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A Short History o...
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Richard Griffith is now a fan of Bill Bryson
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Martin Chuzzlewit by Charles Dickens Vote on this list »
Richard Griffith is currently reading
A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson
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In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
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Richard Griffith and 8 other people liked Bernard Cornwell's blog post: THE HISTORICAL FICTIONIST
"The Historical Fictionist is a new web-based fanzine for people who like historical novels.  I was honoured to be interviewed for the debut edition. It’s a free magazine and if you would like to subscribe to get it delivered to your inbox every qu..." Read more of this blog post »
Richard Griffith wants to read
The Inextinguishable Symphony by Martin Goldsmith
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Alex's Wake by Martin Goldsmith
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Richard Griffith started reading
In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
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Midnight Rising by Tony Horwitz
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Richard Griffith started reading
Midnight Rising by Tony Horwitz
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More of Richard's books…
George Eliot
“One’s self-satisfaction is an untaxed kind of property which it is very unpleasant to find deprecated.”
George Eliot, Middlemarch
tags: pride

George Eliot
“For the egoism which enters into our theories does not affect their sincerity; rather, the more our egoism is satisfied, the more robust is our belief.”
George Eliot, Middlemarch

George Eliot
“But the effect of her being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.”
George Eliot, Middlemarch