feel like I forgot my brain at home.


message 37: by Anila (new) - rated it 1 star

Anila Princess 'Lina wrote: "BTW@ Anila
Question, why does the implied magic aspect in bother you?"


Mostly because I'm very much a 'magical or not, PICK A DAMN SIDE' person when it comes to fiction. If there is magic, I want scads of it. If there is not magic, there needs to be none, zero, zilch. I like absolutes far more than I should.
Also, I've heard this series praised as 'high fantasy' and for it to be high fantasy, there needs to be more magic - magic being the defining trait of the subgenre, after all.
And 'implied magic' seems wishy-washy to me.

Mostly I don't like how the crows/ravens are showing up in general. I'm a chapter or so further along and it's clear they're normal, but how hard would it have been for Martin to slip in a phrase indicating that earlier? They still rub me the wrong way.


Kelly Ah, OK. Yeah, this series is sort of "low magic" at the beginning and then the magic becomes more prevalent throughout; it's one of the major themes actually: that magic has been largely absent from the world but is returning. So if that is a trope you don't like, then this series will give you fits. ;)


message 39: by Kaia (new) - rated it 2 stars

Kaia (view spoiler)


Kelly LOL! (view spoiler)


message 41: by Anila (new) - rated it 1 star

Anila Kelly: Hrm. It's an interesting concept, to be sure. Actually, most of the basic concepts of this book are interesting. I just don't think Martin is the best one to be handling them.
(Also, I've been turning the seasons thing over in my head for a few hours - how would that work? Lengthy elliptical orbit? But then to vary the length of seasons from year to year it would have to be erratic as well... is that feasible?)

As far as speed, both of story and of writing thereof... yeah. Even if the rest of the book gets good, that may lose me.


message 42: by Rachel (last edited Sep 27, 2011 11:50AM) (new)

Rachel Hartman Ravens can be taught to speak, not unlike parrots. (OMG, the sheer quantity of useless information in my head!!)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZyBNW...

(It's long, and the music is kind of irritating, sorry.)

(Also, missed Lucy saying the same thing earlier. Sorry. That's two sorries in one post! I'm in fine Canadian form this morning!)


message 43: by Anila (new) - rated it 1 star

Anila That's a really cool video, Rachel; thanks for sharing!

I definitely did not know that ravens could learn to speak. Very interesting...


message 44: by Lina (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lina Well, actually I think that this book is more of a political-ish drama/character driven story than magical. It is high-fantasy but it's not overblown, which I find interesting simply because I feel it makes everything a little bit more tangible. If you like it to either be "magic or not" this isn't the series for you because it doesn't really go to that point.


message 45: by Cory (new) - added it

Cory Rachel wrote: "Ravens can be taught to speak, not unlike parrots. (OMG, the sheer quantity of useless information in my head!!)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZyBNW...

(It's long, and the music is kind of ir..."


Thanks Rachel. I just spent 30min looking at vids of talking animals. The cuteness is dangerous.


message 46: by Anila (new) - rated it 1 star

Anila I think you and I have different definitions of high fantasy, Princess 'Lina. Mine - and I know this is not the standardized one - requires copious amounts of magic. To me, that's a lot of what characterizes fantasy as a genre: its use of magic. How much the magic is involved then determines where it sits on the high-to-low scale for me. (Except for urban fantasy, which is just kind of crouched on the edge trying to figure out whether or not it gets to be scaled at all.)
High fantasy also invokes a lot of Tolkeinesque tropes - elves, wizards, kings, Dark Lords, dwarves, etc. Not that all or any of those elements have to be present, and in the best they're not because only poor fantasists cling so tightly to Tolkein's model, but the mood of LOTR is definitely something that I associate with the definition of 'high fantasy'. Game of Thrones doesn't have that.
I definitely agree that it's a political drama (though I'm not sure about character-driven; seems to me it would need to have rather more character development to fit that label) but it's not really played straight as such.

I apologize in advance for my review because I know you really enjoyed the book and I loved your video on it. This will probably be the only one I read, so please don't de-friend me over it!


message 47: by Lina (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lina Psh, I'm not going to defriend you for having a different taste in books than me. We all have different tastes and you have every right to not enjoy a book. I will say that even if you didn't enjoy the book, you might enjoy the television show more. It moves a lot quicker

Well, the character development does happen--it just doesn't happen in this book for the most part until the end (with the exception of Dany). I mean there are characters I loved/hated in this book and now four books later I see them all in different lights. I think that due to the nature of the writing style of the stories it slows down the character's development because there is so much happening, but it does happen over the course of the books. However, if your like fuck that, I'd recommend the show, it's short and it moves a lot faster.

For me high fantasy can have varying ranges of magic, but I understand what you mean. Fantasy leads you to have certain expectations, especially high fantasy which does have more "wizards, elves, etc" not people arguing about who gets to be king.

I look forward to your review, I love seeing what the other side thinks!!




message 48: by Anila (new) - rated it 1 star

Anila Phew. *wipes sweat from forehead* Good to be sure, though.
I may actually watch the show, after hearing so much good about it. There are definitely things Martin does that don't work for me in print but would on a screen.

As far as character development - yeah, an 800 page book that only develops one character kind of goes against my central philosophy of series. Oh well. Damage done, money spent, it ain't the end of the world.

Not, of course, that people arguing about who gets to be king can't be high fantasy, as long as the right amount of magic is involved.


I'm already planning some of the things I want to include in this review. Mwahahaha... hopefully it will be sufficiently humorous.

(How do you find so many great gifs? Yours are consistently among the best I've seen - what's the secret?)


Kelly As for arguing about who gets to be king, I still think a large part of why I got so hooked on these books was that I'd just read The Sunne in Splendour, which is all about who gets to be king and has no magic at all! ;) Anyway, that book made the Wars of the Roses make sense to me, and GRRM uses a lot of parallels, so one of the fun things about reading GRRM's books for me was trying to catch all the Wars of the Roses parallels, with or without magic.


message 50: by Anila (new) - rated it 1 star

Anila Ah, that would be part of it. Some books are more fun if you're familliar with the historical events they're based on. (Some, like the Honor Harrington series, make you want to bash your head against a wall the more parallels you can spot, but so it goes.)

I don't know that much about the War of the Roses, but is it safe to say that Lannisters = Lancasters and Starks = Yorks?


« previous 1
back to top

all of Anila’s status updates
everyone’s updates from this book