Inna Shpitzberg’s Reviews > Poststructuralism: A Very Short Introduction > Status Update

Inna Shpitzberg
Inna Shpitzberg is on page 39 of 128
Clearly, there is considerable overlap between what Barthes calls ‘myth’ and what Althusser means by ‘ideology’. Which term should we adopt?
Sep 02, 2012 01:09AM
Poststructuralism: A Very Short Introduction

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Inna Shpitzberg
Inna Shpitzberg is on page 107 of 128
What poststructuralism offers is, in the end, an opportunity and a cause for reflection. It proposes a lexicon and a syntax, which is to say a vocabulary and an indication of the ways words legitimately relate to each other. But the language poststructuralism puts forward—on the basis, of course, in the first instance, of a study of language itself—is more useful in prompting the uncertainty of questions than in deli
Sep 02, 2012 05:29AM
Poststructuralism: A Very Short Introduction


Inna Shpitzberg
Inna Shpitzberg is on page 98 of 128
Powerless though we might seem to ourselves to be, everyone is located, Lyotard points out, in circuits of communication; we all occupy ‘nodal points’ to which messages are transmitted, and from which we re-transmit them. Interference with the message, however slight, changes the content, or the place of the addressee, and has the capacity to alter in the process the power relations it was designed to reaffirm.
Sep 02, 2012 05:13AM
Poststructuralism: A Very Short Introduction


Inna Shpitzberg
Inna Shpitzberg is on page 95 of 128
The experience of reading Žižek can be breathless, exhilarating, and infuriating by turns. He writes with apparently equal relish—and equal wit—on Hegel and popular cinema, Lacan and Jewish jokes. The first impression may be anarchic, and this is part of the pleasure, but the argument is often more rigorous than it seems.
Sep 02, 2012 05:05AM
Poststructuralism: A Very Short Introduction


Inna Shpitzberg
Inna Shpitzberg is on page 93 of 128
Slavoj Žižek has adapted Lacan's account to produce a more directly political analysis of the relation between human beings and society.
Sep 02, 2012 04:56AM
Poststructuralism: A Very Short Introduction


Inna Shpitzberg
Inna Shpitzberg is on page 93 of 128
Mercifully, desire does not always require so much of us as it does of Antigone. Freud attributed the existence of civilization to the process of sublimation, which transformed raw sexual drives into socially approved activities: artistic creation, for example.
Sep 02, 2012 04:53AM
Poststructuralism: A Very Short Introduction


Inna Shpitzberg
Inna Shpitzberg is on page 92 of 128
Lacan's heroine had already been invested with mythic status in French culture. Jean Anouilh's influential Antigone, first performed in occupied Paris in 1944, was widely understood at the time as a debate about the merits of resistance—and Resistance. Lacan unfolded his less ambivalent, but equally complex, reading of the Sophoclean original 15 years later.
Sep 02, 2012 04:51AM
Poststructuralism: A Very Short Introduction


Inna Shpitzberg
Inna Shpitzberg is on page 92 of 128
Lacan stresses the contradictory character of the compulsions that motivate us. Love of the lost object and the death drive are inextricably entwined with one another in desire. Antigone never gives up on hers. And although Lacan is often accused of misogyny, his heroic example is a woman.
Sep 02, 2012 04:51AM
Poststructuralism: A Very Short Introduction


Inna Shpitzberg
Inna Shpitzberg is on page 91 of 128
According to Lacan, the primordial object is always lost to the subject. The first object of the libido in Freud, as everyone knows, is the mother. For Lacan, however, the Mother (capital M) is not a person, but a structural position. In Lacan's account, this maternal love-object is lost in the real, from which the world of signifiers tends to sever us, but which, at the same time, we continue to inhabit, as contradi
Sep 02, 2012 04:48AM
Poststructuralism: A Very Short Introduction


Inna Shpitzberg
Inna Shpitzberg is on page 91 of 128
In Lacan's view, since neurosis stems from repression, and neurosis is destructive, it follows that we should never give up on our desire. This proposition, it turns out, is neither as simple nor as hedonistic as it sounds. It certainly does not legitimate helping yourself to whatever you (think you) want, because desire is always unconscious, and the object of our conscious wishes is only a standin for something unr
Sep 02, 2012 04:47AM
Poststructuralism: A Very Short Introduction


Inna Shpitzberg
Inna Shpitzberg is on page 90 of 128
Much of Derrida's later work has been concerned with ethics, the problem of right action in a world without foundational truths to constitute a ground for choice.
Sep 02, 2012 04:40AM
Poststructuralism: A Very Short Introduction


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