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Career Solutions ...
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  (page 143 of 320)
Aug 31, 2014 08:29PM

 
Mel Bay presents ...
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Mandolin for Dummies
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  (page 70 of 396)
Dec 29, 2013 12:34PM

 

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Jo rated a book 3 of 5 stars
Writing on the Wall by Tom Standage
Writing on the Wall: Social Media - The First 2,000 Years
by Tom Standage (Goodreads Author)
read in November, 2014
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An overview of media (social and otherwise) from Classic times to present. Basically putting social media into an historic frame and showing its similarity to the way media functioned before mainstream media arouse in the 1800s.
Jo is on page 184 of 288 of Writing on the Wall: "in 1881 a New York doctor, George Beard, published a book called American Nervousness, which blamed the telegraph and the press for contributing to an epidemic of "nervousness" caused by the increased pace of business and social life." Ha! I wonder what he would've thought of the internet.
Writing on the Wall by Tom Standage
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The Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan
The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals
by Michael Pollan (Goodreads Author)
read in November, 2014
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Race by Denise Eileen McCoskey
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An interesting attempt to examine race, ethnicity and culture from an alternative perspective than our modern one.
Jo rated a book 3 of 5 stars
Free & Public by John Fleischman
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Race by Denise Eileen McCoskey
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Writing on the Wall by Tom Standage
" Oops 1100s (12th century) "
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Writing on the Wall by Tom Standage
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Yoga Anatomy by Leslie Kaminoff
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Career Solutions for Creative People by Ronda Ormont
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More of Jo's books…
Jane Yolen
“Literature is a textually transmitted disease, normally contracted in childhood.”
Jane Yolen, Touch Magic: Fantasy, Faerie & Folklore in the Literature of Childhood

Rosemarie Urquico
“You should date a girl who reads.
Date a girl who reads. Date a girl who spends her money on books instead of clothes, who has problems with closet space because she has too many books. Date a girl who has a list of books she wants to read, who has had a library card since she was twelve.

Find a girl who reads. You’ll know that she does because she will always have an unread book in her bag. She’s the one lovingly looking over the shelves in the bookstore, the one who quietly cries out when she has found the book she wants. You see that weird chick sniffing the pages of an old book in a secondhand book shop? That’s the reader. They can never resist smelling the pages, especially when they are yellow and worn.

She’s the girl reading while waiting in that coffee shop down the street. If you take a peek at her mug, the non-dairy creamer is floating on top because she’s kind of engrossed already. Lost in a world of the author’s making. Sit down. She might give you a glare, as most girls who read do not like to be interrupted. Ask her if she likes the book.

Buy her another cup of coffee.

Let her know what you really think of Murakami. See if she got through the first chapter of Fellowship. Understand that if she says she understood James Joyce’s Ulysses she’s just saying that to sound intelligent. Ask her if she loves Alice or she would like to be Alice.

It’s easy to date a girl who reads. Give her books for her birthday, for Christmas, for anniversaries. Give her the gift of words, in poetry and in song. Give her Neruda, Pound, Sexton, Cummings. Let her know that you understand that words are love. Understand that she knows the difference between books and reality but by god, she’s going to try to make her life a little like her favorite book. It will never be your fault if she does.

She has to give it a shot somehow.

Lie to her. If she understands syntax, she will understand your need to lie. Behind words are other things: motivation, value, nuance, dialogue. It will not be the end of the world.

Fail her. Because a girl who reads knows that failure always leads up to the climax. Because girls who read understand that all things must come to end, but that you can always write a sequel. That you can begin again and again and still be the hero. That life is meant to have a villain or two.

Why be frightened of everything that you are not? Girls who read understand that people, like characters, develop. Except in the Twilight series.

If you find a girl who reads, keep her close. When you find her up at 2 AM clutching a book to her chest and weeping, make her a cup of tea and hold her. You may lose her for a couple of hours but she will always come back to you. She’ll talk as if the characters in the book are real, because for a while, they always are.

You will propose on a hot air balloon. Or during a rock concert. Or very casually next time she’s sick. Over Skype.

You will smile so hard you will wonder why your heart hasn’t burst and bled out all over your chest yet. You will write the story of your lives, have kids with strange names and even stranger tastes. She will introduce your children to the Cat in the Hat and Aslan, maybe in the same day. You will walk the winters of your old age together and she will recite Keats under her breath while you shake the snow off your boots.

Date a girl who reads because you deserve it. You deserve a girl who can give you the most colorful life imaginable. If you can only give her monotony, and stale hours and half-baked proposals, then you’re better off alone. If you want the world and the worlds beyond it, date a girl who reads.

Or better yet, date a girl who writes.”
Rosemarie Urquico

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
“All grown-ups were once children... but only few of them remember it.”
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince

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