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The Ridge
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by Michael Koryta (Goodreads Author)
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Bangkok 8
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Alif the Unseen
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by G. Willow Wilson (Goodreads Author)
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See all 7 books that Cameron is reading…

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Cameron is currently reading
The Ridge by Michael Koryta
The Ridge
by Michael Koryta (Goodreads Author)
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Bangkok 8 by John Burdett
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Firefight by Brandon Sanderson
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Alif the Unseen by G. Willow Wilson
Alif the Unseen
by G. Willow Wilson (Goodreads Author)
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Soul of the Fire by Eliot Pattison
Soul of the Fire (Inspector Shan, #8)
by Eliot Pattison (Goodreads Author)
read in December, 2014
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Soul of the Fire by Eliot Pattison
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The Slow Regard of Silent Things by Patrick Rothfuss
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Mandarin Gate by Eliot Pattison
Mandarin Gate (Inspector Shan, #7)
by Eliot Pattison (Goodreads Author)
read in November, 2014
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War God by Graham Hancock
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Maplecroft by Cherie Priest
Maplecroft (The Borden Dispatches #1)
by Cherie Priest (Goodreads Author)
read in September, 2014
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More of Cameron's books…
Brandon Sanderson
“Life before Death.
Strength before Weakness.
Journey before Destination.”
Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

Brandon Sanderson
“Expectations were like fine pottery. The harder you held them, the more likely they were to crack.”
Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

Patrick Rothfuss
“Perhaps the greatest faculty our minds possess is the ability to cope with pain. Classic thinking teaches us of the four doors of the mind, which everyone moves through according to their need.

First is the door of sleep. Sleep offers us a retreat from the world and all its pain. Sleep marks passing time, giving us distance from the things that have hurt us. When a person is wounded they will often fall unconscious. Similarly, someone who hears traumatic news will often swoon or faint. This is the mind's way of protecting itself from pain by stepping through the first door.

Second is the door of forgetting. Some wounds are too deep to heal, or too deep to heal quickly. In addition, many memories are simply painful, and there is no healing to be done. The saying 'time heals all wounds' is false. Time heals most wounds. The rest are hidden behind this door.

Third is the door of madness. There are times when the mind is dealt such a blow it hides itself in insanity. While this may not seem beneficial, it is. There are times when reality is nothing but pain, and to escape that pain the mind must leave reality behind.

Last is the door of death. The final resort. Nothing can hurt us after we are dead, or so we have been told.”
Patrick Rothfuss, The Name of the Wind

Hayao Miyazaki
“Modern life is so thin and shallow and fake. I look forward to when developers go bankrupt, Japan gets poorer and wild grasses take over.”
Hayao Miyazaki

Mark Z. Danielewski
“Who has never killed an hour? Not casually or without thought, but carefully: a premeditated murder of minutes. The violence comes from a combination of giving up, not caring, and a resignation that getting past it is all you can hope to accomplish. So you kill the hour. You do not work, you do not read, you do not daydream. If you sleep it is not because you need to sleep. And when at last it is over, there is no evidence: no weapon, no blood, and no body. The only clue might be the shadows beneath your eyes or a terribly thin line near the corner of your mouth indicating something has been suffered, that in the privacy of your life you have lost something and the loss is too empty to share.”
Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

Patrick
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