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A History of Capitalism According to the Jubilee Line by John O'Farrell
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The Crow Road by Iain Banks
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Nationalism, Colonialism, and Literature by Terry Eagleton
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Aran rated a book 4 of 5 stars
Austerity Britain by David Kynaston
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On reflection, a 600-page social history of postwar Britain may have been an odd choice of recreational reading during the final weeks of my Master's dissertation. On the other hand, it is a very good 600-page social history of postwar Britain.
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Olalla by Robert Louis Stevenson
Olalla
by Robert Louis Stevenson
read in July, 2015
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The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil by Stephen    Collins
The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil
by Stephen Collins (Goodreads Author)
read in June, 2015
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Critical Practice by Catherine Belsey
Critical Practice
by Catherine Belsey
read in June, 2015
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Stellar wee book. Lucid and troubling.
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The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil by Stephen    Collins
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Twentieth-Century Irish Literature by Aaron Kelly
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More of Aran's books…
K.J. Parker
“The easiest way to do anything is properly.”
K.J. Parker

China Miéville
“When people dis fantasy—mainstream readers and SF readers alike—they are almost always talking about one sub-genre of fantastic literature. They are talking about Tolkien, and Tolkien's innumerable heirs. Call it 'epic', or 'high', or 'genre' fantasy, this is what fantasy has come to mean. Which is misleading as well as unfortunate.

Tolkien is the wen on the arse of fantasy literature. His oeuvre is massive and contagious—you can't ignore it, so don't even try. The best you can do is consciously try to lance the boil. And there's a lot to dislike—his cod-Wagnerian pomposity, his boys-own-adventure glorying in war, his small-minded and reactionary love for hierarchical status-quos, his belief in absolute morality that blurs moral and political complexity. Tolkien's clichés—elves 'n' dwarfs 'n' magic rings—have spread like viruses. He wrote that the function of fantasy was 'consolation', thereby making it an article of policy that a fantasy writer should mollycoddle the reader.

That is a revolting idea, and one, thankfully, that plenty of fantasists have ignored. From the Surrealists through the pulps—via Mervyn Peake and Mikhael Bulgakov and Stefan Grabiński and Bruno Schulz and Michael Moorcock and M. John Harrison and I could go on—the best writers have used the fantastic aesthetic precisely to challenge, to alienate, to subvert and undermine expectations.

Of course I'm not saying that any fan of Tolkien is no friend of mine—that would cut my social circle considerably. Nor would I claim that it's impossible to write a good fantasy book with elves and dwarfs in it—Michael Swanwick's superb Iron Dragon's Daughter gives the lie to that. But given that the pleasure of fantasy is supposed to be in its limitless creativity, why not try to come up with some different themes, as well as unconventional monsters? Why not use fantasy to challenge social and aesthetic lies?

Thankfully, the alternative tradition of fantasy has never died. And it's getting stronger. Chris Wooding, Michael Swanwick, Mary Gentle, Paul di Filippo, Jeff VanderMeer, and many others, are all producing works based on fantasy's radicalism. Where traditional fantasy has been rural and bucolic, this is often urban, and frequently brutal. Characters are more than cardboard cutouts, and they're not defined by race or sex. Things are gritty and tricky, just as in real life. This is fantasy not as comfort-food, but as challenge.

The critic Gabe Chouinard has said that we're entering a new period, a renaissance in the creative radicalism of fantasy that hasn't been seen since the New Wave of the sixties and seventies, and in echo of which he has christened the Next Wave. I don't know if he's right, but I'm excited. This is a radical literature. It's the literature we most deserve.”
China Miéville

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