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The Idiot
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"I keep on looking at Prince Myshkin and going 'That's me'. It's rather depressing in it's own way." Jun 15, 2013 06:11PM

 
The Empty Space: ...
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Max Williams is now friends with Johanna Stalker
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Max Williams is on page 102 of 667 of The Idiot: I keep on looking at Prince Myshkin and going 'That's me'. It's rather depressing in it's own way.
The Idiot
The Idiot
by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
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Max Williams is currently reading
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
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Max Williams is currently reading
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
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King Henry IV, Part 1 by William Shakespeare
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Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by Frederick Douglass
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The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
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Richard III by William Shakespeare
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King Henry VI, Part 3 by William Shakespeare
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More of Max's books…
Percy Bysshe Shelley
Ozymandias

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown
And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.
And on the pedestal these words appear:
'My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings:
Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!'
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare,
The lone and level sands stretch far away.”
Percy Bysshe Shelley, Ozymandias

Vladimir Nabokov
“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta. She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock. She was Lola in slacks. She was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always Lolita. Did she have a precursor? She did, indeed she did. In point of fact, there might have been no Lolita at all had I not loved, one summer, an initial girl-child. In a princedom by the sea. Oh when? About as many years before Lolita was born as my age was that summer. You can always count on a murderer for a fancy prose style. Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, exhibit number one is what the seraphs, the misinformed, simple, noble-winged seraphs, envied. Look at this tangle of thorns.”
Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

Jonathan Swift
“I cannot but conclude that the Bulk of your Natives, to be the most pernicious Race of little odious Vermin that Nature ever suffered to crawl upon the Surface of the Earth.”
Jonathan Swift, Gulliver's Travels

David Foster Wallace
“And make no mistake: irony tyrannizes us. The reason why our pervasive cultural irony is at once so powerful and so unsatisfying is that an ironist is impossible to pin down. All U.S. irony is based on an implicit "I don’t really mean what I’m saying." So what does irony as a cultural norm mean to say? That it’s impossible to mean what you say? That maybe it’s too bad it’s impossible, but wake up and smell the coffee already? Most likely, I think, today’s irony ends up saying: "How totally banal of you to ask what I really mean.”
David Foster Wallace

John Fowles
“It is only when our characters and events begin to disobey us that they begin to live.”
John Fowles, The French Lieutenant's Woman

25x33 The Pumpernickel Athenaeum — 5 members — last activity Feb 07, 2012 10:26AM
Fans of the F@nb0y$ webcomic for the advocacy of literacy and book discussion.
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